2019 Alamance County Program Impact Report

Approved: January 14, 2020

I. Executive Summary

Alamance County is a diverse county due to the urban corridor that dissects the middle of the county. This urban corridor follows the interstates of I 40/85. North and south of the urban corridor you will find a great deal of agricultural activity. County elected officials and the general public agree that agriculture is very important to the county. Preserving Agriculture is one of the five Action Pillars of the new Alamance County Strategic Plan adopted by the Board of County Commissioners in 2018. They value the open land and green space it provides. More small farms are starting to produce and sell food and other products locally. People are more aware of where their food comes from and prefer that they can actually go see the people that produce the food they eat. Other issues the county faces are similar to other areas of the state. Preserving farmland, having safe and nutritious food, food preservation, youth development, economic development and volunteerism are issues that are faced by many counties.
In 2019, Cooperative Extension provided the citizens of Alamance County educational information on the objectives; Profitable and Sustainable Agricultural Systems; Healthy Eating, Physical Activity and Chronic Disease Risk Reduction, School to Career, Leadership Development, Local Food Systems, Urban and Consumer Agriculture.
The Profitable and Sustainable Animal Production Systems objective was addressed by providing educational workshops on topics like Pasture Management and a Horse Owner Workshop. Regional programs included the Regional Beef Conference, Central Piedmont Livestock Show and Sale and a Regional Sheep and Goat Conference. Over 200 participants attended eleven events conducted through the Alamance County Extension Livestock program.
A Corn Variety Trial and Field Day attended by forty five producers was one of the activities that helped address the Profitable and Sustainable Plant Production Systems objective. Regional programming included the Annual Tobacco Good Agricultural Practices and Production Meeting as well as a Regional Grain Production Meeting. Farm visits to address production issues, diagnose diseases problems helped local producers increase yields, and farm income. Local Food Systems were supported by farm visits to address production issues, a Farm to Table program for 4th graders and a Leadership Alamance Farm Tour for the local Chamber of Commerce.
The Healthy Eating, Physical Activity and Chronic Disease Risk Reduction objectives activities included the Color Me Healthy program at the Burlington Housing Authority, a Diabetes Prevention class, a 4-H Healthy Living Camp, Med Instead of Meds and a Safe Plates course. Over 150 people attended these events in 2019.
The 4-H Youth Development program addressed the School to Career and Leadership Development objectives through STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) education and 4-H club activities. The Embryology Program was implemented in 14 schools reaching over 1000 youth. Other 4-H activities included participating in 4-H Camp, Congress, a successful Summer Sizzle program and A Celebration Night to recognize 4-H members and volunteers.
The Urban and Consumer Agriculture objective reached over 200 citizens through the Think Green Thursdays gardening class series. Another 150 people received home visits to address tree or landscape problems that could not be solved with a phone call or email. Extension Master Gardener Volunteers are an essential part of the program helping to maintain the Arbor Gate Teaching garden and the Buster Sykes Demonstration Farm and Forest. They also volunteer on the telephone hotline, local wellness fairs and the annual Herb Festival. The Alamance Gardener e-newsletter provides gardening information to over 2,000 subscribers.
Almost 13,000 Alamance County residents received direct educational services from Alamance County Extension in the form of classes, demonstrations, field days and farm visits. Another 134,000 contacts were made through newsletters, phone calls and emails. Volunteers in all program areas donated over 3,800 hours of time valued at over $97,000. Agents acquired additional revenue from donations and user fees totaling over $22,000.

II. County Background

Alamance County is in the Piedmont Region of North Carolina. North Carolina is one of the fastest growing states in the United States and Alamance County is a rapidly growing area because of the low tax rates and easy access to Triad and Triangle cities. The population of 155,000 continues to grow. The citizens have recognized one major attraction to the county is the open space versus continued uncontrolled development that would make the county a less desirable place to live. Rural areas of the county continue to have active farming operations. The county still has the traditional farming enterprises but smaller farms are on the increase. Some of the farms are part-time ventures and some are lifestyle farms producing vegetables and meat. Some of these new small farmers have made a decision to change their lifestyle by moving to the farm and living on a few acres producing vegetables, flowers, eggs and meat.

The Cooperative Extension office started the environmental scanning by surveying the specialized committees that the agents had in place. This gave us a grassroots look at what the specialized groups were concerned with in the county. These groups included; youth, school groups, farmers, health educators, food industry personnel, horticultural groups and non-farm groups. This information was compiled and the County Advisory Leadership group looked at the issues and ranked them as they saw the importance to the county. After the Advisory Leadership members ranked the issues the Cooperative Extension staff reviewed their recommendations to see how they lined up with the state objectives.

The major county issues identified by the citizens of Alamance County to be addressed by the Extension staff in 2019 are:

Profitable and Sustainable Agricultural Systems

School to Career

Leadership Development

Local Food Systems

Urban and Consumer Agriculture

Healthy Eating, Physical Activity and Chronic Disease Risk Reduction


Extension will use research based information to address these issues identified by the citizens of the county. Extension will work with specialists at NC State and A&T State University to obtain research based information. We will partner with county citizens, county government, other state and county agencies to bring educational information to citizens of the county and state. Volunteers will also be an important group of people to help with these issues since they work with youth, serve on many committees, give many hours of volunteer work in the Master Gardener program, allow on-farm tests on their property just to name a few activities they help with. Extension will do educational programming to address these issues, help citizens identify plant and animal problems and offer solutions to these problems. Youth will be offered the opportunity to learn life skills through educational programs, camps and specialized learning opportunities. Healthy lifestyles, including proper diets, safe food production and preparation will be addressed.

We will use the following methods to disseminate information to citizens of North Carolina and Alamance County; newsletters, newspaper articles, local radio, Facebook, emails, telephone consultations, home and/or farm consultations, local and area meetings, demonstrations and on-farm tests. We will also work with other organizations to help improve the lives of our citizens.

III. Objectives to Address the Cooperative Extension Long Range Plan

Our plant production programs improve production, profitability, and sustainability of the agriculture sector.

Value* Outcome Description
8Number of producers who gain skills or knowledge to increase production for local markets.
5Number of producers who improve local food marketing skills or knowledge.
209Number of pesticide applicators receiving continuing education credits
22Number of pesticide credit hours provided
480Number of crop (all plant systems) producers increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, and/or skills as related to: 1. Best management production practices (cultural, nutrient, and genetics) 2. Pest/insect, disease, weed, wildlife management 3. Financial/Farm management tools and practices (business, marketing, government policy, human resources) 4. Alternative agriculture, bioenergy, and value-added enterprises
9Number of Extension initiated and controlled county demonstration test sites
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
3Number of producers who diversified their marketing strategies into local markets (direct, intermediated/food service, institutional).
6Number of producers (and other members of the local food supply chain) who have increased revenue
4Number of new farms (beginning farmers) selling into local markets for local consumption (in this reporting period)
30Number of farmers, employees or family members adopting regular use of appropriate PPE following AgriSafe or Certified Safe Farm participation
45Number of producers reporting reduction in fertilizer used per acre
10Number of crop (all plant systems) producers adopting best management practices, including those practices related to nutrient management, conservation, production, cultivars, pest management (weeds, diseases, insects), business management, and marketing
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Our animal production programs improve production, profitability, and sustainability of the agriculture sector.

Value* Outcome Description
62Number of producers who gain skills or knowledge to increase production for local markets.
62Number of animal producers who increased knowledge of farm business management, business planning, financial management, marketing, or estate planning.
197Number of animal producers who learned how to develop a management plan (i.e. grazing plan, feeding plan, drought plan, business plan, disaster plan, etc.)
302Number of producers who increased knowledge of pasture/forage management practices (field improvement, herbicide management, grazing season extension, weed control, forage quality, haylage production, nitrate testing, etc.)
351Number of producers who increased knowledge of nutrition, ration balancing, mineral supplements, breeding, and reproduction
71Number of producers who increased knowledge of the strategies to promote animal health and welfare and reduce the potential for infectious diseases through proper use of vaccines, biosecurity, detection and identification of common diseases, appropriate use of animal medications, and mitigation of antimicrobial resistance transmission
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
62Number of producers who diversified their marketing strategies into local markets (direct, intermediated/food service, institutional).
161Number of producers (and other members of the local food supply chain) who have increased revenue
62Number of producers adopting extension-recommended practices related to planning, marketing, and financial management
101Number of producers who adopted Extension-recommended best management practices and production changes related to quality assurance (vaccinations, castration, culling techniques, etc.)
351Number of producers who adopted Extension-recommended best management practices and production changes related to nutrition (mineral, feed rations)
108Number of producers who adopted Extension-recommended best management practices and production changes related to internal parasite management (fecals, deworming)
299Number of producers who adopted Extension-recommended best management practices related to pasture management
350Number of producers who adopted Extension-recommended best management practices and production changes related to nutrition, ration balancing, mineral supplement, breeding, and reproduction
71Number of producers using improved biosecurity practices
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Our 4-H youth development programs grow the skills young people need to succeed in life and career.

Value* Outcome Description
62Number of teachers trained in 4-H STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) curriculum
1222Number of youth (students) increasing knowledge in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math)
608Total number of female participants in STEM program
15Number of youth (students) participating in 4-H dropout prevention (student at-risk) programs
90Number of high school age youth (students) participating as members of 4-H clubs
1520Number of youth increasing knowledge of life skills
1237Number of children/youth who improved knowledge of local food and agricultural systems.
1520Number of youth increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
1237Number of youth demonstrating increased knowledge of natural resources and environmental issues
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
62Number of teachers using 4-H STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) curriculum in their classrooms
1220Number of youth (students) gaining career / employability skills
1220Number of youth (students) gaining entrepreneurship skills
1520Number of youth using effective life skills
1520Number of youth willing to participate in conservation actions
1220Number of youth increasing their physical activity
9Number of youth volunteers serving in new or expanded roles within Extension
17Number of youth volunteers serving in new or expanded roles beyond Extension, including community boards and task forces
17Number of youth assuming new/expanded leadership roles in the community
610Number of youth increasing their fruit and vegetable consumption
610Number of youth who grow food in school gardens.
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Our consumer horticulture programs teach families and communities about environmentally friendly methods for gardening and controlling pests.

Value* Outcome Description
160Number of individuals who gain knowledge or acquire skills related to vegetable/fruit gardening
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
34Number of individuals who grow food in community gardens.
18Number of individuals who begin home food production by starting a vegetable and/or fruit garden
150Number of participants who use extension-recommended best management practices in landscapes, turf, and gardens, including pest (insect, weed, disease, wildlife) and soil management
75Number of participants selecting appropriate landscape plants (adapted, drought tolerant, appropriate size, etc.)
55Number of participants growing food for home consumption
22Number of participants adopting composting
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Our food safety and nutrition programs create a safer and more sustainable food supply and improve the health and nutrition of individuals, families, and our communities.

Value* Outcome Description
156Number of participants who increase their knowledge of safe home food handling, preservation, or preparation practices
11Number of food handlers who increase their knowledge and skills in safe food handling practices
156Number of individuals who learn how to prepare local foods, including through use of home food preservation techniques.
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
69Number of adults increasing their fruit and vegetables consumption
118Number of participants increasing their physical activity
300Number of pounds of local food donated for consumption by vulnerable populations
42Number of participants who consume less sodium in their diet
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

IV. Number of Contacts Made by Extension

Type of ContactNumber
Face-to-face* 12,836
Non face-to-face** 134,187
Total by Extension staff in 2019 147,023
* Face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make directly with individuals through one-on-one visits, meetings, and other activities where staff members work directly with individuals.
** Non face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make indirectly with individuals by telephone, email, newsletters, news articles, radio, television, and other means.

V. Designated Grants Received by Extension

Type of GrantAmount
Contracts/Grants $0.00
Gifts/Donations $13,340.00
In-Kind Grants/Donations $1,400.00
United Way/Foundations $0.00
User Fees $8,145.00
Total $22,885.00

VI. Volunteer Involvement in Extension Programs

Number of Volunteers* Number of Volunteer Hours Known client contacts by volunteers Dollar Value at 25.43
4-H 57 191 396 $ 4,857.00
Advisory Leadership System 116 170 776 $ 4,323.00
Extension Master Gardener 477 3476 1383 $ 88,395.00
Other: Agriculture 3 5 49 $ 127.00
Other: Food & Nutrition 19 46 138 $ 1,170.00
Total: 672 3888 2742 $ 98,872.00
* The number of volunteers reflects the overall number of volunteers for multiple events.

VII. Membership of Advisory Leadership System

County Advisory Leadership System
Gerry Cohn
Dorothy Humble
Wayne Bunting
Jackie Cole
Dick Fisher
Dr. Ralph Houser
Carl Carroll
William Lock
Steve Love
Ruby Manning
Clay Smith
Angelo Enoch
Martha Jacoby
Brenda Morris
Pam King
Aeriel Miller
Marta McKensie


Field Crops Specialized Committee
Darrell Davis
Kyle Norris
Ricky Reid
Michael McPherson
Robert Stas
Buster Sykes Demonstration Farm specialized Committee
Rett Davis
Bill Locke
Jackie Cole
Dick Fisher
Lynn Moseley
Keith Brady
4-H Advisory Board
Jenny Faulkner
Terry Isley
Stephen Byrd
Anthony Baker
Keisha Butler
Kay Cole
Tonya Dobson
Nancy Gilliam
Pam King
J’taime Lyons
Carey Owen
Jessica Simmons
Toni Stephens
Pam Thompson
Michelle White


Voluntary Agricultural District
Charles Ansell
Roger Cobb
Greg Huffine
Bill Miller
Paul Walker
Charles Newlin
Steve Love

Livestock Specialized Committee
Allison Cooper
Dr. John Parks
John Crawford
Jana Murdock-Doherty
Kenny Owens
Steve McPherson
Tommy Dodson
Eddie Robertson
Gary Cox
Rachel George
Lauren Kahn

Consumer Horticulture Specialized Committee
Linda Humble
Dot Humble
Nan Schaller
Margaret Egede-Nissen
Miriam Jernigan
Linda Nunemaker
Ann Wooten
Liz Wells
Jennell Harris
Judy Driscoll
Susan Owen
Linda Douglas
Marti Lipsky
Beef Cattle Specialized Committee
Frank Bell
Kenny Owens
Sid Barker
Terry Ribelin
Don York
Rob Stas
David Deatherage

VIII. Staff Membership

Mark Danieley
Title: Interim County Extension Director & Extension Agent, Agriculture - Horticulture
Phone: (336) 570-6740
Email: mark_danieley@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: County Extension Director Horticulture Extension Agent

Jonas Asbill
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Poultry
Phone: (336) 318-6000
Email: jonas_asbill@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Serving the poultry industry across 20 counties in the North Central and Northeast districts

Dwayne Dabbs
Title: Extension Agent, Agriculture - Field Crops, Pesticide Coordinator
Phone: (336) 570-6740
Email: dcdabbs@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provide educational programs and answer questions pertaining to Field Crops in Alamance County, and provide Pesticide Applicators programs to earn re-certification credits.

Marti Day
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Dairy
Phone: (919) 542-8202
Email: marti_day@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Responsible for educational programs for dairy farmers, youth with an interest in dairy projects and the general public with an interest in dairy foods and the dairy industry.

Erin Eure
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Commercial Fruits and Vegetables
Phone: (252) 357-1400
Email: erin_eure@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provides educational opportunities and technical support to commercial fruit and vegetable growers, agents, and industry in northeastern NC.

Eleanor Frederick
Title: Extension Agent, Family and Consumer Sciences
Phone: (336) 570-6740
Email: eleanor_frederick@ncsu.edu

Marissa Herchler
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Animal Food Safety (FSMA Programs)
Phone: (919) 515-5396
Email: marissa_herchler@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Marissa is an Area Specialized Agent for animal food safety, with emphasis on the new Food Safety Modernization Act rules, as they apply to feed mills in North Carolina. Please contact Marissa with any FSMA related questions, or PCQI training inquiries.

Beverly Jenkins
Title: County Extension Administrative Assistant
Phone: (336) 570-6740
Email: beverly_jenkins@ncsu.edu

Stacey Jones
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Commercial Nursery and Greenhouse
Phone: (704) 920-3310
Email: stacey_jones@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: I work with commercial greenhouses and nurseries to help them with growing related issues. These issues range from pests (insect, disease, and weeds), substrates, nutrition, and other miscellaneous topics.

Taylor Jones
Title: Extension Agent, 4-H Youth Development
Phone: (336) 570-6740
Email: taylor_jones@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provide positive programs and educational opportunities to youth ages 5 through 18 in Alamance County.

Peggie Lewis Joyce
Title: Area 4-H Agent - Central Region
Phone: (336) 242-2080
Email: peggie_lewis@ncsu.edu

Lauren Langley
Title: Extension Agent, Agriculture - Livestock and Forages
Phone: (336) 570-6740
Email: lauren_langley@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Responsibilities include livestock, forages, and youth livestock.

Cynthia Pierce
Title: County Extension Support Specialist
Phone: (336) 570-6740
Email: cynthia_pierce@ncsu.edu

Ashley Robbins
Title: Area Specialized Agent - Dairy
Phone: (919) 542-8203
Email: ashley_robbins@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Marti Day and I are the Area Specialized Dairy Agents - the county-based arm of the Cooperative Extension Dairy Team. We are out here in the counties to help you set and reach your farm, family and business goals. We have collaborative expertise in the areas of Waste Management, Udder Health, Cow Comfort, Nutrition and Forage Management with specialties in (Ashley)Reproduction, Records Management, Animal Health and (Marti)Alternative Markets, Organic Dairy, Grazing Management, and On-farm Processing. We hope to provide comprehensive educational programs for our farmers, consumers and youth for every county across the state. We are here for you by phone, email or text and look forward to working with you!

Chip Simmons
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Food Safety
Phone: (919) 414-5632
Email: odsimmon@ncsu.edu

Christine Stecker
Title: Horticulture Technician
Phone: (336) 570-6740
Email: christine_stecker@ncsu.edu

Mitch Woodward
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Watersheds and Water Quality
Phone: (919) 414-3873
Email: mdwoodwa@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: NC Cooperative Extension's Goals include: - NC's natural resources and environmental quality will be protected, conserved and enhanced. - NC will have profitable, environmentally sustainable plant, animal and food systems. Protecting our environmental resources, particularly drinking water quality, is a top priority in NC. NC Cooperative Extension is a leader in teaching, researching, and accelerating the adoption of effective water quality protection practices.

IX. Contact Information

Alamance County Center
209-C N Graham-Hopedale Rd
Burlington, NC 27217

Phone: (336) 570-6740
Fax: (336) 570-6689
URL: http://alamance.ces.ncsu.edu