2018 Burke County Program Impact Report

Approved: January 18, 2019

I. Executive Summary

In 2018 N.C. Cooperative Extension, Burke County Center staff utilized a network of advisors and volunteers to assess needs and deliver impactful, research based programming designed to improve the quality of life for Burke County citizens.

N.C. Cooperative Extension, Burke County Center staff delivered over 150 educational programs and provided face-to-face education and assistance to 54,676 citizens and an additional 92,133 citizens through mass media and non-face to face interactions. Burke Extension volunteers donated approx. 5,000 hours of service with an estimated value of volunteer contributions at $124,000. Fundraising, grants and community contributions for program enhancement in 2018 totaled $60,026.

Major initiatives identified as critical by advisory leaders and a local needs assessment included a focus on healthy eating, physical activity and chronic disease reduction; local foods, youth; community & volunteer development; profitable and sustainable agriculture; and urban and consumer horticulture.

Agriculture programs and visits have touched all aspects of Burke agriculture in 2018, from farms to landscapes and beyond. As a result of Extension programming, participants reported $1,068,715 of net income gains and cost savings by adopting extension-recommended best management practices. In addition, 194 people received pesticide applicator certification.

Family and consumer science programming focused on health and nutrition, and food safety. Speedway to Healthy was provided to approx. 500 Burke County youth participating and more than 30 volunteers assisting with this week-long educational event. While focusing on food safety, a variety of food preservation workshops were provided and 17 participants received Safe Plates Certification.

The Burke County 4-H program continued to offer inquiry based educational programs focused on Science, Engineering, Technology and Math (STEM). Thanks to community donations and support totaling nearly $15,000 to help provide funding and materials for youth and adults participating. Volunteer readiness was also a focus in 2018, with an increase in teen participation and adult volunteers participating in district, state and regional events.

N.C. Cooperative Extension, Burke County Center continues to offer a diverse program focused on improving the lives, land and economy of all Burke citizens.

II. County Background

We are delighted to introduce you to the magnificent beauty, hospitality, cultural diversity and business resources of one of the most vibrant areas in Western North Carolina.

Burke County nestled in the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains, with Morganton as its county seat, is the perfect place to live, work, play, raise a family, retire, and most of all, enjoy life. It is that special place where you can enjoy living at your own pace. There are entrepreneurial opportunities for those wishing to operate their own businesses, a four season climate with mild year-round temperatures, and unlimited recreational opportunities that range from leisurely walks on the Catawba Greenway, boating and sailing on the pristine waters of Lake James, to strenuous rock climbing in the Linville Gorge.

Burke County has about 324,320 acres and has a population of 90,912 (census 2010). The largest landowners in Burke County are the U.S. Government, Crescent Resources (Duke Energy Co.), and the State of North Carolina.

Burke County is ranked 62nd in the state regarding agriculture with over $39 million in cash receipts.

Cooperative Extension staff in Burke County worked with the Advisory Leadership Council to prioritize the needs of the county citizens and selected to continue to address the following objectives:

• Profitable and Sustainable Agriculture Systems
* Safety and Security of our Food and Farm Systems
• School to Career (Youth and Adults)
• Urban and Consumer Agriculture
• Community Development
• Healthy Eating, Physical Activity and Chronic Disease Risk Reduction
• Volunteer Readiness
• Local Food Systems

Cooperative Extension staff in Burke County will design, implement and evaluate educational programming in the identified areas to bring about positive change for the citizens of Burke County.

III. Objectives to Address the Cooperative Extension Long Range Plan

North Carolina's plant production systems will become more profitable and sustainable.

Value* Outcome Description
73Number of crop (all plant systems) producers increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, and/or skills as related to: 1. Best management production practices (cultural, nutrient, and genetics) 2. Pest/insect, disease, weed, wildlife management 3. Financial/Farm management tools and practices (business, marketing, government policy, human resources) 4. Alternative agriculture, bioenergy, and value-added enterprises
2Number of Extension initiated and controlled County demonstration test sites (new required for GLF/PSI reporting)
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
62Number of crop (all plant systems) producers adopting best management practices, including those practices related to nutrient management, conservation, production, cultivars, pest management (weeds, diseases, insects), business management, and marketing
17150Net income gains realized by the adoption of best management practices, including those practices related to nutrient management, conservation, production, cultivars, pest management (weeds, diseases, insects), business management, and marketing
40Number of producers reporting increased dollar returns per acre or reduced costs per acre
80Number of producers reporting reduction in fertilizer used per acre
3317Number of acres in conservation tillage or other Best Management Practice
1662Tons of feedstock delivered to processor
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

North Carolina's animal production systems will become more profitable and sustainable.

Value* Outcome Description
796Number of animal producers increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, and/or skills as related to: 1. Best management production practices (cultural, nutrient, and genetics) 2. Pest/insect, disease, weed, wildlife management 3. Financial/Farm management tools and practices (business, marketing, government policy, human resources) 4. Alternative agriculture, bioenergy, and value-added enterprises
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
166Number of animal producers adopting Extension-recommended best management practices, including those practices related to husbandry, improved planning, marketing, and financial practices
60273Net income gains by producers adopting Extension-recommended best management practices, including those practices related to husbandry, improved planning, marketing, and financial practices
43Number of animal producers implementing Extension-recommended best management practices for animal waste management
4904Tons of livestock organic by-products utilized (nutrients from waste, compost, etc)
254042Net income gain by using livestock organic by-products instead of synthetic fertilizers
2079Number of acres where Extension-recommended waste analysis was used for proper land application
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Producers will increase sales of food locally to more agriculturally aware consumers through market development, producer and consumer education, and new farmer and infrastructure support.

Value* Outcome Description
191Number of producers who gain skills or knowledge to increase production for local markets.
195Number of adults (including producers, food business owners, etc.) who improved knowledge of local food and agricultural systems.
1002Number of children/youth who improved knowledge of local food and agricultural systems.
378Number of individuals who gain knowledge or acquire skills related to vegetable/fruit gardening, and if also reporting under Urban and Consumer Agriculture Objective, divide up the reported number appropriately between the two objectives to avoid duplication.
18Number of producers who improve local food marketing skills or knowledge.
105Number of individuals who learn how to prepare local foods, including through use of home food preservation techniques.
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
1Number of new and existing access points for consumers that expand or improve their offering of local fruits and vegetables. Access points include farmers markets, retail stores, school food programs, community gardens, institutions other than schools (e.g. hospitals, universities, etc.), and other systems/access points not noted (e.g. restaurants, etc.).
68Number of producers selling their agricultural products to local markets (direct, intermediated/food service, institutional) for consumption in NC.
43Number of producers (and other members of the local food supply chain) who have increased revenue.
3Number of new farms (beginning farmers) selling into local markets for local consumption (in this reporting period).
151Number of individuals who grow food in community gardens.
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Agricultural producers, workers, food handlers and consumers will adopt safer food and agricultural production, handling, and distribution practices that reduce workplace and home injuries/illnesses, enhance food security, and increase the quality and safety of food that North Carolinians prepare and consume.

Value* Outcome Description
12Number of food service employees receiving ServSafe certification
66Number of participants trained in safe home food handling, preservation, or preparation practices
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
12Number of participants implementing ServSafe
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Youth and adults will address community issues and/or challenges through volunteerism.

Value* Outcome Description
22Number of adult participants acquiring the skills needed to serve as a volunteer
10Number of youth participants reporting aspirations to serve in new or expanded volunteer roles in community
2Number of adult participants reporting aspirations to serve in new or expanded volunteer roles in community
6Number of hours adult volunteer training conducted
20Number of hours youth volunteer training conducted
2Number new volunteers recruited
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
10Increased number of hours contributed by trained youth volunteers
6Increased number of hours contributed by trained adult volunteers
2Number of youth volunteers serving in new or expanded roles within Extension
2Number of adult volunteers serving in new or expanded roles within Extension
2Number of youth volunteers serving in new or expanded roles beyond Extension, including community boards and task forces
2Number of adult volunteers serving in new or expanded roles beyond Extension, including community boards and task forces
5Number of youth volunteers recruiting and/or training new volunteers
2Number of adult volunteers recruiting and/or training new volunteers
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Community members, organizations and local government will engage in collaborative dialog and decision-making to build economically, socially and environmentally resilient communities. This will be done through inclusive engagement, partnership building, and/or community planning.

Value* Outcome Description
51Number of participants increasing knowledge and skills in convening and leading inclusive, representative groups (including limited resources, new resident, or immigrant groups) for evidence based community development
42Number of participants developing skills in leading community, economic, and/or disaster planning and change
3Number of communities that have included agricultural and food system considerations into disaster preparedness plans or procedures due to Extension’s involvement
178Number of residents that increase their knowledge in disaster preparedness planning, mitigation and recovery
182Number of participants who increased their awareness, knowledge or skill in business related topics (e.g., management, product development, marketing, business structure options, business law and/or liability)
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
10Number of businesses created, retained, or expanded due to Extension’s community and economic development programming
3Number of local food councils in which Extension is involved
98Number of participants who adopted disaster preparedness and mitigation practices
92Number of participants who report new or expanded leadership roles and opportunities undertaken
23000Dollar value of in-kind resources (funding, in-kind service or volunteers) contributed to Projects or Programs in which Extension was critically involved by an organization or community to support community or economic development work
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Futures that Work: School to Career Pathways

Value* Outcome Description
30Number of teachers trained in 4-H STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) curriculum
605Number of youth (students) increasing knowledge in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math)
308Total number of female participants in STEM program
5Number of youth (students) participating in 4-H dropout prevention (student at-risk) programs
15Number of high school age youth (students) participating as members of 4-H clubs
50Number of youth (students) increasing knowledge of career/employability skills
20Number of adults increasing knowledge of career/employability skills
50Number of youth (students) increasing knowledge of entrepreneurship
20Number of adults increasing knowledge of entrepreneurship
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
23Number of teachers using 4-H STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) curriculum in their classrooms
1450Number of youth (students) gaining knowledge in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math)
6Number of youth (students) gaining career / employability skills
2Number of adults gaining career / employability skills
8Number of youth (students) gaining entrepreneurship skills
2Number of adults gaining entrepreneurship skills
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Consumers and communities will enhance the value of plants, animals, and landscapes while conserving valuable natural resources and protecting the environment.

Value* Outcome Description
1119Number of participants improving knowledge, attitude, skills and aspirations regarding gardening and landscape practices including plant selection and placement, turfgrass management, soil management, growing food, water conservation and water quality preservation, storm water and erosion management, green waste management, pest and wildlife management
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
456Number of participants who use extension-recommended best management practices in landscapes, turf, and gardens, including pest (insect, weed, disease) management, fertility management, water conservation, water quality preservation and pruning techniques
58900Total cost savings from the use of extension-recommended best management practices in landscapes, turf, and gardens, including pest (insect, weed, disease) management, fertility management, water conservation, water quality preservation and pruning techniques
217Number of participants who use extension-recommended pest management practices in homes, public facilities, businesses or in community pest management programs
161000Cost savings from using extension-recommended pest management practices in homes, public facilities, businesses or in community pest management programs
154Number of participants selecting appropriate landscape plants (adapted, drought tolerant, appropriate size, etc.)
31000Cost savings from the appropriate selection of landscape plants
449Number of participants growing food for home consumption
480000Value of produce grown for home consumption
44Number of participants adopting composting
6Reduced tonnage of greenwaste as a result of Extension-recommended practices including composting and proper plant selection
135Number of participants implementing extension-recommended practices to conserve water use and protect water qualty
6000Costs savings from implementing extension-recommended practices to conserve water use and protect water qualtiy
121Number of participants implementing extension-recommended practices to conserve water use and protect water qualtiy
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Youth and adult program participants will make healthy food choices, achieve the recommended amount of physical activity and reduce risk factors for chronic diseases.

Value* Impact Description
88Number of adults increasing their fruit and vegetables consumption
824Number of youth increasing their fruit and vegetable consumption
39Number of participants increasing their physical activity
6Number of participants reducing their BMI
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

IV. Number of Contacts Made by Extension

Type of ContactNumber
Face-to-face* 51,192
Non face-to-face** 92,135
Total by Extension staff in 2018 143,327
* Face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make directly with individuals through one-on-one visits, meetings, and other activities where staff members work directly with individuals.
** Non face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make indirectly with individuals by telephone, email, newsletters, news articles, radio, television, and other means.

V. Designated Grants Received by Extension

Type of GrantAmount
Contracts/Grants $200.00
Gifts/Donations $24,310.00
In-Kind Grants/Donations $4,661.18
United Way/Foundations $1,960.00
User Fees $13,885.00
Total $45,016.18

VI. Volunteer Involvement in Extension Programs

Number of Volunteers* Number of Volunteer Hours Known client contacts by volunteers Dollar Value at 25.43
4-H: 286 1,999 12,079 $ 50,835.00
Advisory Leadership System: 105 724 3,194 $ 18,411.00
Extension Community Association: 0 0 0 $ 0.00
Extension Master Gardener: 348 1,838 1,950 $ 46,740.00
Other: 207 815 2,679 $ 20,725.00
Total: 946 5376 19902 $ 136,712.00
* The number of volunteers reflects the overall number of volunteers for multiple events.

VII. Membership of Advisory Leadership System

Burke County Extension Advisory Council
Greg Craver
Todd Shuping
Susan Smith
Andrea Gladden
Richard Evey
David Berry
Krista Lail
Ben Crawley
Kenneth King
Jason Carswell
Chuck Schlein
Rebecca Shuping
Robert Lowman
Charles Wilson
Nick Thompson
Carlton Curoso
Denise Cannon
Lisa Hanlon
Phillip Houk
Burke County 4-H Advisory
Gail Lail
Lou Ella Daniels
Greg Craver
Nick Thompson
Andrea Gladden
Rebecca Shuping
Lisa Hanlon
FCS Program Committee
Savannah Wilson
Lisa Moore
Chae Moore
Charlotte Eidson
Crystal Martin
Lisa Dean
Rebekah Poplin
Mackinzie McClure
Wendi Warren
Karen Robinson
Hollie Phillips
Renee Mull
Horticulture Program Committee
Denise Cannon
Krista Lail
Johnny Yancey
Charles Wilson
Kenneth King
Livestock, Field Crops & Forestry Program Advisory Committee
Robert Lowman
Billy Parton
Doug Pitts
Randall Brackett
Jason Carswell
Trossie Wall
Phillip Houk
Rebecca Shuping

VIII. Staff Membership

Spring Williams-Byrd
Title: County Extension Director
Phone: (828) 764-9480
Email: spring_williams@ncsu.edu

Brent Buchanan
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Dairy
Phone: (315) 212-1277
Email: babuchan@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Dairy Extension Programming in Western North Carolina Counties of Haywood, Madison, Buncombe, Transylvania, Henderson, Yancey, McDowell, Polk, Rutherford, Mitchell, Avery, Burke, Cleveland, Watauga, Caldwell, Catawba, Lincoln, Gaston, Ashe, Wilkes, Alexander, Iredell, Alleghany, Surry, Yadkin, and Davie.

Glenda Burgess
Title: County Extension Administrative Assistant
Phone: (828) 764-9480
Email: glenda_burgess@ncsu.edu

Nicki Carpenter
Title: Extension Agent, 4-H Youth Development
Phone: (828) 764-9480
Email: nicki_carpenter@ncsu.edu

April Dillon
Title: Area Extension Agent, 4-H Youth Development
Phone: (704) 482-4365
Email: april_dillon@ncsu.edu

Lauren Greene
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Poultry
Phone: (336) 651-7347
Email: lauren_greene@ncsu.edu

Marissa Herchler
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Animal Food Safety (FSMA Programs)
Phone: (919) 515-5396
Email: marissa_herchler@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Marissa is an Area Specialized Agent for animal food safety, with emphasis on the new Food Safety Modernization Act rules, as they apply to feed mills in North Carolina. Please contact Marissa with any FSMA related questions, or PCQI training inquiries.

Virginia Lopez
Title: Nutrition Educator, SNAP-Ed
Phone: (828) 764-9480
Email: virginia_lopez@ncsu.edu

Bill Lord
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Water Resources
Phone: (919) 496-3344
Email: william_lord@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Water quality education and technical assistance

Craig Mauney
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Commercial Vegetables and Fruits
Phone: (828) 684-3562
Email: craig_mauney@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provides educational opportunities, training and technical support to commercial fruit and vegetable growers, agents, and industry in Western NC.

Currey Nobles
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Food Safety
Phone: (919) 515-9520
Email: canobles@ncsu.edu

Damon Pollard
Title: Extension Agent, Agriculture - Livestock, Field Crops and Forestry
Phone: (828) 439-4460
Email: damon_pollard@ncsu.edu

Elena Rogers
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Food Safety - Fresh Produce Western NC
Phone: (828) 352-2519
Email: elena_rogers@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provide educational programs, training and technical support focusing on fresh produce safety to Agents and growers in Western NC.

Dawn Snyder
Title: County Extension Support Specialist
Phone: (828) 764-9480
Email: dawn_snyder@ncsu.edu

Debbie Stroud
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Consumer and Retail Food Safety
Phone: (919) 515-9149
Email: dlstroud@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Area Specialized Agents in Consumer and Retail Food Safety help to ensure that Family and Consumer Sciences (FCS) Agents have access to timely, evidence-based food safety information. This is accomplished by (1) working with FCS Agents in their counties, (2) developing food safety materials and (3) planning and implementing a NC Safe Plates Food Safety Info Center.

Amanda Taylor
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Nursery and Greenhouse, Western Region
Phone: (828) 475-2915
Email: amanda_jo_taylor@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provides programming to commercial nursery and greenhouse producers in Alexander, Alleghany, Ashe, Avery, Buncombe, Burke, Caldwell, Catawba, Cherokee, Clay, Cleveland, Gaston, Graham, Haywood, Henderson, Jackson, Lincoln, Macon, Madison, McDowell, Mitchell, Polk, Rutherford, Swain, Transylvania, Watauga, Wilkes, and Yancey Counties.

Donna Teasley
Title: Extension Agent, Agriculture - Horticulture
Phone: (828) 439-4460
Email: Donna_Teasley@ncsu.edu

Emily Troutman
Title: Extension Agent, Family and Consumer Sciences
Phone: (828) 764-9480
Email: emily_troutman@ncsu.edu

Mitch Woodward
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Watersheds and Water Quality
Phone: (919) 250-1112
Email: mdwoodwa@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: NC Cooperative Extension's Goals include: - NC's natural resources and environmental quality will be protected, conserved and enhanced. - NC will have profitable, environmentally sustainable plant, animal and food systems. Protecting our environmental resources, particularly drinking water quality, is a top priority in NC. NC Cooperative Extension is a leader in teaching, researching, and accelerating the adoption of effective water quality protection practices.

IX. Contact Information

Burke County Center
130 Ammons Dr
Morganton, NC 28655

Phone: (828) 764-9480
Fax: (828) 764-9481
URL: http://burke.ces.ncsu.edu