2018 Chatham County Program Impact Report

Approved: January 25, 2019

I. Executive Summary

In 2018, under the guidance of 14 specialized, community-based advisory committees, Extension professionals housed in the Chatham County Center worked diligently to address the issues of positive youth development, health, wellness, nutrition, local foods, and agricultural profitability and sustainability.

This past year, the staff of the Chatham County Center made 692,997 face-to-face (workshops, field days, camps, etc.) and non-face-to-face (phone calls, emails, social media posts, etc.) contacts. Likewise, Chatham County is blessed to have the invaluable help of skillful volunteers, and without their assistance, our outreach efforts would not have had the same impact. In 2018, the Chatham County Center utilized the services of over 1,500 volunteers who worked in excess of 6,800 hours; on behalf of the Cooperative Extension, those volunteers contributed to over 12,500 known client contacts. This body of volunteer work was valued in excess of $168,000. In addition to volunteer contributions, Extension staff were able to secure over $94,000 in additional fiscal resources by way of grants, donations, sponsorships, and foundation funding. Below are some of the most notable programming highlights from the Chatham County Center:

• The Family and Consumer Sciences Program worked to improve the health, nutrition, and overall well-being of individuals in our community. SNAP-Ed (Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program – Education) classes were presented to 2nd grade students to increase their awareness of the need for healthy food choices and physical activity; ninety-one percent of parents reported observing their children eating more fruits/vegetables and drinking water more often as a result of programming. In partnership with the Chatham County Health Department and Chatham County Public Schools, ServSafe food safety classes were conducted for over 60 food service employees and students within Chatham County; as a result, 85% of participants successfully received certification, improving food handling practices county-wide.
• Agriculture Agents worked to improve both the profitability and sustainability of Chatham’s local agriculture sector, all while advocating for the conservation of our natural resources in conjunction to promoting environmentally friendly practices. In an effort to improve profitability in a volatile market, dairy farmers received training related to alternative markets, value added products, technology changes for conventional and organic milk production, cow health, and grazing systems. In a joint program with the Chatham County Department of Public Health, Chatham County residents improved their knowledge of the maintenance and operation of wells and septic systems, including how to make proper plants selections in the vicinity of septic fields. Fall Vegetable Gardening in Containers Workshops empowered two-thirds of participants to start vegetable gardening at home, while nearly 100% of the landowners attending the Aquatic Weed Identification and Management Workshop indicated they would implement the Extension-recommended best management practices for controlling weeds in farm ponds. Grant funding was received to develop evaluation instruments to document the need to reopen small scale poultry processing plants; as a result, it is hoped that this expressed need will act as a catalyst for rural, limited-resource farmers in Chatham in need of such services. A series of pesticide recertification courses were administered to local private and commercial producers, enabling them to maintain their licenses, learn practices to decrease the use of pesticides, and better understand how to safeguard themselves and the local environment. A Chatham County Hay Directory was initiated in 2018 as a comprehensive guide for those seeking to buy or sale hay locally; this resource has proved to be invaluable, especially in times of natural disasters that have plagued our region. Thirteen Enhancing Sustainability Workshops were conducted in 2018 related to organic certification, produce safety for farmers, industrial hemp production, forestry, beneficial insects, and pollinator conservation. One of the first industrial hemp production workshops in North Carolina was conducted in Chatham County and attracted 250 participants from 30 counties and four states to learn about hemp program regulations, hemp production, and processing.
• Chatham County 4-H provided positive youth development programs to foster invaluable skillsets in youth needed to succeed both in and outside of the classroom. During 2018, 2,071 Chatham County students participated in 4-H School Enrichment Programs, with 90% of participating youth demonstrating enhanced conceptual understanding related to NC Common Core and Essential Standards currently tested in the classroom. In an effort to address summer learning loss, funds totaling over $28,000 were secured in donations and grant opportunities designated for at-risk and underprivileged youth. As a result, over 200 Chatham County youth were able to participate in 4-H Summer Camp programming, demonstrating marked gains in leadership skill sets (90%) and STEM-related field knowledge (87%).

II. County Background

The 2010 Census denoted Chatham County's population is 63,505, an increase of 28.74% since 2000. Chatham County is 1 of 15 counties in North Carolina that has experienced a growth rate over 25% since 2000. The Raleigh/Durham Metropolitan Statistical Area of which Chatham County is included tied for the third fastest growing area in the nation at 41.8%. With Chatham County being sandwiched between the triangle and triad metropolitan areas in North Carolina, there is a significant amount of pressure on the agrarian lifestyle of the county from those seeking the rural setting but lacking an understanding of what that entails.

Agriculture and agribusiness continue to be the largest industries in Chatham County. The 2012 Census of Agriculture reported that there are 1,139 farms in the County, resulting in a 4.4% increase in the number of farms from the 2007 Census of Agriculture. The county ranks 2nd in the state in beef cow production, 4th in all cattle production, 16th in broiler production, 11th in the number of milk cows, and 5th in hay production. In addition, Chatham County is 19th in the state in livestock, dairy, and poultry income; it also ranks 29th in total farm income. Our agricultural income from livestock was driven down considerably by the closure of Townsends Poultry, but we are starting to see some rebound and are expecting considerable growth with the opening of Mountaire Farms' processing plant in Spring 2019. Chatham County continues to be considered a hotbed of organic production and continues to increase the number of small-scale vegetable and specialty farms.

During our last needs assessment, with participation from the Chatham County Extension Advisory Leadership Council, over 350 Chatham citizens provided valuable input. The top three identified needs consisted of the following: (1)environmental and natural resources management, (2) agricultural and food supplies, and (3) foods and nutrition, specifically with a focus on youth obesity.

As more urban populations move into Chatham, there is a greater need to educate those individuals about the importance of agriculture and agribusiness; this warrants a substantial need to increase the overall agricultural literacy of our county's citizens. We have worked with the County Commissioners’ Agricultural Advisory Board to develop a county-wide farmland protection plan and are implementing some of those recommendations to strengthen the agricultural industry in the county. With the completion and adoption of the Chatham County Comprehensive Plan, we will work earnestly to introduce strategies developed through this study in our own Extension programming. Our county office will address and promote the two main goals identified in the plan: (1) preserve, protect, and enable agriculture and forestry and (2) preserve the rural character and lifestyle of Chatham County. Overall, as recommended in the plan, we will act to support agriculture through increased education, outreach, and training efforts.

Production practices, bio-security, nutrient management, and marketing workshops for small scale poultry producers will be conducted to assist existing and new farmers succeed in these new and emerging poultry markets. Educational programs with an environmental protection aspect will be provided in areas such as litter and nutrient management, dead bird disposal, water quality issues, biosecurity, diversity, storm water management, farm profitability, waste recertification, and pesticide education. With over 59% of the land in timber, we will continue to help forest landowners to improve their best management practices, increase forest profitability, and improve forest health. Chatham County enjoys a national reputation for its abundance of small, diversified farms that yield produce, flowers, herbs, meat, poultry, dairy, and value-added products. This local food production depends on pollinators such as honey bees and native bees to produce high quality fruits and vegetables. Pollinator habitat demonstration projects and other educational programs will promote the importance of protecting the pollinators that local farmers rely on to pollinate their crops.

According to the Behavior Risk Factor Surveillance Survey, 61.6% of the county residents are overweight or obese. Twenty-one percent of residents continue to consume five or less fruits or vegetables a day. Even with the increased awareness of the benefits of being physical active, only 28% of the residents meet daily recommendations for being physically active. Cooperative Extension programs such as Eat Smart / Move More / Weigh Less, Junior Chefs, Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Education, and Youth in Motion will promote healthy lifestyles with reduction in body weights and an increase in physical activity for both adults and children.

Chatham County 4-H is successfully engaging over 3,700 young people from across the county in various youth educational programs such as community clubs, school enrichment programs, special interest events, and camps. With the generous support of the local United Way of Chatham County and partnerships with local agencies, 4-H is able to provide unique, quality programming that provides youth with new knowledge and skill sets in areas of leadership development, nutrition, citizenship, and STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics).

III. Objectives to Address the Cooperative Extension Long Range Plan

North Carolina's plant production systems will become more profitable and sustainable.

Value* Outcome Description
1500Number of crop (all plant systems) producers increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, and/or skills as related to: 1. Best management production practices (cultural, nutrient, and genetics) 2. Pest/insect, disease, weed, wildlife management 3. Financial/Farm management tools and practices (business, marketing, government policy, human resources) 4. Alternative agriculture, bioenergy, and value-added enterprises
1Number of Extension initiated and controlled County demonstration test sites (new required for GLF/PSI reporting)
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
880Number of crop (all plant systems) producers adopting best management practices, including those practices related to nutrient management, conservation, production, cultivars, pest management (weeds, diseases, insects), business management, and marketing
173000Net income gains realized by the adoption of best management practices, including those practices related to nutrient management, conservation, production, cultivars, pest management (weeds, diseases, insects), business management, and marketing
185Number of producers reporting increased dollar returns per acre or reduced costs per acre
60Number of producers reporting reduction in fertilizer used per acre
102Number of acres in conservation tillage or other Best Management Practice
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

North Carolina's animal production systems will become more profitable and sustainable.

Value* Outcome Description
1491Number of animal producers increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, and/or skills as related to: 1. Best management production practices (cultural, nutrient, and genetics) 2. Pest/insect, disease, weed, wildlife management 3. Financial/Farm management tools and practices (business, marketing, government policy, human resources) 4. Alternative agriculture, bioenergy, and value-added enterprises
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
179Number of animal producers adopting Extension-recommended best management practices, including those practices related to husbandry, improved planning, marketing, and financial practices
1062000Net income gains by producers adopting Extension-recommended best management practices, including those practices related to husbandry, improved planning, marketing, and financial practices
150Number of animal producers implementing Extension-recommended best management practices for animal waste management
1250000Tons of livestock organic by-products utilized (nutrients from waste, compost, etc)
3000000Net income gain by using livestock organic by-products instead of synthetic fertilizers
106Number of waste management certifications gained or maintained due to Extension education efforts
925000Number of acres where Extension-recommended waste analysis was used for proper land application
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Producers will increase sales of food locally to more agriculturally aware consumers through market development, producer and consumer education, and new farmer and infrastructure support.

Value* Outcome Description
1410Number of producers who gain skills or knowledge to increase production for local markets.
3635Number of adults (including producers, food business owners, etc.) who improved knowledge of local food and agricultural systems.
101Number of children/youth who improved knowledge of local food and agricultural systems.
825Number of producers who improve local food marketing skills or knowledge.
55Number of individuals who learn how to prepare local foods, including through use of home food preservation techniques.
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
20Number of new and existing access points for consumers that expand or improve their offering of local fruits and vegetables. Access points include farmers markets, retail stores, school food programs, community gardens, institutions other than schools (e.g. hospitals, universities, etc.), and other systems/access points not noted (e.g. restaurants, etc.).
280Number of producers selling their agricultural products to local markets (direct, intermediated/food service, institutional) for consumption in NC.
245Number of producers who diversified their marketing strategies into local markets (direct, intermediated/food service, institutional).
3000000Gross sales of local foods by producers. (Increase in gross sales to be calculated at the state level.)
134Number of producers (and other members of the local food supply chain) who have increased revenue.
33Number of new farms (beginning farmers) selling into local markets for local consumption (in this reporting period).
10Number of new local food value chain businesses, other than farms (in this reporting period).
85Number of individuals who begin home food production by starting to raise backyard livestock.
1400Number of pounds of fresh produce donated for consumption by vulnerable populations.
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Youth and adults will address community issues and/or challenges through volunteerism.

Value* Outcome Description
70Number of adult participants acquiring the skills needed to serve as a volunteer
26Number of youth participants reporting aspirations to serve in new or expanded volunteer roles in community
42Number of adult participants reporting aspirations to serve in new or expanded volunteer roles in community
36Number of hours adult volunteer training conducted
22Number of hours youth volunteer training conducted
53Number new volunteers recruited
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
148Increased number of hours contributed by trained youth volunteers
810Increased number of hours contributed by trained adult volunteers
26Number of youth volunteers serving in new or expanded roles within Extension
42Number of adult volunteers serving in new or expanded roles within Extension
26Number of youth volunteers recruiting and/or training new volunteers
42Number of adult volunteers recruiting and/or training new volunteers
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Futures that Work: School to Career Pathways

Value* Outcome Description
82Number of teachers trained in 4-H STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) curriculum
1714Number of youth (students) increasing knowledge in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math)
919Total number of female participants in STEM program
1721Number of youth (students) increasing knowledge of career/employability skills
153Number of adults increasing knowledge of career/employability skills
1204Number of youth (students) increasing knowledge of entrepreneurship
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
78Number of teachers using 4-H STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) curriculum in their classrooms
1714Number of youth (students) gaining knowledge in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math)
1723Number of youth (students) gaining career / employability skills
78Number of adults gaining career / employability skills
1714Number of youth (students) gaining entrepreneurship skills
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Consumers and communities will enhance the value of plants, animals, and landscapes while conserving valuable natural resources and protecting the environment.

Value* Outcome Description
105Number of participants improving knowledge, attitude, skills and aspirations regarding gardening and landscape practices including plant selection and placement, turfgrass management, soil management, growing food, water conservation and water quality preservation, storm water and erosion management, green waste management, pest and wildlife management
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
95Number of participants who use extension-recommended best management practices in landscapes, turf, and gardens, including pest (insect, weed, disease) management, fertility management, water conservation, water quality preservation and pruning techniques
22Number of participants who use extension-recommended pest management practices in homes, public facilities, businesses or in community pest management programs
58Number of participants selecting appropriate landscape plants (adapted, drought tolerant, appropriate size, etc.)
25Number of participants growing food for home consumption
3164Value of produce grown for home consumption
15Number of participants implementing extension-recommended practices to conserve water use and protect water qualty
20Number of participants implementing extension-recommended practices to conserve water use and protect water qualtiy
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Youth and adult program participants will make healthy food choices, achieve the recommended amount of physical activity and reduce risk factors for chronic diseases.

Value* Impact Description
278Number of adults increasing their fruit and vegetables consumption
244Number of youth increasing their fruit and vegetable consumption
190Number of participants increasing their physical activity
190Number of participants who consume less sodium in their diet
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

IV. Number of Contacts Made by Extension

Type of ContactNumber
Face-to-face* 34,628
Non face-to-face** 657,814
Total by Extension staff in 2018 692,442
* Face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make directly with individuals through one-on-one visits, meetings, and other activities where staff members work directly with individuals.
** Non face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make indirectly with individuals by telephone, email, newsletters, news articles, radio, television, and other means.

V. Designated Grants Received by Extension

Type of GrantAmount
Contracts/Grants $16,607.00
Gifts/Donations $14,733.58
In-Kind Grants/Donations $4,990.00
United Way/Foundations $21,995.00
User Fees $36,335.00
Total $94,660.58

VI. Volunteer Involvement in Extension Programs

Number of Volunteers* Number of Volunteer Hours Known client contacts by volunteers Dollar Value at 25.43
4-H: 961 3,721 10,340 $ 94,625.00
Advisory Leadership System: 125 304 1,271 $ 7,731.00
Extension Community Association: 0 0 0 $ 0.00
Extension Master Gardener: 332 2,339 568 $ 59,481.00
Other: 143 456 415 $ 11,596.00
Total: 1561 6820 12594 $ 173,433.00
* The number of volunteers reflects the overall number of volunteers for multiple events.

VII. Membership of Advisory Leadership System

Chatham County Advisory Leadership Council
Bob Atwater
Chris Bouton
Ron Dameron
Cindy Dameron
Edsel Daniel
Tommy Glosson
Mary Dickerson
Clarence Durham
Dr. Barbara Walton
Brenda Williams
Larilee Isley
Charles Lutterloh
Sharon Day
Cindy Poindexter
Maria Correa
Cecil Wilson
John Wait
Chatham County 4-H and Youth Advisory Committee
Julia Austin
Mary Dickerson
Laura Dickerson
Gail Nelson
Leah Nelson
Phyllis Graham
Katelyn Batchelor
Loretta Batchelor
Chatham County Family & Consumer Education Advisory Committee
Tammy Matthews
Susan Hardy
Jennifer Parks
Chatham County Livestock Advisory Committee
Kathy White
Joe Wachs
Loretta Batchelor
Thomas K. (Chip) Price, III
Phillip Watson
Brent Norwood
Todd White
Clarence Durham
Scotty Scott
Corey Tally
William Culberson
Chatham County Dairy Advisory Committee
Neill Lindley
Leigh Lane
Chris Bowman
Keith Hockett
George Teague
Patrick Purcell
Eddie Patrick
Patrick Purcell
Neil Moye
Chatham County Horse Advisory Committee
Margaret Moore
Gary Moon
Charlie Bolton
Jim Thomas
Donald Whitt
Marty Allen
Janet Allen
Larilee Isley
Area Commerical Poultry Advisory Committee
Phil Bare
Todd Brooks
Jeff Beavers
Keith McDonald
Richard Williams
Brad Gee
Allan’s Foods Representative

Chatham County Horticulture Advisory Committee
Rob Bergmueller
Laurie Cousart
Melinda Fitzgerald
Maggie Frantz
David Higginbotham
Rene Higginbotham
Audrey Joy
Betsy Kraus
Keith Larkin
Bryan Lowrance
Paige Moody
Daniel Sundberg
Chatham County Sustainable Agriculture Advisory Committee
Cathy Jones
Robin Kohanowich
Henry Outz
Fleming Pfann
Bobby Tucker
Judy Lessler
Ben Shields
Beekeeping Advisory Committee
Pat Weisbrodt
Judy Pick
Maggie Frantz
Phyllis Fleming
Moya Hallstein
Ray Wise
Tom Buob
Dairy Youth Advisory Committee
Janice Lindley
Jean Thomas
Mike Strickland
Samantha Gasson
Wayne Lutz
Margie Grubb
Connie Kivett
Chatham County Agriculture Advisory Board
Esta Cohen
Sharon Day
Dr. John Dykers
Terrill Ellington
Cathy Jones
Tandy Jones
Bobby Tucker
Joseph Wachs
Wesley Hancock

VIII. Staff Membership

Ginger Cunningham
Title: County Extension Director and Extension Agent, 4-H Youth Development
Phone: (919) 542-8249
Email: ginger_cunningham@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provides administrative leadership to Chatham County Center personnel and assists youth with educational and enrichment opportunities related to 4-H club, camping, and school enrichment (4-H STEM) programming.

Victoria Brewer
Title: Extension Agent, 4-H Youth Development
Phone: (919) 545-8303
Email: victoria_brewer@ncsu.edu

Daniel Campeau
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Poultry
Phone: (919) 542-8202
Email: dan_campeau@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Work mainly with Commercial Poultry industry. I also work with small scale poultry production. Service area is now the North Central District from Guilford to Halifax with the southern edge being Chatham and Wake county respectively.

Marti Day
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Dairy
Phone: (919) 542-8202
Email: marti_day@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Responsible for educational programs for dairy farmers, youth with an interest in dairy projects and the general public with an interest in dairy foods and the dairy industry.

Erin Eure
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Commercial Fruits and Vegetables
Phone: (252) 357-1400
Email: erin_eure@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provides educational opportunities and technical support to commercial fruit and vegetable growers, agents, and industry in northeastern NC.

Tiffany Hancock
Title: County Extension Marketing and Media Support Specialist
Phone: (919) 545-8304
Email: tiffany_hancock@ncsu.edu

Marissa Herchler
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Animal Food Safety (FSMA Programs)
Phone: (919) 515-5396
Email: marissa_herchler@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Marissa is an Area Specialized Agent for animal food safety, with emphasis on the new Food Safety Modernization Act rules, as they apply to feed mills in North Carolina. Please contact Marissa with any FSMA related questions, or PCQI training inquiries.

Lynette Johnston
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Food Safety
Phone: (919) 515-0303
Email: lynette_johnston@ncsu.edu

Matt Jones
Title: Extension Agent, Agriculture - Commercial Ornamental and Consumer Horticulture
Phone: (919) 542-8243
Email: matt_jones@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Ornamental nurseries and greenhouses, landscape professionals, and home gardeners.

Stacey Jones
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Commercial Nursery and Greenhouse
Phone: (704) 920-3310
Email: stacey_jones@ncsu.edu

Peggie Lewis Joyce
Title: Area 4-H Agent - Central Region
Phone: (336) 242-2080
Email: peggie_lewis@ncsu.edu

Bill Lord
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Water Resources
Phone: (919) 496-3344
Email: william_lord@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Water quality education and technical assistance

Liz Mauney
Title: 4-H Program Assistant, 4-H Youth Development
Phone: (919) 542-8257
Email: enmauney@ncsu.edu

Rachel McDowell
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Consumer and Retail Food Safety
Phone: (919) 515-9155
Email: romcdowe@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Support FCS Agents in delivering timely and evidence-based food safety education and information to stakeholders in NC.

Ashley Robbins
Title: Extension Agent, Agriculture - Livestock, Equine, Forages and Field Crops
Phone: (919) 542-8203
Email: ashley_robbins@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Livestock, Equine, Forages and Field Crops

Debbie Roos
Title: Extension Agent, Agriculture - Sustainable/Organic Production
Phone: (919) 542-8244
Email: debbie_roos@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Local Foods Coordinator; sustainable/organic production for diversified small farms; commercial vegetable and fruit production; farmers' markets and direct marketing; beekeeping; pollinator conservation; forestry

Chip Simmons
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Food Safety
Phone: (919) 414-5632
Email: odsimmon@ncsu.edu

Phyllis Smith
Title: Extension Agent, Family and Consumer Sciences
Phone: (919) 542-8247
Email: phyllis_smith@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Registered Dietitian Areas responsible for Health and Wellness, Food Safety and Nutrition.

Mitch Woodward
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Watersheds and Water Quality
Phone: (919) 250-1112
Email: mdwoodwa@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: NC Cooperative Extension's Goals include: - NC's natural resources and environmental quality will be protected, conserved and enhanced. - NC will have profitable, environmentally sustainable plant, animal and food systems. Protecting our environmental resources, particularly drinking water quality, is a top priority in NC. NC Cooperative Extension is a leader in teaching, researching, and accelerating the adoption of effective water quality protection practices.

IX. Contact Information

Chatham County Center
1192 US 64W Business
Suite 400
Pittsboro, NC 27312

Phone: (919) 542-8202
Fax: (919) 542-8246
URL: http://chatham.ces.ncsu.edu