2018 Camden County Plan of Work

Approved: January 22, 2018

I. County Background

Camden County, according to the 2010 census, has a population of 9,980, making it a relatively small, rural county. Agriculture is still a strong industry in Camden, with cash receipts totaling over $59 million for 2012. The majority of employment within the county comes from public jobs and small businesses. Many citizens are employed in neighboring counties and southeastern Virginia. The poverty rate is relatively low at 9.3% compared to the rest of the state and the average household income is $48,365. The population consists of 82% White, 13.2% Black, 1.2% Hispanic, 1.2% Asian and .3% American Indian & Alaska Native.

Improving the sustainability and profitability of agriculture systems in the county remains a leading priority for the county. Based on needs identified by a focus group representative of the Camden County population, priorities for 2018 will include:

-Youth Leadership and Educational Programs
-Health and Wellness (Nutrition/Physical Activity)
-Youth Entrepreneurship/Business/Social Skills
-Agricultural Awareness and Education
-Local Foods and Food Preservation and Use
-Emerging Issues for Farmers (Pests, Best Practices)
-Agriculture Producer Education

Camden County Cooperative Extension continually develops and implements new programs to address all of these major needs. The Camden Extension Staff is committed to and responsible for the delivery of research based educational programs to residents of the county.

II. Objectives to Address the Cooperative Extension Long Range Plan

North Carolina's plant production systems will become more profitable and sustainable.

North Carolina's animal production systems will become more profitable and sustainable.

Producers will increase sales of food locally to more agriculturally aware consumers through market development, producer and consumer education, and new farmer and infrastructure support.

Agricultural producers, workers, food handlers and consumers will adopt safer food and agricultural production, handling, and distribution practices that reduce workplace and home injuries/illnesses, enhance food security, and increase the quality and safety of food that North Carolinians prepare and consume.

Individuals and groups will acquire leadership and decision making capacities needed to guide and actively participate in local and state organizations.

Youth and adults will address community issues and/or challenges through volunteerism.

Community members, organizations and local government will engage in collaborative dialog and decision-making to build economically, socially and environmentally resilient communities. This will be done through inclusive engagement, partnership building, and/or community planning.

Futures that Work: School to Career Pathways

Consumers and communities will enhance the value of plants, animals, and landscapes while conserving valuable natural resources and protecting the environment.

Youth and adult program participants will make healthy food choices, achieve the recommended amount of physical activity and reduce risk factors for chronic diseases.

III. Relationship to County Government Objectives

Camden County Extension staff work with the local government to align our goals with the goals the county has identified in their strategic plan. Maintaining a good working partnership and relationship with the county and its officials remains a top priority of Cooperative Extension to aid in providing the necessary resources and needs based educational programming to the citizens.

Staff are also prepared to serve in the most needed capacity to the county during disaster and recovery events. The extension service stands ready to serve its role in educational programming, as well as be a source for information and recovery in the event that there is a disaster.

Cooperative Extension provides staff development for county departments and facilitates crucial conversations.

IV. Diversity Plan

All reasonable efforts are being implemented to provide services to diverse audiences. Public awareness of programs remains a priority for marketing Extension programs to under served groups. Annually, programs are audited to target groups that have little or no participation in programs to ensure inclusiveness. Civil rights plans of actions are updated annually. Staff is committed to positive action to secure equal opportunity and all programs are offered without exception to individuals regardless of race, color, creed, national origin, religion, sex, age, or disability. Staff members have received training to be aware of diverse ethnic and cultural characteristics and are equipped to design programs that meet culturally congruent learning styles. With notification, staff can accommodate individuals with disabilities for most programs.

V. Primary Delivery and Evaluation Methods

Delivering timely, relevant educational programs that meet critical local needs is the cornerstone of Extension’s mission. Extension educational programs are designed to equip the citizens of Camden County with the knowledge, skills and tools to improve their economic prosperity, environmental stewardship and quality of life. An Extension program delivery system is a planned and organized eclectic mix of educational methods used during an educational program. Extension educational methods are the specific ways by which research-based information is shared with targeted learners. Extension educators in our county employ a wide variety of hands-on, experiential educational methods, such as interactive workshops and classes, demonstrations, field days and tours, that allow learners to fully engage in the learning process, test new knowledge and/or practice new skills during the educational session. Equally important, this plan will also include educational methods such as seminars, client visits, fact sheets, newsletters, and home study kits that serve to support and reinforce learning as well as provide motivation for continued learning. Armed with the most current literature on effective teaching and learning, Extension educators also skillfully select educational methods based on the learning style preferences and special needs of the targeted learners. These client-focused methods afford learners the opportunity to gain the necessary knowledge and skills to change their lives in meaningful ways. Another key feature of Extension program delivery that is evident in this plan is our commitment to being customer driven and customer focused. As such, Extension educational programs are delivered online, in community centers, on farms, and other locations in order for our programs to be available and accessible to, and fully utilized by, the citizens of Camden County.

In Extension, success is defined as the extent to which our educational programs have made a difference in the lives of the citizens of Camden County. Evaluation methods are the way we make those observations about first and foremost whether any changes occurred as a result our educational programs, and subsequently the significance of those changes. As an educational organization, the changes we seek focus on key outcomes such as the knowledge and skills participants gain from our programs. More specifically, in this plan, we are using quantitative research methods such as retrospective testing, pre and post tests and/or surveys to measure change in knowledge gained, the application of that knowledge, number of new skills developed, and types of new skills developed. Extension, as a results-oriented organization, is committed to also assessing the social, economic and/or environmental impact that our programs have on the individuals who participate, their families and communities and ultimately the county as a whole (i.e. true significance of the changes stemming from our programs). We plan to measure these impacts in both the long and short-term. In this annual plan (short-term), we have outlined financial impact and cost benefit analysis as our primary evaluation methods. Another value held in Extension is actively listening to and dialoguing with targeted learners. Therefore, this plan also includes qualitative evaluation methods such as testimonials from program participants, and interviews and focus groups with participants.

VI. Membership of Advisory Leadership System

Camden 4-H Foundation
Mike Aydlett
Alvin Shaw
Laurie Krainiak
Dottie Milstead
Don Keaton
Bryant Jennings
Brian Lannon
David Owens
Wayne White
Christian Overton
Samuel Shaw, III
Extension Advisory Council
Mike Aydlett
Alvin Shaw
Laurie Krainiak
Dottie Milstead
Don Keaton
Bryant Jennings
Brian Lannon
David Owens
Wayne White
Christian Overton
Samuel Shaw, III

VII. Staff Membership

Cameron Lowe
Title: County Extension Director, Currituck & Camden
Phone: (252) 232-2261
Email: cameron_lowe@ncsu.edu

Austin Brown
Title: Extension Agent, Agriculture
Phone: (252) 331-7630
Email: austin_brown@ncsu.edu

Susan Chase
Title: Regional Nutrition Extension Associate - Northeast EFNEP and SNAP-Ed
Phone: (252) 902-1700
Email: susan_chase@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Job Description: Provides programmatic supervision to the EFNEP program in the Northeast District

Candice Christian
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Consumer & Retail Food Safety
Phone: (919) 515-9148
Email: Candice_Christian@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: The overall goal of the Area Specialized Agents (ASAs) in Consumer & Retail Food Safety is to support FCS Agents in delivering timely and evidence-based food safety education and information to stakeholders in North Carolina.

Erin Eure
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Commercial Fruits & Vegetables
Phone: (252) 357-1400
Email: erin_eure@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provides educational opportunities and technical support to commercial fruit and vegetable growers, agents, and industry in northeastern NC.

Steve Gabel
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Aquaculture
Phone: (252) 482-6585
Email: steve_gabel@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Responsible for aquaculture educational programs for the NC NE extension district.

Marissa Herchler
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Animal Food Safety (FSMA Programs)
Phone: (919) 515-5396
Email: marissa_herchler@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Marissa is an Area Specialized Agent for animal food safety, with emphasis on the new Food Safety Modernization Act rules, as they apply to feed mills in North Carolina. Please contact Marissa with any FSMA related questions, or PCQI training inquiries.

Ali Huber
Title: Extension Agent, 4-H Youth Development
Phone: (252) 331-7630
Email: Ali_Huber@ncsu.edu

Lynette Johnston
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Food Safety
Phone: (919) 515-0303
Email: lynette_johnston@ncsu.edu

Olivia Jones
Title: Area Agent, Family and Consumer Sciences
Phone: (252) 232-2261
Email: olivia_jones@ncsu.edu

Danny Lauderdale
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Nursery and Greenhouse, Eastern Region
Phone: (252) 237-0111
Email: danny_lauderdale@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provides programming to commercial ornamental nursery and greenhouse producers in eastern North Carolina.

Bill Lord
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Water Resources
Phone: (919) 496-3344
Email: william_lord@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Water quality education and technical assistance

Margaret Ross
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Poultry
Phone: (252) 670-8254
Email: margaret_ross@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Working with commercial poultry producers to assist in writing nutrient management plans and conducting educational programming.

Chip Simmons
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Food Safety
Phone: (919) 414-5632
Email: odsimmon@ncsu.edu

Scott Tilley
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Field Crops
Phone: (252) 793-4428
Email: scott_tilley@ncsu.edu

Amy Twiddy
Title: County Extension Administrative Assistant
Phone: (252) 331-7630
Email: amy_twiddy@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provide clerical support to County Extension Director, Extension Agents and Program Assistants.

Mitch Woodward
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Watersheds and Water Quality
Phone: (919) 250-1112
Email: mdwoodwa@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: NC Cooperative Extension's Goals include: - NC's natural resources and environmental quality will be protected, conserved and enhanced. - NC will have profitable, environmentally sustainable plant, animal and food systems. Protecting our environmental resources, particularly drinking water quality, is a top priority in NC. NC Cooperative Extension is a leader in teaching, researching, and accelerating the adoption of effective water quality protection practices.

VIII. Contact Information

Camden County Center
120 NC Highway 343 N
Camden, NC 27921

Phone: (252) 331-7630
Fax: (252) 338-0277
URL: http://camden.ces.ncsu.edu