2018 Chowan County Program Impact Report

Approved: January 23, 2019

I. Executive Summary

In 2018 Chowan County Cooperative Extension reached 49,008 people face-to-face. Program objectives included leadership development, volunteerism, school to career pathways, profitable and sustainable agriculture systems, urban and consumer agriculture, safety and security of our food and farm systems, and healthy eating and chronic disease reduction. In addition, the Chowan County Extension Center received $18,125 in outside funding for 2018.

4-H
The 4-H Youth Development Program provided programming that encouraged exploration of school-to-career opportunities and volunteer readiness. Approximately 18,013 youth participated in a variety of programs focusing on developing essential life skills. Successful programs this year included 4-H Embryology in the schools, the Kids and Cops Program, and 4-H Residential Camp. The Chowan County Livestock show and sale reached 69 youth, 4-Hers learned responsibility, good sportsmanship skills, leadership, and dedication by raising and showing their 4-H project. This program continues each year to teach the 4-Hers about the agriculture industry. 4-H Summer programs included 4-H Congress, Babysitters Backpack, Kids & Cops, and 4-H Jr. Chef Program.

4-H EFNEP
The 4-H Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program partnered with area schools to lead curriculum emphasizing healthy food choices, physical activity, and food safety. As a result, EFNEP made a difference for 1,417 Limited Resource Youth Nutrition contacts. Education helps to teach youth healthier ways of eating and being active. When youth take home health information for the adults in the household this helps to reduce health care cost and chronic diseases in our communities. 85% of EFNEP participants improved dietary intake. 39% of youth increased daily physical activity, 41% of youth gained knowledge in food resource management and 39% improved there food safety habits. Chowan and Perquimans Counties EFNEP program obtained $5600 in funding and support from local efforts.

Agriculture
The Chowan County Agriculture Program resulted in 36 participants increased their knowledge about best management practices, natural resources, and environmental issues through winter production meetings and individual contacts. Chowan farmers used North Carolina Cooperative Extension recommendations for variety selection, seeding rates, use of different modes of action chemicals for grass and weed control. 225 participants increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, and/or skills in best management production practices, pest/insect, disease, weed, wildlife management, financial/farm management tools and practices, alternative agriculture, bioenergy, and value-added enterprises. 225 crop producers in the Northeast adopting best management practices, including those practices related to nutrient management, conservation, production, cultivars, pest management, business management, and marketing. In 2018 there were four Extension initiated and controlled County demonstration test sites.

Consumer Horticulture
The Chowan County Consumer Horticulture program resulted in 82 participants improving knowledge, skills, and aspirations regarding gardening and landscape practices including plant selection and placement, turf grass management, soil management, growing food, water conservation, water quality preservation and pest management. Through programs like the Albemarle Area Landscape School, Extension Master Gardener, Junior Master Gardener and Gardening in the Albemarle, 23 participants saved more than $10,115 from the use of Extension recommended best management practices in landscapes turf, and gardens. In 2018, 44 local residents of Chowan, Gates & Perquimans County were either certified or recertified as Extension Master Gardener Volunteers by the local Cooperative Extension office. In addition, 44 Extension Master Gardeners contributed more than 1,919 hours of volunteer service – a value of approximately $47,380 to the local county center.

FCS
Family & Consumer Science program contacts were 2939 these programs included Safe Plates, Snap-Ed Program, Healthy Cooking classes, and Extension Master Food Volunteer Program. 11 area restaurant owners, managers, and food service employees from the Chowan area participated in the 16-hour training and Safe Plates certification test. Food Safety programming also included team teaching with Albemarle Regional Health Services ServSafe classes in Pasquotank County. The Chowan County Senior Health Insurance Information Program (SHIIP) Coordinator met with 308 Medicare clients in 2018. SHIIP information was presented and beneficiaries were counseling about Medicare questions and concerns. During Medicare counseling appointments 189 beneficiaries were served during open enrollment with $389,945 being returned back to the hands of the Chowan County Medicare beneficiaries.

Aquaculture
Accomplishments for the Northeast Extension District Area Specialized Agent (ASA) – Aquaculture program included working with producers in the state’s hybrid striped bass industry. One producer called the ASA on a weekend asking for help with a pond of fish worth over $42,000 off feed and exhibiting unusual behavior. After checking the pond’s water quality, including sampling for toxic algae, the ASA necropsied fish and detected some gill parasites. A copper sulfate treatment was calculated for and applied by the producer. The next day the producer reported the fish behaving normal and feeding vigorously. Another hybrid striped bass producer called the ASA about fish in one of his ponds behaving similarly to a toxic algae event. The ASA obtained a sample of the pond water and rushed it to the NCSU Center for Aquatic Ecology (CAE) in Raleigh for help in identifying possible toxic algae. No toxic algae were identified so the producer could concentrate on the pond water quality, saving the producer $1000 in treatment chemicals and saving over $50,000 worth of fish. The ASA is always responding to producers looking for ways to maximize profits and yields from their ponds. One catfish producer questioned the ASA about an alternative crop to his catfish that was netting less than $200 per acre per year. The ASA suggested crawfish using the prawn model of production that could net approximately $2500 per acre per year. Another producer questioned the ASA about the use of freshwater mussels for water quality remediation. Since this species is not on the list of pre-approved species that can be produced in the state, the ASA contacted the NC Wildlife Resources Commission about potential approval. Even though the request was denied, the producer was saved considerable time and effort not having to petition the Commission approval. The ASA also works with non-commercial aquaculture individuals. A homeowners association (HOA) was considering spending over $20,000 to add a well to maintain a pond’s depth. The ASA evaluated the situation and determined the well was not necessary, saving the HOA the money. Overall, net income gains by producers adopting Extension-recommended best management practices including practices related to husbandry, improved planning, marketing, and financial practices was over $142,000.

II. County Background

Chowan County was first established in 1685. Edenton, the county seat and only major town, was incorporated in 1722. The desirable location on the Albemarle Sound and Chowan River made Chowan County the focal point for the Albemarle region, and for a time Edenton served as the capital of the colony. At 233 square miles, Chowan is the smallest county in NC. It is bordered to the north by Gates County, the east by Perquimans County, and the south and west by the Albemarle Sound and Chowan River, respectively.

Chowan County has a population of 14,394. Sixty-two percent of the population is white, 34% is black, and 3.5% are hispanic or of some other ethnicity. There are 3,067 youth between the ages of five and nineteen. The county has 5,967 households with a median household income of $38,759.

Agriculture has long been a primary industry in Chowan County. The production of peanuts, cotton, corn, soybeans, small grains, clary sage, vegetables, nursery crops, and livestock are produced on about 58,146 of the county's 73,000 acres. Agricultural production generates approximately $50 million yearly through farm income and continues to drive the local economy. Historical revenue streams such as boat building, construction, and tourism have suffered under the present economy.

Though growth and development have stalled, property values remain relatively high due to the desirable real estate found in the area. Chowan has become a popular destination for retirees which is reflected in the high percentage of adults 65 and over (23.1%; state average 12.7%). Limited employment opportunities combined with a high cost of living make it more difficult for the local population to remain in their homes or to find affordable health care. The poverty level still remains high at 19.4%

Limited employment opportunities also create hardships for the youth population in Chowan County. With the trend to become competitive in a global marketplace rather than just at the local level, it is now imperative that youth build essential life skills beyond their school environment in order to become more well rounded, prepared individuals for the work force.

Information from our most recent environmental scan combined with feedback from the County Advisory system and state program initiatives aligned with the mission of Cooperative Extension have identified priority issues in several areas including:
•Building youth character, life skills, and leadership development
•Promoting proper nutrition, wellness, and a healthy lifestyle
•Maintaining agricultural profitability through demonstrations with new technology, production methods, and crops/products
•Pesticide safety
•Local Food Production & Consumption through food safety trainings (for commercial and home producers), farm:city relationships, community gardens and farmers markets
•Budget Management through promoting energy efficiency, farm production savings, home production savings and youth saving strategies.

III. Objectives to Address the Cooperative Extension Long Range Plan

North Carolina's plant production systems will become more profitable and sustainable.

Value* Outcome Description
107Number of crop (all plant systems) producers increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, and/or skills as related to: 1. Best management production practices (cultural, nutrient, and genetics) 2. Pest/insect, disease, weed, wildlife management 3. Financial/Farm management tools and practices (business, marketing, government policy, human resources) 4. Alternative agriculture, bioenergy, and value-added enterprises
6Number of Extension initiated and controlled County demonstration test sites (new required for GLF/PSI reporting)
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
102Number of crop (all plant systems) producers adopting best management practices, including those practices related to nutrient management, conservation, production, cultivars, pest management (weeds, diseases, insects), business management, and marketing
16500Net income gains realized by the adoption of best management practices, including those practices related to nutrient management, conservation, production, cultivars, pest management (weeds, diseases, insects), business management, and marketing
4Number of producers reporting increased dollar returns per acre or reduced costs per acre
1Number of producers reporting reduction in fertilizer used per acre
0Number of acres in conservation tillage or other Best Management Practice
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

North Carolina's animal production systems will become more profitable and sustainable.

Value* Outcome Description
126Number of animal producers increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, and/or skills as related to: 1. Best management production practices (cultural, nutrient, and genetics) 2. Pest/insect, disease, weed, wildlife management 3. Financial/Farm management tools and practices (business, marketing, government policy, human resources) 4. Alternative agriculture, bioenergy, and value-added enterprises
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
29Number of animal producers adopting Extension-recommended best management practices, including those practices related to husbandry, improved planning, marketing, and financial practices
222583Net income gains by producers adopting Extension-recommended best management practices, including those practices related to husbandry, improved planning, marketing, and financial practices
17Number of animal producers implementing Extension-recommended best management practices for animal waste management
17Number of waste management certifications gained or maintained due to Extension education efforts
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Producers will increase sales of food locally to more agriculturally aware consumers through market development, producer and consumer education, and new farmer and infrastructure support.

Agricultural producers, workers, food handlers and consumers will adopt safer food and agricultural production, handling, and distribution practices that reduce workplace and home injuries/illnesses, enhance food security, and increase the quality and safety of food that North Carolinians prepare and consume.

Value* Outcome Description
17Number of commercial/public operators trained
0Number of pesticide application credit hours provided
49Number of persons certified in Pork Quality Assurance (PQA) or Beef Quality Assurance (BQA)
12Number of participants participating in AgriSafe personal protective equipment (PPE) selection or fit testing
18Number of food service employees receiving ServSafe certification
6Number of participants trained in safe home food handling, preservation, or preparation practices
25TOTAL number of food handlers receiving food safety training and education in safe food handling practices (new required data for federal reporting)
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
1Number of participants that have adopted farm safety practices
20Number of participants implementing ServSafe
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Individuals and groups will acquire leadership and decision making capacities needed to guide and actively participate in local and state organizations.

Value* Outcome Description
6Number of adults increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
2Number of adults assuming new/expanded leadership roles in the community
10Number of youth increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
6Number of adults increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
2Number of adults assuming new/expanded leadership roles in the community
10Number of youth increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Youth and adults will address community issues and/or challenges through volunteerism.

Value* Outcome Description
17Number of adult participants acquiring the skills needed to serve as a volunteer
16Number of adult participants reporting aspirations to serve in new or expanded volunteer roles in community
34Number of hours adult volunteer training conducted
15Number new volunteers recruited
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
652Increased number of hours contributed by trained youth volunteers
10Increased number of hours contributed by trained adult volunteers
15Number of adult volunteers serving in new or expanded roles within Extension
3Number of adult volunteers serving in new or expanded roles beyond Extension, including community boards and task forces
3Number of adult volunteers recruiting and/or training new volunteers
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Community members, organizations and local government will engage in collaborative dialog and decision-making to build economically, socially and environmentally resilient communities. This will be done through inclusive engagement, partnership building, and/or community planning.

Futures that Work: School to Career Pathways

North Carolinians will make decisions and adopt practices that implement effective resource protection and conservation.

Consumers and communities will enhance the value of plants, animals, and landscapes while conserving valuable natural resources and protecting the environment.

Value* Outcome Description
28Number of participants improving knowledge, attitude, skills and aspirations regarding gardening and landscape practices including plant selection and placement, turfgrass management, soil management, growing food, water conservation and water quality preservation, storm water and erosion management, green waste management, pest and wildlife management
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
26Number of participants who use extension-recommended best management practices in landscapes, turf, and gardens, including pest (insect, weed, disease) management, fertility management, water conservation, water quality preservation and pruning techniques
2975Total cost savings from the use of extension-recommended best management practices in landscapes, turf, and gardens, including pest (insect, weed, disease) management, fertility management, water conservation, water quality preservation and pruning techniques
24Number of participants selecting appropriate landscape plants (adapted, drought tolerant, appropriate size, etc.)
3230Cost savings from the appropriate selection of landscape plants
15Number of participants growing food for home consumption
1411Value of produce grown for home consumption
2499Costs savings from implementing extension-recommended practices to conserve water use and protect water qualtiy
23Number of participants implementing extension-recommended practices to conserve water use and protect water qualtiy
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Youth and adult program participants will make healthy food choices, achieve the recommended amount of physical activity and reduce risk factors for chronic diseases.

IV. Other Objectives

Food Insecurity

V. Number of Contacts Made by Extension

Type of ContactNumber
Face-to-face* 15,529
Non face-to-face** 33,341
Total by Extension staff in 2018 48,870
* Face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make directly with individuals through one-on-one visits, meetings, and other activities where staff members work directly with individuals.
** Non face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make indirectly with individuals by telephone, email, newsletters, news articles, radio, television, and other means.

VI. Designated Grants Received by Extension

Type of GrantAmount
Contracts/Grants $12,305.00
Gifts/Donations $4,420.00
In-Kind Grants/Donations $1,400.00
United Way/Foundations $0.00
User Fees $0.00
Total $18,125.00

VII. Volunteer Involvement in Extension Programs

Number of Volunteers* Number of Volunteer Hours Known client contacts by volunteers Dollar Value at 25.43
4-H: 19 43 235 $ 1,093.00
Advisory Leadership System: 0 0 0 $ 0.00
Extension Community Association: 0 0 0 $ 0.00
Extension Master Gardener: 44 1,919 3,997 $ 48,800.00
Other: 11 30 10 $ 763.00
Total: 74 1992 4242 $ 50,657.00
* The number of volunteers reflects the overall number of volunteers for multiple events.

VIII. Membership of Advisory Leadership System

Advisory Council
Gwen Brown
Ricky Winebarger
Shannon Ray
Whitney Pierce
Nicole Walker
Betty Onufrank
Ellen Colodney
Fenton Eure, Jr.
Erin Brabble
Louis Nixon
Jack Parker
Joseph Parrish
Jeff Smith
Milton Tynch
Alice Ward
Mike Williams
Debra Phelps
Agriculture
Bill Jordan
Scott Winslow
Joey Byrum
John Layton
Adam Bunch
Fenton Eure Jr.
Mike Parrish
Jeff Smith
Joe Ward
Aquaculture
Aubry Onley, Jr.
Chuck Weirich
Sterling Davenport
Doug Wassum
Gary Sawyer
Craig Perry
Pete Anderson
Harry Daniels
Gary Dillon
Randy Gray
Dale Pridgen
Family and Consumer Science
Erin Brabble
Wanda Stallings
Stephanie Patsel
Alice Ward
Fran Ward
Liza Layton
4-H and Youth
Shannon Ray
Rhonda Cobb
Salina Fueston
Mike Pippins
Jennifer Cobb
Whitney Pierce
Angie Walston
Ricky Winebarger
Master Gardener & Consumer Horticulture
Nancy Dougherty
Jimmy Cochrane
Micki Levine
Linda Kruegel
Brenda Atkins
Carol Billek
Elaine Grosjean
Arlene Mackay
Nancy McGowan
Betty Onufrak
Kay Polizzano
Anne Standing

IX. Staff Membership

Mary Morris
Title: County Extension Director and Extension Agent, Family and Consumer Sciences
Phone: (252) 482-6585
Email: mary_morris@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: To improve the health and wellness of families in Chowan County. Program areas include Nutrition, Food Safety, Food Preservation, Reducing Chronic Disease and Physical Activity Education.

Nettie Baugher
Title: Area Agent, Agriculture - Commercial Horticulture
Phone: (252) 357-1400
Email: nettie_baugher@ncsu.edu

Patty Bowers
Title: EFNEP Educator, Extension Program Assistant
Phone: (252) 482-6585
Email: patty_bowers@ncsu.edu

Denise Bunch
Title: County Extension Administrative Assistant
Phone: (252) 482-6585
Email: denise_bunch@ncsu.edu

Camaryn Byrum
Title: Extension Agent, 4-H Youth Development
Phone: (252) 482-6585
Email: cibyrum@ncsu.edu

Susan Chase
Title: Regional Nutrition Extension Associate - Northeast EFNEP and SNAP-Ed
Phone: (919) 827-2285
Email: susan_chase@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Job Description: Provides programmatic supervision to the EFNEP program in the Northeast District

Candice Christian
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Consumer and Retail Food Safety
Phone: (919) 515-9148
Email: Candice_Christian@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: The overall goal of the Area Specialized Agents (ASAs) in Consumer & Retail Food Safety is to support FCS Agents in delivering timely and evidence-based food safety education and information to stakeholders in North Carolina.

Erin Eure
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Commercial Fruits and Vegetables
Phone: (252) 357-1400
Email: erin_eure@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provides educational opportunities and technical support to commercial fruit and vegetable growers, agents, and industry in northeastern NC.

Steve Gabel
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Aquaculture
Phone: (252) 482-6585
Email: steve_gabel@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Responsible for aquaculture educational programs for the NC NE extension district.

Jared Harrell
Title: Area Agent, Agriculture - Livestock
Phone: (252) 426-5428
Email: jared_harrell@ncsu.edu

Marissa Herchler
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Animal Food Safety (FSMA Programs)
Phone: (919) 515-5396
Email: marissa_herchler@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Marissa is an Area Specialized Agent for animal food safety, with emphasis on the new Food Safety Modernization Act rules, as they apply to feed mills in North Carolina. Please contact Marissa with any FSMA related questions, or PCQI training inquiries.

Lynette Johnston
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Food Safety
Phone: (919) 515-0303
Email: lynette_johnston@ncsu.edu

Danny Lauderdale
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Nursery and Greenhouse, Eastern Region
Phone: (252) 237-0111
Email: danny_lauderdale@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provides programming to commercial ornamental nursery and greenhouse producers in eastern North Carolina.

Matt Leary
Title: Extension Agent, Agriculture
Phone: (252) 482-6585
Email: matt_leary@ncsu.edu

Bill Lord
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Water Resources
Phone: (919) 496-3344
Email: william_lord@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Water quality education and technical assistance

Lori McBryde
Title: Area 4-H Agent, East Region
Phone: (919) 989-5380
Email: lori_mcbryde@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provide support the Eastern 34 Counties of the Northeast and Southeast Districts in 4-H Youth Development.

Margaret Ross
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Poultry
Phone: (252) 670-8254
Email: margaret_ross@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Working with commercial poultry producers to assist in writing nutrient management plans and conducting educational programming.

Katy Shook
Title: Area Agent, Agriculture - Consumer Horticulture
Phone: (252) 482-6585
Email: katy_shook@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Chowan, Gates & Perquimans County Consumer Horticulture Agent & Extension Master Gardener Coordinator

Chip Simmons
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Food Safety
Phone: (919) 414-5632
Email: odsimmon@ncsu.edu

Gail Spiewak
Title: SHIIP Coordinator/County Extension Support Specialist,
Phone: (252) 482-6585
Email: gail_spiewak@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: SHIIP Coordinator for Chowan County Experienced in answering Medicare questions and Medicare Plan D Open Enrollment

Scott Tilley
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Grain
Phone: (252) 793-4428
Email: scott_tilley@ncsu.edu

Mitch Woodward
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Watersheds and Water Quality
Phone: (919) 250-1112
Email: mdwoodwa@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: NC Cooperative Extension's Goals include: - NC's natural resources and environmental quality will be protected, conserved and enhanced. - NC will have profitable, environmentally sustainable plant, animal and food systems. Protecting our environmental resources, particularly drinking water quality, is a top priority in NC. NC Cooperative Extension is a leader in teaching, researching, and accelerating the adoption of effective water quality protection practices.

X. Contact Information

Chowan County Center
730 N Granville, Suite A
Chowan County Agricultural Center
Edenton, NC 27932

Phone: (252) 482-6585
Fax: (252) 482-6590
URL: http://chowan.ces.ncsu.edu