2018 Camden County Program Impact Report

Approved: January 23, 2019

I. Executive Summary

In 2018, Camden County agents and program staff delivered educational programs and provided face-to-face education and assistance to over 4341 citizens. Camden Extension volunteers donated 1295 hours of service and expanded the reach of programming by over 447 contacts. The total estimated value of volunteer contributions was $31,974. Fundraising, grants and community contributions for program enhancement in 2018 totalled $86,720.

Agricultural initiatives in 2018 included: winter corn and soybean production meetings, the Northeast Ag Expo Small Grain Field Day, corn and soybean on-farm variety trials, the 2018 Northeast Ag Expo Field Day, and wheat variety trials. The Small Grain Field Day was held in Camden County in 2018. As a result of this one event, 47 farmers received pesticide license credits; 33 commercial pesticide applicators received a total of 66 credits, which preserved a total of $204,600 in wages and saved them a $1,320 in registration fees. When asked if they had benefited from previous small grain field days, 27 participants had an average yield increase of 5.5 bushels per acre for a total value of $561,393. Overall, Camden farmers and agribusiness people realized over $1,899,200 in income gains and/or preserved wages by utilizing information shared through Cooperative Extension programs.

The availability of food and nutrition programming to Camden County residents continued to increase in 2018. Through cooking classes and local foods programming, over 100 individuals reported increasing their fruit and vegetable consumption. Food demonstrations and preservation programs at the county’s agregate nutrition site and with county employees resulted in 77 individuals who reported increased knowledge of food preservation techniques and using decreased sodium in foods.

A new 4-H Agent was hired to lead the Camden County 4-H program in 2018. Twenty-one new volunteers were recruited to extend the reach of 4-H programming. New initiatives in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) resulted in nearly 300 students improving their STEM skills with 145 of those students being female. Further, the Camden County 4-H Department assumed leadership of the county’s Juvenile Crime Prevention grant program. This grant, valued at over $60,000 will enhance Camden County 4-H’s ability to reach at risk youth with positive youth development experiences.

Camden Cooperative Extension continues to offer a solid, needs based program focused on improving the lives, land and economy of Camden citizens.

II. County Background

Camden County, according to the 2010 census, has a population of 9,980, making it a relatively small, rural county. Agriculture is still a strong industry in Camden, with cash receipts totaling over $59 million for 2012. The majority of employment within the county comes from public jobs and small businesses. Many citizens are employed in neighboring counties and southeastern Virginia. The poverty rate is relatively low at 9.3% compared to the rest of the state and the average household income is $48,365. The population consists of 82% White, 13.2% Black, 1.2% Hispanic, 1.2% Asian and .3% American Indian & Alaska Native.

Improving the sustainability and profitability of agriculture systems in the county remains a leading priority for the county. Based on needs identified by a focus group representative of the Camden County population, priorities for 2018 will include:

-Youth Leadership and Educational Programs
-Health and Wellness (Nutrition/Physical Activity)
-Youth Entrepreneurship/Business/Social Skills
-Agricultural Awareness and Education
-Local Foods and Food Preservation and Use
-Emerging Issues for Farmers (Pests, Best Practices)
-Agriculture Producer Education

Camden County Cooperative Extension continually develops and implements new programs to address all of these major needs. The Camden Extension Staff is committed to and responsible for the delivery of research based educational programs to residents of the county.

III. Objectives to Address the Cooperative Extension Long Range Plan

North Carolina's plant production systems will become more profitable and sustainable.

Value* Outcome Description
711Number of crop (all plant systems) producers increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, and/or skills as related to: 1. Best management production practices (cultural, nutrient, and genetics) 2. Pest/insect, disease, weed, wildlife management 3. Financial/Farm management tools and practices (business, marketing, government policy, human resources) 4. Alternative agriculture, bioenergy, and value-added enterprises
7Number of Extension initiated and controlled County demonstration test sites (new required for GLF/PSI reporting)
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
1899209Net income gains realized by the adoption of best management practices, including those practices related to nutrient management, conservation, production, cultivars, pest management (weeds, diseases, insects), business management, and marketing
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

North Carolina's animal production systems will become more profitable and sustainable.

Value* Outcome Description
3Number of animal producers increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, and/or skills as related to: 1. Best management production practices (cultural, nutrient, and genetics) 2. Pest/insect, disease, weed, wildlife management 3. Financial/Farm management tools and practices (business, marketing, government policy, human resources) 4. Alternative agriculture, bioenergy, and value-added enterprises
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
1Number of animal producers adopting Extension-recommended best management practices, including those practices related to husbandry, improved planning, marketing, and financial practices
2175Net income gains by producers adopting Extension-recommended best management practices, including those practices related to husbandry, improved planning, marketing, and financial practices
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Producers will increase sales of food locally to more agriculturally aware consumers through market development, producer and consumer education, and new farmer and infrastructure support.

Value* Outcome Description
29Number of adults (including producers, food business owners, etc.) who improved knowledge of local food and agricultural systems.
20Number of children/youth who improved knowledge of local food and agricultural systems.
52Number of individuals who learn how to prepare local foods, including through use of home food preservation techniques.
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Agricultural producers, workers, food handlers and consumers will adopt safer food and agricultural production, handling, and distribution practices that reduce workplace and home injuries/illnesses, enhance food security, and increase the quality and safety of food that North Carolinians prepare and consume.

Value* Outcome Description
786Number of pesticide application credit hours provided
12Number of participants participating in AgriSafe personal protective equipment (PPE) selection or fit testing
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Individuals and groups will acquire leadership and decision making capacities needed to guide and actively participate in local and state organizations.

Value* Outcome Description
29Number of adults increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
6Number of adults assuming new/expanded leadership roles in the community
35Number of youth increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
29Number of adults increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
6Number of adults assuming new/expanded leadership roles in the community
35Number of youth increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Youth and adults will address community issues and/or challenges through volunteerism.

Value* Outcome Description
8Number of adult participants acquiring the skills needed to serve as a volunteer
1Number of youth participants reporting aspirations to serve in new or expanded volunteer roles in community
8Number of adult participants reporting aspirations to serve in new or expanded volunteer roles in community
5Number of hours adult volunteer training conducted
21Number new volunteers recruited
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
10Increased number of hours contributed by trained youth volunteers
120Increased number of hours contributed by trained adult volunteers
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Community members, organizations and local government will engage in collaborative dialog and decision-making to build economically, socially and environmentally resilient communities. This will be done through inclusive engagement, partnership building, and/or community planning.

Value* Outcome Description
19Number of participants increasing knowledge and skills in convening and leading inclusive, representative groups (including limited resources, new resident, or immigrant groups) for evidence based community development
19Number of participants developing skills in leading community, economic, and/or disaster planning and change
19Number of participants who increased their awareness, knowledge or skill in business related topics (e.g., management, product development, marketing, business structure options, business law and/or liability)
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
41874Dollar value of in-kind resources (funding, in-kind service or volunteers) contributed to Projects or Programs in which Extension was critically involved by an organization or community to support community or economic development work
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Futures that Work: School to Career Pathways

Value* Outcome Description
352Number of youth (students) increasing knowledge in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math)
185Total number of female participants in STEM program
8Number of youth (students) participating in 4-H dropout prevention (student at-risk) programs
5Number of high school age youth (students) participating as members of 4-H clubs
56Number of youth (students) increasing knowledge of career/employability skills
51Number of youth (students) increasing knowledge of entrepreneurship
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
352Number of youth (students) gaining knowledge in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math)
56Number of youth (students) gaining career / employability skills
51Number of youth (students) gaining entrepreneurship skills
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Consumers and communities will enhance the value of plants, animals, and landscapes while conserving valuable natural resources and protecting the environment.

Value* Outcome Description
46Number of participants improving knowledge, attitude, skills and aspirations regarding gardening and landscape practices including plant selection and placement, turfgrass management, soil management, growing food, water conservation and water quality preservation, storm water and erosion management, green waste management, pest and wildlife management
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
43Number of participants who use extension-recommended best management practices in landscapes, turf, and gardens, including pest (insect, weed, disease) management, fertility management, water conservation, water quality preservation and pruning techniques
5200Total cost savings from the use of extension-recommended best management practices in landscapes, turf, and gardens, including pest (insect, weed, disease) management, fertility management, water conservation, water quality preservation and pruning techniques
38Number of participants selecting appropriate landscape plants (adapted, drought tolerant, appropriate size, etc.)
5450Cost savings from the appropriate selection of landscape plants
39Number of participants implementing extension-recommended practices to conserve water use and protect water qualty
4400Costs savings from implementing extension-recommended practices to conserve water use and protect water qualtiy
39Number of participants implementing extension-recommended practices to conserve water use and protect water qualtiy
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Youth and adult program participants will make healthy food choices, achieve the recommended amount of physical activity and reduce risk factors for chronic diseases.

Value* Impact Description
87Number of adults increasing their fruit and vegetables consumption
23Number of youth increasing their fruit and vegetable consumption
38Number of participants increasing their physical activity
25Number of participants who consume less sodium in their diet
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

IV. Number of Contacts Made by Extension

Type of ContactNumber
Face-to-face* 4,303
Non face-to-face** 6,934
Total by Extension staff in 2018 11,237
* Face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make directly with individuals through one-on-one visits, meetings, and other activities where staff members work directly with individuals.
** Non face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make indirectly with individuals by telephone, email, newsletters, news articles, radio, television, and other means.

V. Designated Grants Received by Extension

Type of GrantAmount
Contracts/Grants $72,949.00
Gifts/Donations $5,726.00
In-Kind Grants/Donations $6,584.00
United Way/Foundations $0.00
User Fees $1,461.00
Total $86,720.00

VI. Volunteer Involvement in Extension Programs

Number of Volunteers* Number of Volunteer Hours Known client contacts by volunteers Dollar Value at 25.43
4-H: 77 1,099 406 $ 27,948.00
Advisory Leadership System: 14 28 27 $ 712.00
Extension Community Association: 0 0 0 $ 0.00
Extension Master Gardener: 0 0 0 $ 0.00
Other: 20 168 14 $ 4,272.00
Total: 111 1295 447 $ 32,932.00
* The number of volunteers reflects the overall number of volunteers for multiple events.

VII. Membership of Advisory Leadership System

Camden 4-H Foundation
Mike Aydlett
Alvin Shaw
Laurie Krainiak
Dottie Milstead
Don Keaton
Bryant Jennings
Brian Lannon
David Owens
Wayne White
Christian Overton
Samuel Shaw, III
Extension Advisory Council
Mike Aydlett
Alvin Shaw
Laurie Krainiak
Dottie Milstead
Don Keaton
Bryant Jennings
Brian Lannon
David Owens
Wayne White
Christian Overton
Samuel Shaw, III

VIII. Staff Membership

Cameron Lowe
Title: County Extension Director, Currituck and Camden
Phone: (252) 232-2261
Email: cameron_lowe@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Oversee personnel and operations of the Currituck and Camden County Centers of NC Cooperative Extension. Deliver educational programming in the area of Community and Rural Development. Facilitates group processes for a number of organizations. Training available in group process facilitation, MBTI preferences, leadership development and management.

Marcia Berry
Title: 4-H Program Assistant, 4-H Youth Development - JCPC Coordinator
Phone: (252) 331-7630
Email: marcia_berry@ncsu.edu

Austin Brown
Title: Extension Agent, Agriculture
Phone: (252) 331-7630
Email: austin_brown@ncsu.edu

Susan Chase
Title: Regional Nutrition Extension Associate - Northeast EFNEP and SNAP-Ed
Phone: (919) 827-2285
Email: susan_chase@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Job Description: Provides programmatic supervision to the EFNEP program in the Northeast District

Candice Christian
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Consumer and Retail Food Safety
Phone: (919) 515-9148
Email: Candice_Christian@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: The overall goal of the Area Specialized Agents (ASAs) in Consumer & Retail Food Safety is to support FCS Agents in delivering timely and evidence-based food safety education and information to stakeholders in North Carolina.

Erin Eure
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Commercial Fruits and Vegetables
Phone: (252) 357-1400
Email: erin_eure@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provides educational opportunities and technical support to commercial fruit and vegetable growers, agents, and industry in northeastern NC.

Steve Gabel
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Aquaculture
Phone: (252) 482-6585
Email: steve_gabel@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Responsible for aquaculture educational programs for the NC NE extension district.

Marissa Herchler
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Animal Food Safety (FSMA Programs)
Phone: (919) 515-5396
Email: marissa_herchler@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Marissa is an Area Specialized Agent for animal food safety, with emphasis on the new Food Safety Modernization Act rules, as they apply to feed mills in North Carolina. Please contact Marissa with any FSMA related questions, or PCQI training inquiries.

Ali Huber
Title: Extension Agent, 4-H Youth Development
Phone: (252) 331-7630
Email: Ali_Huber@ncsu.edu

Lynette Johnston
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Food Safety
Phone: (919) 515-0303
Email: lynette_johnston@ncsu.edu

Olivia Jones
Title: Area Agent, Family and Consumer Sciences
Phone: (252) 232-2261
Email: olivia_jones@ncsu.edu

Danny Lauderdale
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Nursery and Greenhouse, Eastern Region
Phone: (252) 237-0111
Email: danny_lauderdale@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provides programming to commercial ornamental nursery and greenhouse producers in eastern North Carolina.

Bill Lord
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Water Resources
Phone: (919) 496-3344
Email: william_lord@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Water quality education and technical assistance

Lori McBryde
Title: Area 4-H Agent, East Region
Phone: (919) 989-5380
Email: lori_mcbryde@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provide support the Eastern 34 Counties of the Northeast and Southeast Districts in 4-H Youth Development.

Margaret Ross
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Poultry
Phone: (252) 670-8254
Email: margaret_ross@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Working with commercial poultry producers to assist in writing nutrient management plans and conducting educational programming.

Chip Simmons
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Food Safety
Phone: (919) 414-5632
Email: odsimmon@ncsu.edu

Scott Tilley
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Field Crops
Phone: (252) 793-4428
Email: scott_tilley@ncsu.edu

Amy Twiddy
Title: County Extension Administrative Assistant
Phone: (252) 331-7630
Email: amy_twiddy@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provide clerical support to County Extension Director, Extension Agents and Program Assistants.

Mitch Woodward
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Watersheds and Water Quality
Phone: (919) 250-1112
Email: mdwoodwa@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: NC Cooperative Extension's Goals include: - NC's natural resources and environmental quality will be protected, conserved and enhanced. - NC will have profitable, environmentally sustainable plant, animal and food systems. Protecting our environmental resources, particularly drinking water quality, is a top priority in NC. NC Cooperative Extension is a leader in teaching, researching, and accelerating the adoption of effective water quality protection practices.

IX. Contact Information

Camden County Center
120 NC Highway 343 N
Camden, NC 27921

Phone: (252) 331-7630
Fax: (252) 338-0277
URL: http://camden.ces.ncsu.edu