2019 Burke County Program Impact Report

Approved: January 14, 2020

I. Executive Summary

In 2019 N.C. Cooperative Extension, Burke County Center staff utilized a network of advisors and volunteers to assess needs and deliver impactful, research based programming designed to improve the quality of life for Burke County citizens.

N.C. Cooperative Extension, Burke County Center staff delivered over 100 educational programs and provided face-to-face education and assistance to 41,506 citizens and an additional 90,000 citizens through digital media and non-face to face interactions. Burke Extension volunteers donated approx. 6,000 hours of service with an estimated value of volunteer contributions at $145,000. Fundraising, grants and community contributions for program enhancement in 2019 totaled $56,000.

Major initiatives identified as critical by advisory leaders and a local needs assessment included a focus on healthy eating, physical activity and chronic disease reduction; local foods, youth; community & volunteer development; profitable and sustainable agriculture; and urban and consumer horticulture. Numbers and impacts can be seen in the following report.

However, here is a glimpse of a few of the specific highlights for 2019:

* Farm-City Week is a way of bringing increased awareness of agriculture to the citizens of Burke County. The N.C. Cooperative Extension staff presented a program and panel discussion with 5 local farmers who explained their farming businesses to approx. 80 interested attendees from around the county. Attendees were able to ask questions of the farmers and learn about the many types of agriculture that help support our county. This event was open to everyone in Burke County.

* The Empowering Youth and Families Program (EYFP) focuses on opioid prevention education for youth ages 10-14 and their caregivers in Burke County. The goals of this program is to reduce youth substance use, improve parenting skills of caregivers, improve family relationships, and empower families to lead community change to leverage support for healthier lifestyles within those communities. In 2019, Burke County kicked off this program with 5 families graduating in November.

* Over 400 youth at Salem Elementary School had the opportunity to experience the "farm" at their own school. Burke County Extension Agents and support staff manned stations for the classrooms to rotate through Farm to School Day. Stations consisted of live animals to view (cattle and sheep) while current 4-H'ers shared their animals' information and fun facts, how to milk a cow (man made milking cow for demonstrations) while learning dairy facts, parts of plants/flowers and foods from the garden and yoga (fun farm animal poses).

N.C. Cooperative Extension, Burke County Center continues to offer a diverse program focused on improving the lives, land and economy of all Burke citizens.

II. County Background

We are delighted to introduce you to the magnificent beauty, hospitality, cultural diversity and business resources of one of the most vibrant areas in Western North Carolina.

Burke County nestled in the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains, with Morganton as its county seat, is the perfect place to live, work, play, raise a family, retire, and most of all, enjoy life. It is that special place where you can enjoy living at your own pace. There are entrepreneurial opportunities for those wishing to operate their own businesses, a four season climate with mild year-round temperatures, and unlimited recreational opportunities that range from leisurely walks on the Catawba Greenway, boating and sailing on the pristine waters of Lake James, to strenuous rock climbing in the Linville Gorge.

Burke County has about 324,320 acres and has a population of 90,912 (census 2010). The largest landowners in Burke County are the U.S. Government, Crescent Resources (Duke Energy Co.), and the State of North Carolina.

Cooperative Extension staff in Burke County worked with the Advisory Leadership Council to prioritize the needs of the county citizens and selected to continue to address the following objectives:

• Animal & Plant Production
* Family & Consumer Sciences
• 4-H Youth Development
• Consumer Horticulture
• Community Development
• Food Safety & Nutrition

N. C. Cooperative Extension staff in Burke County will design, implement and evaluate educational programming in the identified areas to bring about positive change for the citizens of Burke County.

III. Objectives to Address the Cooperative Extension Long Range Plan

Our family and consumer sciences programs improve the well-being of individuals, families, and communities.

Value* Outcome Description
383Number of adults increasing their knowledge of community resources
19Number of adults and professionals increasing their knowledge of human development over the life course and emerging best practices in parenting and caregiving
19Number of parents and other caregivers of children increasing their knowledge of positive parenting practices (such as communication and discipline)
57Number of people gaining knowledge and/or skills to increase family economic security (such as; how to access: SNAP benefits, SHIIP Medicare Part D; food cost management, cost comparison skills, shop for reverse mortgages, select long term care insurance, etc.)
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Our natural resource and environmental programs conserve our precious natural resources and maintain a clean and healthy environment.

Our plant production programs improve production, profitability, and sustainability of the agriculture sector.

Value* Outcome Description
47Number of producers who gain skills or knowledge to increase production for local markets.
43Number of producers who improve local food marketing skills or knowledge.
238Number of pesticide applicators receiving continuing education credits
16Number of pesticide credit hours provided
149Number of crop (all plant systems) producers increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, and/or skills as related to: 1. Best management production practices (cultural, nutrient, and genetics) 2. Pest/insect, disease, weed, wildlife management 3. Financial/Farm management tools and practices (business, marketing, government policy, human resources) 4. Alternative agriculture, bioenergy, and value-added enterprises
2Number of Extension initiated and controlled county demonstration test sites
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
9Number of producers who diversified their marketing strategies into local markets (direct, intermediated/food service, institutional).
137Number of producers (and other members of the local food supply chain) who have increased revenue
4Number of new farms (beginning farmers) selling into local markets for local consumption (in this reporting period)
213Number of farmers, employees or family members adopting regular use of appropriate PPE following AgriSafe or Certified Safe Farm participation
27Number of participants that have adopted farm safety practices
74Number of producers reporting reduction in fertilizer used per acre
2392Number of acres in conservation tillage or other Best Management Practice
137Number of crop (all plant systems) producers adopting best management practices, including those practices related to nutrient management, conservation, production, cultivars, pest management (weeds, diseases, insects), business management, and marketing
308Tons of feedstock delivered to processor
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Our animal production programs improve production, profitability, and sustainability of the agriculture sector.

Value* Outcome Description
10Number of producers who improve local food marketing skills or knowledge.
8Number of producers who gain skills or knowledge to increase production for local markets.
40Number of animal producers who increased knowledge of farm business management, business planning, financial management, marketing, or estate planning.
30Number of animal producers who learned how to develop a management plan (i.e. grazing plan, feeding plan, drought plan, business plan, disaster plan, etc.)
155Number of producers who increased knowledge of pasture/forage management practices (field improvement, herbicide management, grazing season extension, weed control, forage quality, haylage production, nitrate testing, etc.)
264Number of producers who increased knowledge of nutrition, ration balancing, mineral supplements, breeding, and reproduction
53Number of producers who increased knowledge of the strategies to promote animal health and welfare and reduce the potential for infectious diseases through proper use of vaccines, biosecurity, detection and identification of common diseases, appropriate use of animal medications, and mitigation of antimicrobial resistance transmission
15Number of producers who increased knowledge of animal waste management practices
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
4Number of producers who diversified their marketing strategies into local markets (direct, intermediated/food service, institutional).
3Number of new farms (beginning farmers) selling into local markets for local consumption (in this reporting period)
10Number of producers (and other members of the local food supply chain) who have increased revenue
3Number of participants that have adopted farm safety practices
36Number of farmers, employees or family members adopting regular use of appropriate PPE following AgriSafe or Certified Safe Farm participation
21Number of producers adopting extension-recommended practices related to planning, marketing, and financial management
7Number of producers implementing Extension-recommended best management practices for animal waste management
2170Number of acres where Extension-recommended nutrient applications were used
79Number of producers who adopted Extension-recommended best management practices and production changes related to quality assurance (vaccinations, castration, culling techniques, etc.)
57Number of producers who adopted Extension-recommended best management practices and production changes related to genetic improvement (AI, heifer/bull selection)
98Number of producers who adopted Extension-recommended best management practices and production changes related to nutrition (mineral, feed rations)
24Number of producers who adopted Extension-recommended best management practices and production changes related to internal parasite management (fecals, deworming)
205Number of producers who adopted Extension-recommended best management practices related to pasture management
80Number of producers who adopted Extension-recommended best management practices and production changes related to nutrition, ration balancing, mineral supplement, breeding, and reproduction
5Number of producers using improved biosecurity practices
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Our community development programs build strong and thriving communities.

Value* Outcome Description
833Number of participants who improved knowledge of local food and agricultural systems
26Number of participants who developed new jobs skills
179Number of adult participants acquiring the skills needed to serve as a volunteer
16Number of participants who increased their awareness, knowledge or skill in business related topics (e.g., management, product development, marketing, business structure options, business law and/or liability)
82Number of participants that increase their knowledge of disaster preparedness planning, mitigation and recovery
104Number of participants acquiring knowledge and skills to convene and lead inclusive groups
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
5Number of local food value chain businesses created due to Extension’s programming or technical assistance
5200Dollar value of in-kind resources contributed by organizations or community
5500Value of grants received by organizations, communities, or Extension where Extension was instrumental in initiating, facilitating, or providing technical assistant in the development of the grants to support community or economic development work
2Number of (eg., community and economic development, land use, disaster, etc.) new, revised or adopted plans that have begun to be implemented in communities, organizations, local governments, or businesses
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Our 4-H youth development programs grow the skills young people need to succeed in life and career.

Value* Outcome Description
25Number of teachers trained in 4-H STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) curriculum
1230Number of youth (students) increasing knowledge in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math)
627Total number of female participants in STEM program
15Number of high school age youth (students) participating as members of 4-H clubs
2800Number of youth increasing knowledge of life skills
62Number of children/youth who improved knowledge of local food and agricultural systems.
2800Number of youth increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
465Number of youth demonstrating increased knowledge of natural resources and environmental issues
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
25Number of teachers using 4-H STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) curriculum in their classrooms
65Number of youth (students) gaining career / employability skills
65Number of youth (students) gaining entrepreneurship skills
2800Number of youth using effective life skills
50Number of youth willing to participate in conservation actions
65Number of youth increasing their physical activity
10Number of youth volunteers serving in new or expanded roles within Extension
8Number of youth volunteers serving in new or expanded roles beyond Extension, including community boards and task forces
10Number of youth assuming new/expanded leadership roles in the community
65Number of youth increasing their fruit and vegetable consumption
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Our consumer horticulture programs teach families and communities about environmentally friendly methods for gardening and controlling pests.

Value* Outcome Description
805Number of individuals who gain knowledge or acquire skills related to vegetable/fruit gardening
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
89Number of individuals who grow food in community gardens.
94Number of individuals who begin home food production by starting a vegetable and/or fruit garden
837Number of participants who use extension-recommended best management practices in landscapes, turf, and gardens, including pest (insect, weed, disease, wildlife) and soil management
126Number of participants selecting appropriate landscape plants (adapted, drought tolerant, appropriate size, etc.)
525Number of participants growing food for home consumption
60Number of participants adopting composting
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Our food safety and nutrition programs create a safer and more sustainable food supply and improve the health and nutrition of individuals, families, and our communities.

Value* Outcome Description
264Number of participants who increase their knowledge of safe home food handling, preservation, or preparation practices
44Number of food handlers who increase their knowledge and skills in safe food handling practices
95Number of individuals who learn how to prepare local foods, including through use of home food preservation techniques.
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
51Number of participants developing food safety plans
138Number of adults increasing their fruit and vegetables consumption
138Number of participants increasing their physical activity
138Number of participants who consume less sodium in their diet
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

IV. Number of Contacts Made by Extension

Type of ContactNumber
Face-to-face* 41,506
Non face-to-face** 8,998,929
Total by Extension staff in 2019 9,040,435
* Face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make directly with individuals through one-on-one visits, meetings, and other activities where staff members work directly with individuals.
** Non face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make indirectly with individuals by telephone, email, newsletters, news articles, radio, television, and other means.

V. Designated Grants Received by Extension

Type of GrantAmount
Contracts/Grants $7,500.00
Gifts/Donations $27,000.00
In-Kind Grants/Donations $3,100.00
United Way/Foundations $0.00
User Fees $17,191.86
Total $54,791.86

VI. Volunteer Involvement in Extension Programs

Number of Volunteers* Number of Volunteer Hours Known client contacts by volunteers Dollar Value at 25.43
4-H 353 1419 22235 $ 36,085.00
Advisory Leadership System 74 229 315 $ 5,823.00
Extension Master Gardener 351 1932 1045 $ 49,131.00
Other: Administrative 29 113 104 $ 2,874.00
Other: Agriculture 45 260 7793 $ 6,612.00
Other: Community, Family & Individual Development 273 1744 4233 $ 44,350.00
Other: Food & Nutrition 2 20 42 $ 509.00
Total: 1127 5717 35767 $ 145,383.00
* The number of volunteers reflects the overall number of volunteers for multiple events.

VII. Membership of Advisory Leadership System

Burke County Extension Advisory Council
Wayne Huddleston
Greg Craver
Todd Shuping
Susan Smith
Andrea Gladden
Richard Evey
David Berry
Krista Lail
Kenneth King
Jason Carswell
Chuck Schlein
Rebecca Shuping
Robert Lowman
Charles Wilson
Nick Thompson
Carlton Curoso
Denise Cannon
Lisa Hanlon
Phillip Houk
Burke County 4-H Advisory
Gail Lail
Lou Ella Daniels
Greg Craver
Nick Thompson
Andrea Gladden
Rebecca Shuping
Lisa Hanlon
FCS Program Committee
Mary Jane Frederick
Judy Stevenson
Lisa Moore
Chae Moore
Karen Robinson
Hollie Phillips
Horticulture Program Committee
Denise Cannon
Krista Lail
Johnny Yancey
Charles Wilson
Kenneth King
Livestock, Field Crops & Forestry Program Advisory Committee
Robert Lowman
Billy Parton
Doug Pitts
Randall Brackett
Jeff Houk
Trossie Wall
Phillip Houk
Rebecca Shuping
Naomi Styles
Dallas Miller
Tamara Robinson
Harry Jarrett
Johnny Orders
David Connelly
Birch McMurray

VIII. Staff Membership

Spring Williams-Byrd
Title: County Extension Director
Phone: (828) 764-9480
Email: spring_williams@ncsu.edu

Glenda Burgess
Title: County Extension Administrative Assistant
Phone: (828) 764-9480
Email: glenda_burgess@ncsu.edu

Nicki Carpenter
Title: Extension Agent, 4-H Youth Development
Phone: (828) 764-9480
Email: nicki_carpenter@ncsu.edu

April Dillon
Title: Area Extension Agent, 4-H Youth Development
Phone: (704) 482-4365
Email: april_dillon@ncsu.edu

Lauren Greene
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Poultry
Phone: (336) 651-7347
Email: lauren_greene@ncsu.edu

Tracey Hall
Title: Program Assistant, Empowering Youth and Families
Phone: (828) 764-9480
Email: tlhall6@ncsu.edu

Marissa Herchler
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Animal Food Safety (FSMA Programs)
Phone: (919) 515-5396
Email: marissa_herchler@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Marissa is an Area Specialized Agent for animal food safety, with emphasis on the new Food Safety Modernization Act rules, as they apply to feed mills in North Carolina. Please contact Marissa with any FSMA related questions, or PCQI training inquiries.

Virginia Lopez
Title: Nutrition Educator, SNAP-Ed
Phone: (828) 764-9490
Email: Virginia_Lopez@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Virginia is a Nutrition Educator for NCSU -SNAP-Ed Steps to Health Program She helps educate and inspire limited resource North Carolinians to eat smart and move more through nutrition and food resource management education programs targeting elementary-age children, adults, Latino families, and older adults.

Craig Mauney
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Commercial Vegetables and Fruits
Phone: (828) 684-3562
Email: craig_mauney@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provides educational opportunities, training and technical support to commercial fruit and vegetable growers, agents, and industry in Western NC. (My office is located at the Mountain Horticulture Crops Research and Extension Center not the Henderson County Extension Center as is noted by IT on this website. Please do not contact the Henderson County Extension Center as I am not located there.)

Currey Nobles
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Food Safety
Phone: (919) 515-9520
Email: canobles@ncsu.edu

Damon Pollard
Title: Extension Agent, Agriculture - Livestock, Field Crops and Forestry
Phone: (828) 439-4460
Email: damon_pollard@ncsu.edu

Elena Rogers
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Food Safety - Fresh Produce Western NC
Phone: (828) 352-2519
Email: elena_rogers@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provide educational programs, training and technical support focusing on fresh produce safety to Agents and growers in Western NC.

Dawn Snyder
Title: County Extension Support Specialist
Phone: (828) 764-9480
Email: dawn_snyder@ncsu.edu

Debbie Stroud
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Consumer and Retail Food Safety
Phone: (919) 515-9149
Email: dlstroud@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Area Specialized Agents in Consumer and Retail Food Safety help to ensure that Family and Consumer Sciences (FCS) Agents have access to timely, evidence-based food safety information. This is accomplished by (1) working with FCS Agents in their counties, (2) developing food safety materials and (3) planning and implementing a NC Safe Plates Food Safety Info Center.

Amanda Taylor
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Nursery and Greenhouse, Western Region
Phone: (828) 475-2915
Email: amanda_jo_taylor@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provides programming to commercial nursery and greenhouse producers in Alexander, Alleghany, Ashe, Avery, Buncombe, Burke, Caldwell, Catawba, Cherokee, Clay, Cleveland, Gaston, Graham, Haywood, Henderson, Jackson, Lincoln, Macon, Madison, McDowell, Mitchell, Polk, Rutherford, Swain, Transylvania, Watauga, Wilkes, and Yancey Counties.

Donna Teasley
Title: Extension Agent, Agriculture - Horticulture
Phone: (828) 439-4460
Email: Donna_Teasley@ncsu.edu

Emily Troutman
Title: Extension Agent, Family and Consumer Sciences
Phone: (828) 764-9480
Email: emily_troutman@ncsu.edu

Mitch Woodward
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Watersheds and Water Quality
Phone: (919) 414-3873
Email: mdwoodwa@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: NC Cooperative Extension's Goals include: - NC's natural resources and environmental quality will be protected, conserved and enhanced. - NC will have profitable, environmentally sustainable plant, animal and food systems. Protecting our environmental resources, particularly drinking water quality, is a top priority in NC. NC Cooperative Extension is a leader in teaching, researching, and accelerating the adoption of effective water quality protection practices.

IX. Contact Information

Burke County Center
130 Ammons Dr
Morganton, NC 28655

Phone: (828) 764-9480
Fax: (828) 764-9481
URL: http://burke.ces.ncsu.edu