2019 Chatham County Program Impact Report

Approved: January 21, 2020

I. Executive Summary

In 2019, under the guidance of 14 specialized, community-based advisory committees, Extension professionals housed in the Chatham County Center worked diligently to address the issues of positive youth development, health, wellness, nutrition, local foods, and agricultural profitability and sustainability.

This past year, the staff of the Chatham County Center made 1,339,971 face-to-face (workshops, field days, camps, etc.) and non-face-to-face (phone calls, emails, social media posts, educational booths, etc.) contacts. Likewise, Chatham County is blessed to have the invaluable help of skillful volunteers, and without their assistance, our outreach efforts would not have had the same impact. In 2019, the Chatham County Center utilized the services of over 1,500 volunteers who worked in excess of 10,000 hours; on behalf of the Cooperative Extension, those volunteers contributed to 15,367 known client contacts. This body of volunteer work was valued in excess of $258,000. In addition to volunteer contributions, Extension staff were able to secure over $103,000 in additional fiscal resources by way of grants, donations, sponsorships, and foundation funding. Below are some of the most notable programming highlights from the Chatham County Center:

• The Family and Consumer Sciences Program worked to improve the health, nutrition, and overall well-being of individuals in our community. SNAP-Ed (Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program – Education) classes were presented to 2nd grade students to increase their awareness of the need for healthy food choices and physical activity; seventy-five percent of parents reported observing their children eating more fruits/vegetables and drinking water more often as a result of programming. In partnership with the Chatham County Health Department, the Safe Plates for Food Managers program was conducted for service employees within Chatham County; as a result, 96% of participants successfully received certification, improving food handling practices county-wide. Additionally, Extension collaborated with the Chatham County Council on Aging to offer a much-needed educational programming to our senior community members regarding Powerful Tools for Caregivers, Chronic Disease Management, and Matter of Balance.
• Agriculture Extension Agents worked to improve both the profitability and sustainability of Chatham’s local agriculture sector, all while advocating for the conservation of our natural resources in conjunction to promoting environmentally friendly practices. In an effort to improve profitability in a volatile market, dairy farmers received training related to alternative markets, value added products, technology changes for conventional and organic milk production, cow health, and grazing systems. The Extension Gardener series formed the core of the horticulture program’s outreach efforts to home gardeners, encompassing a series of 15 hands-on workshops ranging from vegetable, fruit, and herb gardening, to sustainable lawn care, and incorporating native, wildlife-friendly perennials and woody plants into home landscapes. Four hundred-seventy Chatham County residents attended the combined workshops, introducing clients to the breadth and depth of sustainable, science-based gardening resources offered by NC Cooperative Extension. The 2019 Piedmont Green Industry and Landscape Conference included lectures on glyphosate alternatives, boxwood blight management, IPM for lawns, and proper tree planting and fertilization techniques. Over 100 landscape professionals attended the event, with three-quarters of attendees indicating they would adopt Extension-recommended IPM practices. Grant funding was received to develop evaluation instruments to document the need to reopen small scale poultry processing plants; as a result, it is hoped that this expressed need will act as a catalyst for rural, limited-resource farmers in Chatham in need of such services. A series of pesticide recertification courses were administered to local private and commercial producers, enabling them to maintain their licenses, learn practices to decrease the use of pesticides, and better understand how to safeguard themselves and the local environment. The Beef Cattle Economics workshop grew out of a new initiative of the livestock program, where clientele were educated about the value of cooperative markets and improving calf crops; this workshop has manifested into a newly-formed Chatham County Cattle Alliance which will be integral to our local producers to succeed in future markets. Chatham County spearheaded a Farm Animal Welfare and Handling Training for local law enforcement and animal control staff, with 80% of participants improving their knowledge of problems facing animal agriculture, and 79% indicated they were better equipped to handle farm animal welfare cases and/or safely move animals. Sixteen Enhancing Sustainability Workshops for 1,020 farmers, gardeners, and forest landowners were conducted in 2019 in the areas of industrial hemp production, produce safety for farmers, forestry, advanced beekeeping, and pollinator conservation. The hemp workshop attracted 300 participants from 44 counties and 5 states. Furthermore, over 200 women landowners from around the Piedmont attended ForestHer NC workshops, a new initiative created by conservation organizations in North Carolina to provide women who are forest landowners with tools and training to help them manage their lands and become more engaged in forest stewardship, enabling participants to improve forest stewardship practices that are critical to our county and region.
• Chatham County 4-H provided positive youth development programs to foster invaluable skillsets in youth needed to succeed both in and outside of the classroom. During 2019, over 2,300 Chatham County students participated in 4-H School Enrichment Programs, with youth demonstrating enhanced conceptual understanding related to NC Common Core and Essential Standards currently tested in the classroom. In an effort to address summer learning loss, funds totaling over $18,000 were secured in donations and grant opportunities designated for at-risk and underprivileged youth. As a result, over 200 Chatham County youth were able to participate in 4-H Summer Camp programming, demonstrating marked gains in critical life skills related to responsibility, conflict resolution, and problem solving; furthermore, technical knowledge increases were seen in youth participants in the fields of agriculture, emergency preparedness, nutrition, science, technology, and horticulture.

II. County Background

The 2010 Census denoted Chatham County's population is 63,505, an increase of 28.74% since 2000. Chatham County is 1 of 15 counties in North Carolina that has experienced a growth rate over 25% since 2000. The Raleigh/Durham Metropolitan Statistical Area of which Chatham County is included tied for the third fastest growing area in the nation at 41.8%. With Chatham County being situated between the triangle and triad metropolitan areas in North Carolina, there is a significant amount of developmental pressure on the agrarian lifestyle enjoyed by many within the county and an increased need to promote sound agricultural literacy amongst the county population.

Agriculture and agribusiness continue to be the largest industries in Chatham County. The 2012 Census of Agriculture reported that there are 1,139 farms in the county, resulting in a 4.4% increase in the number of farms from the 2007 Census of Agriculture. The county ranks 2nd in the state in beef cow production, 4th in all cattle production, 5th in hay production, 11th in the number of dairy cows, and 16th in broiler production. In addition, Chatham County is 19th in the state in livestock, dairy, and poultry income; it also ranks 29th in total farm income.

With over 59% of the land in timber, we will continue to help forest landowners to improve their best management practices, increase forest profitability, and improve forest health. Chatham County enjoys a national reputation for its abundance of small, diversified farms that yield produce, flowers, herbs, native plants, meat, poultry, dairy, and value-added products. This local food production depends on pollinators such as honey bees and native bees to produce high quality fruits and vegetables. Pollinator habitat demonstration projects and other educational programs will promote the importance of protecting the pollinators that local farmers rely on to pollinate their crops.

As more urban populations move into Chatham, there is a greater need to educate those individuals about the importance of agriculture and agribusiness; this warrants a substantial need to increase the overall agricultural literacy of our county's citizens. With the completion and adoption of the Chatham County Comprehensive Plan, we will work earnestly to introduce strategies developed through this study in our own Extension programming. Our county office will address and promote the two main goals identified in the plan: (1) preserve, protect, and enable agriculture and forestry and (2) preserve the rural character and lifestyle of Chatham County. Overall, as recommended in the plan, we will act to support agriculture through increased education, outreach, and training efforts.

III. Objectives to Address the Cooperative Extension Long Range Plan

Our family and consumer sciences programs improve the well-being of individuals, families, and communities.

Our plant production programs improve production, profitability, and sustainability of the agriculture sector.

Value* Outcome Description
900Number of producers who gain skills or knowledge to increase production for local markets.
500Number of producers who improve local food marketing skills or knowledge.
153Number of pesticide applicators receiving continuing education credits
11Number of pesticide credit hours provided
1290Number of crop (all plant systems) producers increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, and/or skills as related to: 1. Best management production practices (cultural, nutrient, and genetics) 2. Pest/insect, disease, weed, wildlife management 3. Financial/Farm management tools and practices (business, marketing, government policy, human resources) 4. Alternative agriculture, bioenergy, and value-added enterprises
1Number of Extension initiated and controlled county demonstration test sites
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
80Number of producers who diversified their marketing strategies into local markets (direct, intermediated/food service, institutional).
90Number of producers (and other members of the local food supply chain) who have increased revenue
20Number of new farms (beginning farmers) selling into local markets for local consumption (in this reporting period)
28Number of farmers, employees or family members adopting regular use of appropriate PPE following AgriSafe or Certified Safe Farm participation
28Number of participants that have adopted farm safety practices
40Number of producers reporting reduction in fertilizer used per acre
100Number of acres in conservation tillage or other Best Management Practice
857Number of crop (all plant systems) producers adopting best management practices, including those practices related to nutrient management, conservation, production, cultivars, pest management (weeds, diseases, insects), business management, and marketing
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Our animal production programs improve production, profitability, and sustainability of the agriculture sector.

Value* Outcome Description
28Number of producers who improve local food marketing skills or knowledge.
105Number of producers who gain skills or knowledge to increase production for local markets.
262Number of animal producers who increased knowledge of farm business management, business planning, financial management, marketing, or estate planning.
472Number of animal producers who learned how to develop a management plan (i.e. grazing plan, feeding plan, drought plan, business plan, disaster plan, etc.)
394Number of producers who increased knowledge of pasture/forage management practices (field improvement, herbicide management, grazing season extension, weed control, forage quality, haylage production, nitrate testing, etc.)
488Number of producers who increased knowledge of nutrition, ration balancing, mineral supplements, breeding, and reproduction
444Number of producers who increased knowledge of the strategies to promote animal health and welfare and reduce the potential for infectious diseases through proper use of vaccines, biosecurity, detection and identification of common diseases, appropriate use of animal medications, and mitigation of antimicrobial resistance transmission
198Number of producers who increased knowledge of animal waste management practices
120Number of animal waste management credits earned through Extension programs
8Number of Extension conducted on-site sludge surveys or equipment calibrations
71Number of producers who increased knowledge of how to prepare, mitigate, and recover from natural disasters impacting animal agriculture
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
64Number of producers who diversified their marketing strategies into local markets (direct, intermediated/food service, institutional).
2Number of new farms (beginning farmers) selling into local markets for local consumption (in this reporting period)
229Number of producers (and other members of the local food supply chain) who have increased revenue
105Number of producers adopting extension-recommended practices related to planning, marketing, and financial management
78Number of producers implementing Extension-recommended best management practices for animal waste management
925000Number of acres where Extension-recommended nutrient applications were used
91Number of producers who adopted Extension-recommended best management practices and production changes related to quality assurance (vaccinations, castration, culling techniques, etc.)
80Number of producers who adopted Extension-recommended best management practices and production changes related to genetic improvement (AI, heifer/bull selection)
262Number of producers who adopted Extension-recommended best management practices and production changes related to nutrition (mineral, feed rations)
110Number of producers who adopted Extension-recommended best management practices and production changes related to internal parasite management (fecals, deworming)
247Number of producers who adopted Extension-recommended best management practices related to pasture management
315Number of producers who adopted Extension-recommended best management practices and production changes related to nutrition, ration balancing, mineral supplement, breeding, and reproduction
218Number of producers using improved biosecurity practices
12Number of waste utilization/waste management plans developed or updated
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Our community development programs build strong and thriving communities.

Value* Outcome Description
16Number of adult participants acquiring the skills needed to serve as a volunteer
5Number of participants who increased their awareness, knowledge or skill in business related topics (e.g., management, product development, marketing, business structure options, business law and/or liability)
21Number of participants that increase their knowledge of disaster preparedness planning, mitigation and recovery
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
4057Dollar value of in-kind resources contributed by organizations or community
381745Value of grants received by organizations, communities, or Extension where Extension was instrumental in initiating, facilitating, or providing technical assistant in the development of the grants to support community or economic development work
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Our 4-H youth development programs grow the skills young people need to succeed in life and career.

Value* Outcome Description
127Number of teachers trained in 4-H STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) curriculum
2725Number of youth (students) increasing knowledge in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math)
1447Total number of female participants in STEM program
91Number of high school age youth (students) participating as members of 4-H clubs
5564Number of youth increasing knowledge of life skills
1713Number of children/youth who improved knowledge of local food and agricultural systems.
2817Number of youth increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
2674Number of youth demonstrating increased knowledge of natural resources and environmental issues
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
153Number of teachers using 4-H STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) curriculum in their classrooms
5571Number of youth (students) gaining career / employability skills
692Number of youth (students) gaining entrepreneurship skills
3483Number of youth using effective life skills
2712Number of youth willing to participate in conservation actions
3797Number of youth increasing their physical activity
148Number of youth volunteers serving in new or expanded roles within Extension
43Number of youth volunteers serving in new or expanded roles beyond Extension, including community boards and task forces
650Number of youth assuming new/expanded leadership roles in the community
4571Number of youth increasing their fruit and vegetable consumption
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Our natural resource and environmental programs conserve our precious natural resources and maintain a clean and healthy environment.

Value* Outcome Description
150Number of participants willing to participate in conservation actions (such as rain gardens, wildlife management, conservation easements, land trusts, generational planning, etc.)
220Number of participants increasing their knowledge about best management practices (including storm water systems, septic system maintenance, erosion control, rain gardens, forestry, etc.)
496Number of adults demonstrating increased knowledge of natural resources and environmental issues
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
30Number of participants implementing extension-recommended practices to conserve water use and protect water quality
80Number of participants that adopted recommended agroecosystem adaption strategies for production agriculture or natural resource management, including for invasive species, pest management, pollutant loads, and wetlands.
100Number of acres under recommended agroecosystem adaption strategies for production agriculture or natural resource management, including for invasive species, pest management, pollutant loads, and wetlands.
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Our consumer horticulture programs teach families and communities about environmentally friendly methods for gardening and controlling pests.

Value* Outcome Description
243Number of individuals who gain knowledge or acquire skills related to vegetable/fruit gardening
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
207Number of individuals who begin home food production by starting a vegetable and/or fruit garden
291Number of participants who use extension-recommended best management practices in landscapes, turf, and gardens, including pest (insect, weed, disease, wildlife) and soil management
230Number of participants selecting appropriate landscape plants (adapted, drought tolerant, appropriate size, etc.)
219Number of participants growing food for home consumption
28Number of participants adopting composting
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Our food safety and nutrition programs create a safer and more sustainable food supply and improve the health and nutrition of individuals, families, and our communities.

Value* Outcome Description
19Number of participants who increase their knowledge of safe home food handling, preservation, or preparation practices
45Number of food handlers who increase their knowledge and skills in safe food handling practices
10Number of individuals who learn how to prepare local foods, including through use of home food preservation techniques.
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
115Number of participants developing food safety plans
128Number of adults increasing their fruit and vegetables consumption
96Number of participants increasing their physical activity
128Number of participants who consume less sodium in their diet
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

IV. Number of Contacts Made by Extension

Type of ContactNumber
Face-to-face* 18,563
Non face-to-face** 1,134,208
Total by Extension staff in 2019 1,152,771
* Face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make directly with individuals through one-on-one visits, meetings, and other activities where staff members work directly with individuals.
** Non face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make indirectly with individuals by telephone, email, newsletters, news articles, radio, television, and other means.

V. Designated Grants Received by Extension

Type of GrantAmount
Contracts/Grants $11,400.00
Gifts/Donations $11,027.18
In-Kind Grants/Donations $0.00
United Way/Foundations $19,998.00
User Fees $61,378.72
Total $103,803.90

VI. Volunteer Involvement in Extension Programs

Number of Volunteers* Number of Volunteer Hours Known client contacts by volunteers Dollar Value at 25.43
4-H 742 6440 10997 $ 163,769.00
Advisory Leadership System 180 265 443 $ 6,739.00
Extension Master Gardener 314 2447 1098 $ 62,227.00
Other: Administrative 45 45 130 $ 1,144.00
Other: Agriculture 129 371 82 $ 9,435.00
Other: Community, Family & Individual Development 104 565 2557 $ 14,368.00
Other: Food & Nutrition 1 30 60 $ 763.00
Total: 1515 10163 15367 $ 258,445.00
* The number of volunteers reflects the overall number of volunteers for multiple events.

VII. Membership of Advisory Leadership System

Chatham County Advisory Leadership Council
Bob Atwater
Chris Bouton
Ron Dameron
Cindy Dameron
Edsel Daniel
Tommy Glosson
Mary Dickerson
Clarence Durham
Dr. Barbara Walton
Brenda Williams
Larilee Isley
Charles Lutterloh
Sharon Day
Cindy Poindexter
Maria Correa
Cecil Wilson
John Wait
Chatham County 4-H and Youth Advisory Committee
Julia Austin
Mary Dickerson
Elizabeth Fridley
Rob Bergmueller
Katelyn Batchelor
Raegan Brinkman
Kali Williard
Victoria Smith
Loretta Batchelor
Sandra McLaurin
Chatham County Family & Consumer Education Advisory Committee
Tammy Matthews
Susan Hardy
Edna Williams
Chatham County Livestock Advisory Committee
Kathy White
Phillip Watson
Thomas K. (Chip) Price, III
Brent Norwood
Loretta Batchelor
Todd White
Sam Groce
Wyatt Culberson
Eugene Beavers
Lynn Crissman
Chatham County Dairy Advisory Committee
Neill Lindley
Leigh Lane
Chris Bowman
Keith Hockett
George Teague
Patrick Purcell
Eddie Patrick
Patrick Purcell
Neil Moye
Chatham County Horse Advisory Committee
Margaret Moore
Gary Moon
Charlie Bolton
Jim Thomas
Marty Allen
Janet Allen
Larilee Isley
Shannon Clark
Area Commercial Poultry Advisory Committee
Phil Bare
Todd Brooks
Jeff Beavers
Keith McDonald
Richard Williams
Brad Gee
Allan’s Foods Representative
Chatham County Horticulture Advisory Committee
Rob Bergmueller
Laurie Cousart
Melinda Fitzgerald
Maggie Frantz
David Higginbotham
Rene Higginbotham
Audrey Joy
Betsy Kraus
Keith Larkin
Paige Moody
Daniel Sundberg
Chatham County Sustainable Agriculture Advisory Committee
Cathy Jones
Robin Kohanowich
Judy Lessler
Fleming Pfann
Ben Shields
Tenita Solanto
Bobby Tucker
Beekeeping Advisory Committee
Maggie Frantz
Mimi Gussow
David Jones
Julia Kopacz
Jody Moore
Phil Uptmor
Pat Weisbrodt
Grayum Wells
Ray Wise
Kirby Zeman
Dairy Youth Advisory Committee
Janice Lindley
Jean Thomas
Mike Strickland
Samantha Gasson
Wayne Lutz
Margie Grubb
Connie Kivett
Chatham County Agriculture Advisory Board
Tandy Jones
Esta Cohen
Sharon Day
Dr. John Dykers
Terrill Ellington
Cathy Jones
Bobby Tucker
Tenita Solanto

VIII. Staff Membership

Ginger Cunningham
Title: County Extension Director and Extension Agent, 4-H Youth Development & Forestry
Phone: (919) 542-8249
Email: ginger_cunningham@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provides administrative leadership to Chatham County Center personnel and oversight of county-based programming. Assists youth with educational and enrichment opportunities related to 4-H club, camping, and school enrichment (4-H STEM) programming, in addition to delivering educational programming within the field of forestry.

Jonas Asbill
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Livestock - Poultry
Phone: (336) 318-6000
Email: jonas_asbill@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Serving the poultry industry across 20 counties in the North Central and Northeast districts

Victoria Brewer
Title: Extension Agent, 4-H Youth Development
Phone: (919) 545-8303
Email: victoria_brewer@ncsu.edu

Marti Day
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Dairy
Phone: (919) 542-8202
Email: marti_day@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Responsible for educational programs for dairy farmers, youth with an interest in dairy projects and the general public with an interest in dairy foods and the dairy industry.

Erin Eure
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Commercial Fruits and Vegetables
Phone: (252) 357-1400
Email: erin_eure@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provides educational opportunities and technical support to commercial fruit and vegetable growers, agents, and industry in northeastern NC.

Tiffany Hancock
Title: County Extension Marketing and Media Support Specialist
Phone: (919) 545-8304
Email: tiffany_hancock@ncsu.edu

Marissa Herchler
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Animal Food Safety (FSMA Programs)
Phone: (919) 515-5396
Email: marissa_herchler@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Marissa is an Area Specialized Agent for animal food safety, with emphasis on the new Food Safety Modernization Act rules, as they apply to feed mills in North Carolina. Please contact Marissa with any FSMA related questions, or PCQI training inquiries.

Lynette Johnston
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Food Safety
Phone: (919) 515-0303
Email: lynette_johnston@ncsu.edu

Matt Jones
Title: Extension Agent, Agriculture - Commercial Ornamental and Consumer Horticulture
Phone: (919) 542-8243
Email: matt_jones@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Ornamental nurseries and greenhouses, landscape professionals, and home gardeners.

Stacey Jones
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Commercial Nursery and Greenhouse
Phone: (704) 920-3310
Email: stacey_jones@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: I work with commercial greenhouses and nurseries to help them with growing related issues. These issues range from pests (insect, disease, and weeds), substrates, nutrition, and other miscellaneous topics.

Peggie Lewis Joyce
Title: Area 4-H Agent - Central Region
Phone: (336) 242-2080
Email: peggie_lewis@ncsu.edu

Brandi King
Title: County Extension Administrative Assistant
Phone: (919) 542-8202
Email: blking4@ncsu.edu

Liz Mauney
Title: 4-H Program Assistant, 4-H Youth Development
Phone: (919) 542-8257
Email: enmauney@ncsu.edu

Ashley Robbins
Title: Area Specialized Agent - Dairy
Phone: (919) 542-8203
Email: ashley_robbins@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Marti Day and I are the Area Specialized Dairy Agents - the county-based arm of the Cooperative Extension Dairy Team. We are out here in the counties to help you set and reach your farm, family and business goals. We have collaborative expertise in the areas of Waste Management, Udder Health, Cow Comfort, Nutrition and Forage Management with specialties in (Ashley)Reproduction, Records Management, Animal Health and (Marti)Alternative Markets, Organic Dairy, Grazing Management, and On-farm Processing. We hope to provide comprehensive educational programs for our farmers, consumers and youth for every county across the state. We are here for you by phone, email or text and look forward to working with you!

Debbie Roos
Title: Extension Agent, Agriculture - Sustainable/Organic Production
Phone: (919) 542-8244
Email: debbie_roos@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Local Foods Coordinator; sustainable/organic production for diversified small farms; commercial vegetable and fruit production; farmers' markets and direct marketing; beekeeping; pollinator conservation; forestry

Chip Simmons
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Food Safety
Phone: (919) 414-5632
Email: odsimmon@ncsu.edu

Phyllis Smith
Title: Extension Agent, Family and Consumer Sciences
Phone: (919) 218-2551
Email: phyllis_smith@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Registered Dietitian Areas responsible for Health and Wellness, Food Safety and Nutrition.

Mitch Woodward
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Watersheds and Water Quality
Phone: (919) 414-3873
Email: mdwoodwa@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: NC Cooperative Extension's Goals include: - NC's natural resources and environmental quality will be protected, conserved and enhanced. - NC will have profitable, environmentally sustainable plant, animal and food systems. Protecting our environmental resources, particularly drinking water quality, is a top priority in NC. NC Cooperative Extension is a leader in teaching, researching, and accelerating the adoption of effective water quality protection practices.

IX. Contact Information

Chatham County Center
1192 US 64W Business
Suite 400
Pittsboro, NC 27312

Phone: (919) 542-8202
Fax: (919) 542-8246
URL: http://chatham.ces.ncsu.edu