2018 EBCI Program Impact Report

Approved: January 30, 2019

I. Executive Summary

For the first time in over five years the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians North Carolina Cooperative Extension Office was fully staffed in 2018. This was an important accomplishment which allowed staff to focus on their program areas and thus resulted in many successes for the year.

For the first time in over 5 years the 4-H Program had youth participating in District Activity Day. The EBCI had two place and in turn made the trip to Raleigh for State Competition. Both received a silver medal. Through the end of 2018 we have seen the 4-H Program grow by leaps and bounds. The public speaking, communication, education, and leadership skills learned through the 4-H Program and through competition will prove very valuable as these young people grow. They will be the future leaders of our community. The 4-H Program is providing school enrichment to Cherokee Central Schools and New Kituwah Academy, this first year being the popular embryology curriculum.

2018 was an important year in regards to Local Food Systems Development and Education. New partnerships and customer groups were created. They are: The Domestic Violence Shelter, Juvenile Services Program, MotherTown Healing Group(Substance & Behavioral Rehabilitation through gardening and work force development), Dialysis Center, Tsali Care Assisted Living Facility, Kituwah Academy(Cherokee Language Immersion for children 6 months to 6th grade), Cherokee Youth Center, and Children’s Home(Foster Care Facility). Education through workshops, one-on-one tutelage, demonstrations, and community work projects were conducted with all groups listed. The focus for 2018 was culturally significant plants and home gardening. With the Qualla Boundary having limited farm land, the construction of raised beds and alternative planting techniques are a focus. In 2018 raised beds were constructed at each group's facility.

The EBCI Cooperative Extension FCS Program provided nutritional education by conducting the Teen Cuisine Summer Nutrition Program at the Recreation Summer Camps and Cherokee Youth Center. A total of 143 students received education on nutrition, food safety, and some cooking skills. The program also utilized 3 youth ages 13-14 to aide in instruction. They received training and then helped facilitate the program. FCS also facilitated the Speedway to Healthy Program at Cherokee Central Schools. This was a 1,200 square foot exhibit that represented the human body with students able to have hands on learning as they traveled through the exhibit. A total of 561 students went through this exhibit.

Natural Resources for the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians has historically always had a high degree of focus. The Qualla Boundary has limited access to native greens for harvesting, however is surrounded by the Great Smoky Mountains National Park and Blue Ridge Parkway. The EBCI Natural Resources Program began talks with the Federal Government and National Parks to discuss the possibility of Tribal Members being allowed to forage on park land. A committee was formed made up of professionals in various natural resource fields to submit a plan to propose the foraging of sochan. Sochan is a commonly referred to as the Green Cone Flower. This is a historically important wild green used by the Cherokee. Area Specialized Agent Dr. David Cozzo of the EBCI Extension Office served on the committee. After a great deal of research and education, the National Park and EBCI has agreed to a forage agreement for sochan beginning in 2019. The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians North Carolina Cooperative Extension Office provides workshops and educational programming during events to demonstrate the proper identification and harvesting of native foods.

II. County Background

The land owned by the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians (EBCI) is located in the Appalachian Mountains of Western North Carolina. EBCI lands are fragmented into numerous parcels scattered across four of the most remote and mountainous counties in North Carolina. These counties are Swain, Jackson, Graham, and Cherokee. The United States Government holds the land in trust for the EBCI. The largest tract is the Qualla Boundary, where the town of Cherokee is located. Cherokee is a gateway community to the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Tribal government, tribal services and the Cherokee Extension office are centered in the town of Cherokee. The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians operates under a corporate charter granted by the State of North Carolina.

EBCI Extension receives guidance from Tribal Leadership which includes: Principal Chief Richard Sneed, Vice Chief Alan B. Ensley, and Tribal Council (12 elected officials, two from each of the 6 main Tribal Communities). This Tribal Leadership, along with Tribal Program Directors and Managers also participate in USET(United Southeastern Tribes). This group has an Agricultural Committee. The Committee's Priorities included the following: a desire to re-establish knowledge of traditional agricultural skills, crops, and native plants resources; leadership, personal development and citizenship skills for all ages; education about the current agricultural trends and new marketing opportunities; food and nutrition decisions; education about home maintenance, home improvement, energy conservation and alternative energy; and financial education. The priorities address tribal issues and concerns.

III. Objectives to Address the Cooperative Extension Long Range Plan

Producers will increase sales of food locally to more agriculturally aware consumers through market development, producer and consumer education, and new farmer and infrastructure support.

Value* Outcome Description
50Number of producers who gain skills or knowledge to increase production for local markets.
137Number of adults (including producers, food business owners, etc.) who improved knowledge of local food and agricultural systems.
597Number of children/youth who improved knowledge of local food and agricultural systems.
970Number of individuals who gain knowledge or acquire skills related to vegetable/fruit gardening, and if also reporting under Urban and Consumer Agriculture Objective, divide up the reported number appropriately between the two objectives to avoid duplication.
5Number of producers who improve local food marketing skills or knowledge.
334Number of individuals who learn how to prepare local foods, including through use of home food preservation techniques.
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
2Number of new and existing access points for consumers that expand or improve their offering of local fruits and vegetables. Access points include farmers markets, retail stores, school food programs, community gardens, institutions other than schools (e.g. hospitals, universities, etc.), and other systems/access points not noted (e.g. restaurants, etc.).
15Number of producers selling their agricultural products to local markets (direct, intermediated/food service, institutional) for consumption in NC.
15Number of producers who diversified their marketing strategies into local markets (direct, intermediated/food service, institutional).
5Number of producers (and other members of the local food supply chain) who have increased revenue.
2Number of new farms (beginning farmers) selling into local markets for local consumption (in this reporting period).
3Number of new local food value chain businesses, other than farms (in this reporting period).
110Number of individuals who grow food in community gardens.
6000Number of pounds of local foods donated for consumption by vulnerable populations.
490Number of youth who grow food in school gardens.
1150Number of individuals who begin home food production by starting a vegetable and/or fruit garden, and if also reporting under Urban and Consumer Horticulture Objective, divide up the reported number appropriately between the two objectives to avoid duplication.
35Number of individuals who begin home food production by starting to raise backyard livestock.
6000Number of pounds of fresh produce donated for consumption by vulnerable populations.
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Individuals and groups will acquire leadership and decision making capacities needed to guide and actively participate in local and state organizations.

Value* Outcome Description
2Number of adults increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
2Number of adults assuming new/expanded leadership roles in the community
53Number of youth increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
3Number of youth assuming new/expanded leadership roles in the community
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
2Number of adults increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
2Number of adults assuming new/expanded leadership roles in the community
53Number of youth increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
2Number of youth assuming new/expanded leadership roles in the community
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Community members, organizations and local government will engage in collaborative dialog and decision-making to build economically, socially and environmentally resilient communities. This will be done through inclusive engagement, partnership building, and/or community planning.

Value* Outcome Description
48Number of participants increasing knowledge and skills in convening and leading inclusive, representative groups (including limited resources, new resident, or immigrant groups) for evidence based community development
586Number of participants developing skills in leading community, economic, and/or disaster planning and change
10Number of communities that have included agricultural and food system considerations into disaster preparedness plans or procedures due to Extension’s involvement
50Number of residents that increase their knowledge in disaster preparedness planning, mitigation and recovery
586Number of participants who increased their awareness, knowledge or skill in business related topics (e.g., management, product development, marketing, business structure options, business law and/or liability)
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
4Number of businesses created, retained, or expanded due to Extension’s community and economic development programming
7Number of local food councils in which Extension is involved
48Number of participants who adopted disaster preparedness and mitigation practices
36Number of participants who report new or expanded leadership roles and opportunities undertaken
221622Dollar value of in-kind resources (funding, in-kind service or volunteers) contributed to Projects or Programs in which Extension was critically involved by an organization or community to support community or economic development work
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Adults and youth will apply financial management practices to increase their economic security, which include to: meet basic necessities, increase savings, reduce debt, and build long-term assets.

Value* Outcome Description
4Number of people gaining basic financial management knowledge and/or skills (such as; budgeting, record keeping, goal setting, writing goals, consumer decision-making)
6Number of people gaining knowledge and/or skills in managing financial products and financial identity (such as; credit, debt management, identify theft, credit reports and scores, scams, banking skills)
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Futures that Work: School to Career Pathways

Value* Outcome Description
6Number of teachers trained in 4-H STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) curriculum
90Number of youth (students) increasing knowledge in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math)
50Total number of female participants in STEM program
3Number of high school age youth (students) participating as members of 4-H clubs
3Number of youth (students) increasing knowledge of career/employability skills
1Number of adults increasing knowledge of career/employability skills
90Number of youth (students) increasing knowledge of entrepreneurship
2Number of adults increasing knowledge of entrepreneurship
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
1Number of teachers using 4-H STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) curriculum in their classrooms
50Number of youth (students) gaining knowledge in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math)
3Number of youth (students) gaining career / employability skills
1Number of adults gaining career / employability skills
90Number of youth (students) gaining entrepreneurship skills
2Number of adults gaining entrepreneurship skills
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

North Carolinians will make decisions and adopt practices that implement effective resource protection and conservation.

Value* Outcome Description
1208Number of participants increasing their knowledge about best management practices
36Number of child and youth educators aspiring to implement quality outdoor learning environments for children
1250Number of youth and adults demonstrating increased knowledge of natural resources and environmental issues
450Number of youth willing to participate in conservation actions
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
50Number of participants that adopted recommended climate adaption strategies for production agriculture or natural resource management, including for invasive species, pest management, pollutant loads, and wetlands.
350Number of acres under recommended climate adaption strategies for production agriculture or natural resource management, including for invasive species, pest management, pollutant loads, and wetlands.
50Number of participants that adopted recommended climate mitigation practices such as water-use efficiency, livestock production feeding practices, carbon sequestration, reducing carbon or energy footprint.
350Number of acres under recommended climate mitigation practices such as water-use efficiency, livestock production feeding practices, carbon sequestration, reducing carbon or energy footprint.
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Youth and adult program participants will make healthy food choices, achieve the recommended amount of physical activity and reduce risk factors for chronic diseases.

Value* Impact Description
94Number of youth increasing their fruit and vegetable consumption
146Number of participants increasing their physical activity
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

IV. Number of Contacts Made by Extension

Type of ContactNumber
Face-to-face* 16,510
Non face-to-face** 51,196
Total by Extension staff in 2018 67,706
* Face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make directly with individuals through one-on-one visits, meetings, and other activities where staff members work directly with individuals.
** Non face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make indirectly with individuals by telephone, email, newsletters, news articles, radio, television, and other means.

V. Designated Grants Received by Extension

Type of GrantAmount
Contracts/Grants $613,753.00
Gifts/Donations $65.00
In-Kind Grants/Donations $1,200.00
United Way/Foundations $0.00
User Fees $100.00
Total $615,118.00

VI. Volunteer Involvement in Extension Programs

Number of Volunteers* Number of Volunteer Hours Known client contacts by volunteers Dollar Value at 24.69
4-H: 60 750 450 $ 18,518.00
Advisory Leadership System: 0 0 0 $ 0.00
Extension Community Association: 0 0 0 $ 0.00
Extension Master Gardener: 0 0 0 $ 0.00
Other: 462 5,424 4,789 $ 133,919.00
Total: 522 6174 5239 $ 152,436.00
* The number of volunteers reflects the overall number of volunteers for multiple events.

VII. Membership of Advisory Leadership System

Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians Advisory Council
Committee is being restructured

VIII. Staff Membership

Chumper Walker
Title: County Extension Director
Phone: (828) 359-6930
Email: chumper_walker@ncsu.edu

David Cozzo
Title: Area Specialized Agent
Phone: (828) 359-6856
Email: david_cozzo@ncsu.edu

Sally Dixon
Title: Extension Agent, 4-H Youth Development
Phone: (828) 359-6939
Email: srdixon@ncsu.edu

Tracie Edwards
Title: County Extension Administrative Assistant
Phone: (828) 359-6939
Email: tracie_edwards@ncsu.edu

Lauren Greene
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Poultry
Phone: (336) 651-7347
Email: lauren_greene@ncsu.edu

Marissa Herchler
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Animal Food Safety (FSMA Programs)
Phone: (919) 515-5396
Email: marissa_herchler@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Marissa is an Area Specialized Agent for animal food safety, with emphasis on the new Food Safety Modernization Act rules, as they apply to feed mills in North Carolina. Please contact Marissa with any FSMA related questions, or PCQI training inquiries.

Bill Lord
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Water Resources
Phone: (919) 496-3344
Email: william_lord@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Water quality education and technical assistance

Currey Nobles
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Food Safety
Phone: (919) 515-9520
Email: canobles@ncsu.edu

Janet Owle
Title: Extension Agent, Family and Consumer Sciences
Phone: (828) 359-6937
Email: janet_owle@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: EBCI-Extension Agent, Family and Consumer Sciences

Elena Rogers
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Food Safety - Fresh Produce Western NC
Phone: (828) 352-2519
Email: elena_rogers@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provide educational programs, training and technical support focusing on fresh produce safety to Agents and growers in Western NC.

Debbie Stroud
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Consumer and Retail Food Safety
Phone: (919) 515-9149
Email: dlstroud@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Area Specialized Agents in Consumer and Retail Food Safety help to ensure that Family and Consumer Sciences (FCS) Agents have access to timely, evidence-based food safety information. This is accomplished by (1) working with FCS Agents in their counties, (2) developing food safety materials and (3) planning and implementing a NC Safe Plates Food Safety Info Center.

Skip Thompson
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Aquaculture
Phone: (828) 456-3575
Email: Skip_Thompson@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provide educational opportunities and technical support to the trout and carp aquaculture industries in 42 counties and the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians (EBCI) in western North Carolina. Fish health, production management, and waste management educational programs will assist trout farmers, fee-fishing pond managers, carp ponds and trout fingerling producers with the management and sustainability of their facilities.

Mitch Woodward
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Watersheds and Water Quality
Phone: (919) 250-1112
Email: mdwoodwa@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: NC Cooperative Extension's Goals include: - NC's natural resources and environmental quality will be protected, conserved and enhanced. - NC will have profitable, environmentally sustainable plant, animal and food systems. Protecting our environmental resources, particularly drinking water quality, is a top priority in NC. NC Cooperative Extension is a leader in teaching, researching, and accelerating the adoption of effective water quality protection practices.

IX. Contact Information