2017 Alamance County Program Impact Report

Approved: January 8, 2018

I. Executive Summary

Alamance County is a diverse county due to the urban corridor that dissects the middle of the county. This urban corridor follows the interstates of I 40/85. North and south of the urban corridor you will find a great deal of agricultural activity. Somehow it has evolved that the dairy industry in the county is south of the urban corridor and tobacco production is north of the urban corridor. County elected officials and the general public agree that agriculture is very important to the county. They value the open land and green space it provides. More small farms are starting to produce and sell food and other products locally. People are more aware of where their food comes from and prefer that they can actually go see the people that produce the food they eat. Spending their food money locally is more sustainable. Other issues the county faces are similar to other areas of the state. Preserving farmland, having safe and nutritious food, food preservation, youth development, economic development and volunteerism are issues that are faced by many counties.

In 2017, Cooperative Extension provided the citizens of Alamance County educational information on the objectives; Profitable and Sustainable Agricultural Systems, Healthy Eating, Physical Activity and Chronic Disease Risk Reduction, School to Career, Leadership Development, Volunteerism, Local Food Systems, Urban and Consumer Agriculture.

The Master Gardener program graduated its first class in Alamance County in 2002, and have conducted a new class about every other year. In 2017, 21 new Extension Master Gardener Volunteers (EMGVs) graduated their initial training and began working alongside the veteran EMGVs in various roles, with Arbor Gate Teaching Garden getting most of their attention. The garden surrounds three sides of the Agricultural Building and is used as a teaching tool by Cooperative Extension for the public. In 2017, raised beds were added to the vegetable garden area to make these beds more accessible to people with physical limitations. Through their efforts, the value of their time and financial support the county has received more than $90,000 of in-kind services during 2017 from the Extension Master Gardener Volunteers.

Commercial pesticide applicators are licensed by NCDA&CS. They are required to receive 10 hours of recertification training over a five year period. Applicators that do not receive the required recertification hours must re-take the licensing exam or forfeit their license. The loss of the pesticide license can lead to a significant reduction in revenue for a commercial applicator. In an effort to help local applicators receive their recertification hours, two two-hour pesticide training classes were held in December 2017. A total of 175 recertification hours was earned through this class. The wages preserved by this commercial pesticide applicator recertification class are estimated to be over $500,000.

Many Alamance County citizens aren’t familiar with the Cooperative Extension Service (CES), or the services that CES provides. In an effort to increase awareness of CES, Alamance County staff members partnered with Communication students from Elon University to create a strategic social media campaign. The Alamance County CES staff recognized the potential impact that social media could have on new and current audiences. Several years ago the staff kicked off a social media campaign on Facebook. Social media offers an excellent opportunity to reach a wide audience. Facebook alone has 552 million active daily users and one out of every seven minutes spent online is spent on Facebook. Every week day, a staff member provides a Facebook post relating to their area of expertise, including nutrition, horticulture, youth development, livestock, and field crops. On Friday, staff members rotate asking fun questions or sharing interesting facts about their field. Since the beginning of this campaign, Alamance County has seen tremendous growth in social media reach. The number of Facebook fans has increased from 56 to 312. The number of people who view daily tips and facts has increased from nearly nothing to over 800 people. People have begun asking questions via Facebook messaging and commenting on posts, to which the staff always responds. Alamance County CES plans to continue using social media as another avenue to reach their audience with research, evidence-based information as well as exploring other social media outlets.

II. County Background

Alamance County is in the Piedmont Region of North Carolina. North Carolina is one of the fastest growing states in the United States and Alamance County is a rapidly growing area because of the low tax rates and easy access to Triad and Triangle cities. The population of 150,000 continues to grow. The citizens have recognized one major attraction to the county is the open space versus continued uncontrolled development that would make the county a less desirable place to live. Rural areas of the county continue to have active farming operations. The county still has the traditional farming enterprises but smaller farms are on the increase. Some of the farms are part-time ventures and some are lifestyle farms producing vegetables and meat. Some of these new small farmers have made a decision to change their lifestyle by moving to the farm and living on a few acres producing vegetables, flowers, eggs and meat.

The Cooperative Extension office started the environmental scanning by surveying the specialized committees that the agents had in place. This gave us a grassroots look at what the specialized groups were concerned with in the county. These groups included; youth, school groups, farmers, health educators, food industry personnel, horticultural groups and non-farm groups. This information was compiled and the County Advisory Leadership group looked at the issues and ranked them as they saw the importance to the county. After the Advisory Leadership members ranked the issues the Cooperative Extension staff reviewed their recommendations to see how they lined up with the state objectives.

The major county issues identified by the citizens of Alamance County to be addressed by the Extension staff in 2017 are:

Profitable and Sustainable Agricultural Systems

School to Career

Leadership Development

Local Food Systems

Urban and Consumer Agriculture


Extension will use research based information to address these issues identified by the citizens of the county. Extension will work with specialists at NC State and A&T State University to obtain research based information. We will partner with county citizens, county government, other state and county agencies to bring educational information to citizens of the county and state. Volunteers will also be an important group of people to help with these issues since they work with youth, serve on many committees, give many hours of volunteer work in the Master Gardener program, allow on-farm tests on their property just to name a few activities they help with. Extension will do educational programming to address these issues, help citizens identify plant and animal problems and offer solutions to these problems. Youth will be offered the opportunity to learn life skills through educational programs, camps and specialized learning opportunities. Healthy lifestyles, including proper diets, safe food production and preparation will be addressed.

We will use the following methods to disseminate information to citizens of North Carolina and Alamance County; newsletters, newspaper articles, local radio, Facebook, emails, telephone consultations, home and/or farm consultations, local and area meetings, demonstrations and on-farm tests. We will also work with other organizations to help improve the lives of our citizens.

III. Objectives to Address the Cooperative Extension Long Range Plan

North Carolina's plant production systems will become more profitable and sustainable.

Value* Outcome Description
230Number of crop (all plant systems) producers increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, and/or skills as related to: 1. Best management production practices (cultural, nutrient, and genetics) 2. Pest/insect, disease, weed, wildlife management 3. Financial/Farm management tools and practices (business, marketing, government policy, human resources) 4. Alternative agriculture, bioenergy, and value-added enterprises
12Number of Extension initiated and controlled County demonstration test sites (new required for GLF/PSI reporting)
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
167Number of crop (all plant systems) producers adopting best management practices, including those practices related to nutrient management, conservation, production, cultivars, pest management (weeds, diseases, insects), business management, and marketing
1075Net income gains realized by the adoption of best management practices, including those practices related to nutrient management, conservation, production, cultivars, pest management (weeds, diseases, insects), business management, and marketing
115Number of producers reporting increased dollar returns per acre or reduced costs per acre
60Number of producers reporting reduction in fertilizer used per acre
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Youth and adults will address community issues and/or challenges through volunteerism.

North Carolina's animal production systems will become more profitable and sustainable.

Value* Outcome Description
189Number of animal producers increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, and/or skills as related to: 1. Best management production practices (cultural, nutrient, and genetics) 2. Pest/insect, disease, weed, wildlife management 3. Financial/Farm management tools and practices (business, marketing, government policy, human resources) 4. Alternative agriculture, bioenergy, and value-added enterprises
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
189Number of animal producers adopting Extension-recommended best management practices, including those practices related to husbandry, improved planning, marketing, and financial practices
101228Net income gains by producers adopting Extension-recommended best management practices, including those practices related to husbandry, improved planning, marketing, and financial practices
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Youth and adult program participants will make healthy food choices, achieve the recommended amount of physical activity and reduce risk factors for chronic diseases.

Producers will increase sales of food locally to more agriculturally aware consumers through market development, producer and consumer education, and new farmer and infrastructure support.

Value* Outcome Description
28Number of producers who gain skills or knowledge to increase production for local markets.
222Number of adults (including producers, food business owners, etc.) who improved knowledge of local food and agricultural systems.
871Number of children/youth who improved knowledge of local food and agricultural systems.
245Number of individuals who gain knowledge or acquire skills related to vegetable/fruit gardening, and if also reporting under Urban and Consumer Agriculture Objective, divide up the reported number appropriately between the two objectives to avoid duplication.
19Number of producers who improve local food marketing skills or knowledge.
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
9Number of new and existing access points for consumers that expand or improve their offering of local fruits and vegetables. Access points include farmers markets, retail stores, school food programs, community gardens, institutions other than schools (e.g. hospitals, universities, etc.), and other systems/access points not noted (e.g. restaurants, etc.).
43Number of producers selling their agricultural products to local markets (direct, intermediated/food service, institutional) for consumption in NC.
10Number of producers who diversified their marketing strategies into local markets (direct, intermediated/food service, institutional).
133000Gross sales of local foods by producers. (Increase in gross sales to be calculated at the state level.)
25Number of producers (and other members of the local food supply chain) who have increased revenue.
6Number of new farms (beginning farmers) selling into local markets for local consumption (in this reporting period).
181Number of individuals who grow food in community gardens.
1500Number of pounds of local foods donated for consumption by vulnerable populations.
425Number of youth who grow food in school gardens.
125Number of individuals who begin home food production by starting a vegetable and/or fruit garden, and if also reporting under Urban and Consumer Horticulture Objective, divide up the reported number appropriately between the two objectives to avoid duplication.
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Individuals and groups will acquire leadership and decision making capacities needed to guide and actively participate in local and state organizations.

Value* Outcome Description
105Number of adults increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
105Number of adults assuming new/expanded leadership roles in the community
1374Number of youth increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
1374Number of youth assuming new/expanded leadership roles in the community
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
105Number of adults increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
105Number of adults assuming new/expanded leadership roles in the community
1374Number of youth increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
1374Number of youth assuming new/expanded leadership roles in the community
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Futures that Work: School to Career Pathways

Value* Outcome Description
40Number of teachers trained in 4-H STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) curriculum
1049Number of youth (students) increasing knowledge in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math)
552Total number of female participants in STEM program
74Number of high school age youth (students) participating as members of 4-H clubs
1049Number of youth (students) increasing knowledge of career/employability skills
40Number of adults increasing knowledge of career/employability skills
74Number of youth (students) increasing knowledge of entrepreneurship
40Number of adults increasing knowledge of entrepreneurship
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
40Number of teachers using 4-H STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) curriculum in their classrooms
1049Number of youth (students) gaining knowledge in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math)
1049Number of youth (students) gaining career / employability skills
40Number of adults gaining career / employability skills
74Number of youth (students) gaining entrepreneurship skills
40Number of adults gaining entrepreneurship skills
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Consumers and communities will enhance the value of plants, animals, and landscapes while conserving valuable natural resources and protecting the environment.

Value* Outcome Description
360Number of participants improving knowledge, attitude, skills and aspirations regarding gardening and landscape practices including plant selection and placement, turfgrass management, soil management, growing food, water conservation and water quality preservation, storm water and erosion management, green waste management, pest and wildlife management
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
345Number of participants who use extension-recommended best management practices in landscapes, turf, and gardens, including pest (insect, weed, disease) management, fertility management, water conservation, water quality preservation and pruning techniques
11500Total cost savings from the use of extension-recommended best management practices in landscapes, turf, and gardens, including pest (insect, weed, disease) management, fertility management, water conservation, water quality preservation and pruning techniques
120Number of participants who use extension-recommended pest management practices in homes, public facilities, businesses or in community pest management programs
9000Cost savings from using extension-recommended pest management practices in homes, public facilities, businesses or in community pest management programs
265Number of participants selecting appropriate landscape plants (adapted, drought tolerant, appropriate size, etc.)
5000Cost savings from the appropriate selection of landscape plants
130Number of participants growing food for home consumption
4250Value of produce grown for home consumption
90Number of participants adopting composting
6Reduced tonnage of greenwaste as a result of Extension-recommended practices including composting and proper plant selection
147Number of participants implementing extension-recommended practices to conserve water use and protect water qualty
3000Costs savings from implementing extension-recommended practices to conserve water use and protect water qualtiy
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

IV. Number of Contacts Made by Extension

Type of ContactNumber
Face-to-face* 14,759
Non face-to-face** 65,156
Total by Extension staff in 2017 79,915
* Face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make directly with individuals through one-on-one visits, meetings, and other activities where staff members work directly with individuals.
** Non face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make indirectly with individuals by telephone, email, newsletters, news articles, radio, television, and other means.

V. Designated Grants Received by Extension

Type of GrantAmount
Contracts/Grants $0.00
Gifts/Donations $5,400.00
In-Kind Grants/Donations $840.00
United Way/Foundations $72.00
User Fees $60.00
Total $6,372.00

VI. Volunteer Involvement in Extension Programs

Number of Volunteers* Number of Volunteer Hours Known client contacts by volunteers Dollar Value at 24.69
4-H: 1,974 3,942 3,840 $ 97,328.00
Advisory Leadership System: 135 224 676 $ 5,531.00
Extension Community Association: 0 0 0 $ 0.00
Extension Master Gardener: 668 4,688 2,000 $ 115,747.00
Other: 11 46 496 $ 1,136.00
Total: 2788 8900 7012 $ 219,741.00
* The number of volunteers reflects the overall number of volunteers for multiple events.

VII. Membership of Advisory Leadership System

County Advisory Leadership System
Gerry Cohn
Dorothy Humble
Wayne Bunting
Jackie Cole
Dick Fisher
Dr. Ralph Houser
Carl Carroll
William Lock
Steve Love
Ruby Manning
Clay Smith
Angelo Enoch
Martha Jacoby
Brenda Morris
Emogene Wallace
Pam King
Aeriel Miller
Marta McKensie


Field Crops Specialized Committee
Bill Covington
Douglas Smith
Carrie Burnette
Robert Saunders
Buster Sykes Demonstration Farm specialized Committee
Rett Davis
Bill Locke
Jackie Cole
Dick Fisher
Eugene Jordan
Keith Brady
4-H Advisory Board
Jenny Faulkner
Devlin Adams
Terry Isley
Tonja Walker
Stephen Byrd
Elizabeth Kenney
Laurie Newlin

Voluntary Agricultural District
Charles Ansell
Chris Murray
Greg Huffine
Bill Miller
Paul Walker
Charles Newlin
Steve Love

Livestock Specialized Committee
Janis Ansell
Frank Bell
Allison Cooper
Tracy Franklin
Carla Kirby
Brad Moore
Steve Sifford
Dr. John Parks
John Crawford
Lindsay Riddell
Consumer Horticulture Specialized Committee
Linda Humble
Dot Humble
Nan Schaller
Margaret Egede-Nissen
Joan Drummond
Miriam Jernigan
Linda Nunemaker
Ann Wooten
Liz Wells
Jennell Harris
Judy Driscoll
Susan Owen
Ginny Dziadosz
Linda Douglas
Marti Lipsky
Beef Cattle Specialized Committee
Ken Culberson
Johnny Massey
Randall Smith
Frank Bell
Kenny Owens
Jonathan Massey
Leo Boswell
Larry Isley
Jim Roney

VIII. Staff Membership

Mark Danieley
Title: County Extension Director & Extension Agent, Agriculture - Horticulture
Phone: (336) 570-6740
Email: mark_danieley@ncsu.edu

Daniel Campeau
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Poultry
Phone: (919) 542-8202
Email: dan_campeau@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Work mainly with Commercial Poultry industry. I also work with small scale poultry production. Service area is now the North Central District from Guilford to Halifax with the southern edge being Chatham and Wake county respectively.

Dwayne Dabbs
Title: Extension Agent, Agriculture - Field Crops, Pesticide Coordinator
Phone: (336) 570-6740
Email: dcdabbs@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provide educational programs and answer questions pertaining to Field Crops in Alamance County, and provide Pesticide Applicators programs to earn re-certification credits.

Marti Day
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Dairy
Phone: (919) 542-8202
Email: marti_day@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Responsible for educational programs for dairy farmers, youth with an interest in dairy projects and the general public with an interest in dairy foods and the dairy industry.

Erin Eure
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Commercial Fruits & Vegetables
Phone: (252) 357-1400
Email: erin_eure@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provides educational opportunities and technical support to commercial fruit and vegetable growers, agents, and industry in northeastern NC.

Eleanor Frederick
Title: Extension Agent, Family and Consumer Sciences
Phone: (336) 570-6740
Email: eleanor_frederick@ncsu.edu

Marissa Herchler
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Animal Food Safety (FSMA Programs)
Phone: (919) 515-5396
Email: marissa_herchler@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Marissa is an Area Specialized Agent for animal food safety, with emphasis on the new Food Safety Modernization Act rules, as they apply to feed mills in North Carolina. Please contact Marissa with any FSMA related questions, or PCQI training inquiries.

Beverly Jenkins
Title: County Extension Administrative Assistant
Phone: (336) 570-6740
Email: beverly_jenkins@ncsu.edu

Lynette Johnston
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Food Safety
Phone: (919) 515-0303
Email: lynette_johnston@ncsu.edu

Stacey Jones
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Commercial Nursery and Greenhouse
Phone: (704) 920-3310
Email: stacey_jones@ncsu.edu

Taylor Jones
Title: Extension Agent, 4-H Youth Development
Phone: (336) 570-6740
Email: taylor_jones@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provide positive programs and educational opportunities to youth ages 5 through 18 in Alamance County.

Lauren Langley
Title: Extension Agent, Agriculture - Livestock and Forages
Phone: (336) 570-6740
Email: lauren_langley@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Responsibilities include livestock, forages, and youth livestock.

Bill Lord
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Water Resources
Phone: (919) 496-3344
Email: william_lord@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Water quality education and technical assistance

Rachel McDowell
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Consumer and Retail Food Safety
Phone: (919) 515-9155
Email: romcdowe@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Support FCS Agents in delivering timely and evidence-based food safety education and information to stakeholders in NC.

Cynthia Pierce
Title: County Extension Support Specialist
Phone: (336) 570-6740
Email: cynthia_pierce@ncsu.edu

Chip Simmons
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Food Safety
Phone: (919) 414-5632
Email: odsimmon@ncsu.edu

Christine Stecker
Title: Horticulture Technician
Phone: (336) 570-6740
Email: christine.stecker@alamance-nc.com

Mitch Woodward
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Watersheds and Water Quality
Phone: (919) 250-1112
Email: mdwoodwa@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: NC Cooperative Extension's Goals include: - NC's natural resources and environmental quality will be protected, conserved and enhanced. - NC will have profitable, environmentally sustainable plant, animal and food systems. Protecting our environmental resources, particularly drinking water quality, is a top priority in NC. NC Cooperative Extension is a leader in teaching, researching, and accelerating the adoption of effective water quality protection practices.

IX. Contact Information

Alamance County Center
209-C N Graham-Hopedale Rd
Burlington, NC 27217

Phone: (336) 570-6740
Fax: (336) 570-6689
URL: http://alamance.ces.ncsu.edu