2017 Chowan County Program Impact Report

Approved: February 1, 2018

I. Executive Summary

In 2017 Chowan County Cooperative Extension reached 50,931 people face-to-face. Program objectives included leadership development, volunteerism, school to career pathways, profitable and sustainable agriculture systems, urban and consumer agriculture, safety and security of our food and farm systems, and healthy eating and chronic disease reduction. In addition, the Chowan County Extension Center received $7,000 in outside funding for 2017.

4-H 
The 4-H Youth Development Program provided programming that encouraged exploration of school-to-career opportunities and volunteer readiness. Approximately 10,797 youth participated in a variety of programs focusing on developing essential life skills. Successful programs this year included 4-H Embryology in the schools, the Kids and Cops Program, and 4-H Residential Camp. The 5Kids in partnership with the Edenton Parks and Recreation Department reached 30 youth at D.F. Walker School. This program trained the youth to run in the Glow run 5K race. The Chowan County Livestock show and sale reached 75 youth, 4-Hers learned responsibility, good sportsmanship skills, leadership, and dedication by raising and showing their 4-H project. This program continues each year to teach the 4-Hers about the agriculture industry. 4-H Summer programs include Adventure Camp, Kids & Cops and 4-H Jr. Chef Program. 

EFNEP 
The 4-H Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program partnered with area schools to lead curriculum emphasizing healthy food choices, physical activity and food safety. As a result, EFNEP made a difference for 4,064 Limited Resource Youth Nutrition contacts. Education helps to teach youth healthier ways of eating and being active. When youth take home health information for the adults in the household this helps to reduce health care cost, and chronic diseases in our communities. 100% of EFNEP participants improved dietary intake. 60% of children and youth used safe food handling practices more often or gained knowledge. 92% of youth gained knowledge in better food resource management. Chowan and Perquimans Counties EFNEP program obtained $4000 in funding and support from local efforts. 

Aquaculture 
Accomplishments for the Northeast Extension District Aquaculture Program included working with the North Carolina Aquaculture Association Crawfish Group. Net income gains by producers adopting Extension-recommended best management practices, including those practices related to husbandry, improved planning, marketing, and financial practices $136,625. A fish producer called the ASA-Aquaculture responsible for educational aquaculture programs in NE North Carolina with chronic mortalities in 3 of his fingerling ponds.
The ASA-Aquaculture responded with a site visit to determine the cause. After examining environmental factors, an on-site fish necropsy was performed, confirming the cause of the mortalities as a Columnaris sp. infection. The method of diagnosis was taught to the producer and assistant manager with a method of treatment.
The treatment was implemented the same day as diagnosis and within 24 hours, the mortalities had ceased, saving the producer over $75,000 in potential fingerling loss. The NC aquaculture community is close knit and information is readily shared among producers. An example of this pass-along method of teaching can be exemplified by a previous call for assistance concerning fish mortalities. This producer learned the importance of a microscope for diagnostic purposes and most producers now have microscopes at the farms.
The clinical signs, method of diagnosis, and treatment were taught to the one producer, who has then shared that information with other producers in the industry.

FCS 
Family & Consumer Science programs included Safe Plates, 7 area restaurant owners, managers and food service employees from the Chowan area participated in the 16-hour training and certification test. The certification test is given after the 16-hour course is completed, the test must be administered by a registered proctor. Food Safety programming also included team teaching with Albemarle Regional Health Services Servsafe classes in Pasquotank County. NC Hospitality & Pride training was implemented for the Town of Edenton Employees with a total of 20 participating in 2 scheduled trainings. Ten participated in the “Summer Canning Series" where participants learn proper canning techniques for home food preservation. The Holiday Challenge is an electronic campaign to “Maintain Don’t Gain” through the Holidays. There were 16 Chowan county participants who signed up who weighed in weekly.

SHIIP 
The Chowan County Senior Health Insurance Information Program Coordinator met with 348 Medicare clients in 2017. This is the sixth year the SHIIP Coordinator has been in Chowan County and many beneficiaries have made return visits for help with Medicare concerns including during the Open Enrollment Period. Outreach to get the information throughout the county that the SHIIP Coordinator is located at the Cooperative Extension Agency is a main goal throughout the year. The coordinator participated in Health Fairs and Community Events. SHIIP information was presented and beneficiaries were counseling about Medicare questions and concerns. During Open Enrollment 2017, 189 beneficiaries were served and $367,322 was returned back to the hands of the Chowan County Medicare beneficiaries. 

Horticulture- Consumer 
The Chowan County Consumer Horticulture program resulted in 104 participants improving knowledge, skills and aspirations regarding gardening and landscape practices including plant selection and placement, turf grass management, soil management, growing food, water conservation, water quality preservation and pest management. Through programs like the Albemarle Area Landscape School, Extension Master Gardener, Junior Master Gardener and Gardening in the Albemarle, 99 participants saved more than $24,150 from the use of Extension recommended best management practices in landscapes turf, and gardens. In 2017, 135 local residents of Chowan, Gates & Perquimans County were either certified or re certified as Extension Master Gardener Volunteers by the local Cooperative Extension office. In addition, Extension Master Gardeners contributed more than 1,975 hours of volunteer service – a value of approximately $47,677 to the local county center. 

Agriculture 
The Chowan County Agriculture Program resulted in 23,633 participants increasing their knowledge about best management practices, natural resources and environmental issues through winter production meetings and individual contacts. Chowan farmers used North Carolina Cooperative Extension recommendations for variety selection, seeding rates, use of different modes of action chemicals for grass and weed control. 185 participants increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, and/or skills in best management production practices, pest/insect, disease, weed, wildlife management, financial/farm management tools and practices, alternative agriculture, bioenergy, and value-added enterprises. 569 crop producers in the Northeast adopting best management practices, including those practices related to nutrient management, conservation, production, cultivars, pest management, business management, and marketing which represents to those people and the local economy, $1,748,400.00 in preserved wages.

II. County Background

Chowan County was first established in 1685. Edenton, the county seat and only major town, was incorporated in 1722. The desirable location on the Albemarle Sound and Chowan River made Chowan County the focal point for the Albemarle region, and for a time Edenton served as the capital of the colony. At 233 square miles, Chowan is the smallest county in NC. It is bordered to the north by Gates County, the east by Perquimans County, and the south and west by the Albemarle Sound and Chowan River, respectively.

Chowan County has a population of 14,394. Sixty-two percent of the population is white, 34% is black, and 3.5% are hispanic or of some other ethnicity. There are 3,067 youth between the ages of five and nineteen. The county has 5,967 households with a median household income of $38,759.

Agriculture has long been a primary industry in Chowan County. The production of peanuts, cotton, corn, soybeans, small grains, clary sage, vegetables, nursery crops, and livestock are produced on about 58,146 of the county's 73,000 acres. Agricultural production generates approximately $50 million yearly through farm income and continues to drive the local economy. Historical revenue streams such as boat building, construction, and tourism have suffered under the present economy.

Though growth and development have stalled, property values remain relatively high due to the desirable real estate found in the area. Chowan has become a popular destination for retirees which is reflected in the high percentage of adults 65 and over (23.1%; state average 12.7%). Limited employment opportunities combined with a high cost of living make it more difficult for the local population to remain in their homes or to find affordable health care. The poverty level still remains high at 19.4%

Limited employment opportunities also create hardships for the youth population in Chowan County. With the trend to become competitive in a global marketplace rather than just at the local level, it is now imperative that youth build essential life skills beyond their school environment in order to become more well rounded, prepared individuals for the work force.

Information from our most recent environmental scan combined with feedback from the County Advisory system and state program initiatives aligned with the mission of Cooperative Extension have identified priority issues in several areas including:
•Building youth character, life skills, and leadership development
•Promoting proper nutrition, wellness, and a healthy lifestyle
•Maintaining agricultural profitability through demonstrations with new technology, production methods, and crops/products
•Pesticide safety
•Local Food Production & Consumption through food safety trainings (for commercial and home producers), farm:city relationships, community gardens and farmers markets
•Budget Management through promoting energy efficiency, farm production savings, home production savings and youth saving strategies.

III. Objectives to Address the Cooperative Extension Long Range Plan

North Carolina's plant production systems will become more profitable and sustainable.

Value* Outcome Description
190Number of crop (all plant systems) producers increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, and/or skills as related to: 1. Best management production practices (cultural, nutrient, and genetics) 2. Pest/insect, disease, weed, wildlife management 3. Financial/Farm management tools and practices (business, marketing, government policy, human resources) 4. Alternative agriculture, bioenergy, and value-added enterprises
3Number of Extension initiated and controlled County demonstration test sites (new required for GLF/PSI reporting)
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

North Carolina's animal production systems will become more profitable and sustainable.

Value* Outcome Description
107Number of animal producers increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, and/or skills as related to: 1. Best management production practices (cultural, nutrient, and genetics) 2. Pest/insect, disease, weed, wildlife management 3. Financial/Farm management tools and practices (business, marketing, government policy, human resources) 4. Alternative agriculture, bioenergy, and value-added enterprises
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
105Number of animal producers adopting Extension-recommended best management practices, including those practices related to husbandry, improved planning, marketing, and financial practices
262017Net income gains by producers adopting Extension-recommended best management practices, including those practices related to husbandry, improved planning, marketing, and financial practices
26Number of animal producers implementing Extension-recommended best management practices for animal waste management
0Tons of livestock organic by-products utilized (nutrients from waste, compost, etc)
0Net income gain by using livestock organic by-products instead of synthetic fertilizers
21Number of waste management certifications gained or maintained due to Extension education efforts
9Number of acres where Extension-recommended waste analysis was used for proper land application
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Producers will increase sales of food locally to more agriculturally aware consumers through market development, producer and consumer education, and new farmer and infrastructure support.

Value* Outcome Description
20Number of individuals who learn how to prepare local foods, including through use of home food preservation techniques.
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
20Number of youth who grow food in school gardens.
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Agricultural producers, workers, food handlers and consumers will adopt safer food and agricultural production, handling, and distribution practices that reduce workplace and home injuries/illnesses, enhance food security, and increase the quality and safety of food that North Carolinians prepare and consume.

Value* Outcome Description
2Number of commercial/public operators trained
16Number of pesticide application credit hours provided
10Number of food service employees receiving ServSafe certification
5TOTAL number of food handlers receiving food safety training and education in safe food handling practices (new required data for federal reporting)
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
20Number of participants implementing ServSafe
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Individuals and groups will acquire leadership and decision making capacities needed to guide and actively participate in local and state organizations.

Value* Outcome Description
3Number of adults increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
3Number of adults assuming new/expanded leadership roles in the community
39Number of youth increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
39Number of youth assuming new/expanded leadership roles in the community
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
3Number of adults increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
1Number of adults assuming new/expanded leadership roles in the community
39Number of youth increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
39Number of youth assuming new/expanded leadership roles in the community
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Youth and adults will address community issues and/or challenges through volunteerism.

Value* Outcome Description
20Number of adult participants acquiring the skills needed to serve as a volunteer
16Number of youth participants reporting aspirations to serve in new or expanded volunteer roles in community
23Number of adult participants reporting aspirations to serve in new or expanded volunteer roles in community
4Number of hours adult volunteer training conducted
4Number new volunteers recruited
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
462Increased number of hours contributed by trained adult volunteers
13Number of adult volunteers serving in new or expanded roles within Extension
9Number of adult volunteers serving in new or expanded roles beyond Extension, including community boards and task forces
7Number of adult volunteers recruiting and/or training new volunteers
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Community members, organizations and local government will engage in collaborative dialog and decision-making to build economically, socially and environmentally resilient communities. This will be done through inclusive engagement, partnership building, and/or community planning.

Adults and youth will apply financial management practices to increase their economic security, which include to: meet basic necessities, increase savings, reduce debt, and build long-term assets.

Value* Outcome Description
348Number of people gaining knowledge and/or skills to increase family economic security (such as; how to access: SNAP benefits, SHIIP Medicare Part D; food cost management, cost comparison skills, shop for reverse mortgages, select long term care insurance, etc.)
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Futures that Work: School to Career Pathways

Value* Outcome Description
8Number of teachers trained in 4-H STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) curriculum
170Number of youth (students) increasing knowledge in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math)
85Total number of female participants in STEM program
20Number of high school age youth (students) participating as members of 4-H clubs
20Number of youth (students) increasing knowledge of career/employability skills
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
8Number of teachers using 4-H STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) curriculum in their classrooms
170Number of youth (students) gaining knowledge in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math)
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

North Carolinians will make decisions and adopt practices that implement effective resource protection and conservation.

Youth and adult program participants will make healthy food choices, achieve the recommended amount of physical activity and reduce risk factors for chronic diseases.

Value* Impact Description
30Number of adults increasing their fruit and vegetables consumption
75Number of youth increasing their fruit and vegetable consumption
75Number of participants increasing their physical activity
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

IV. Other Objectives

Food Insecurity

V. Number of Contacts Made by Extension

Type of ContactNumber
Face-to-face* 21,485
Non face-to-face** 29,446
Total by Extension staff in 2017 50,931
* Face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make directly with individuals through one-on-one visits, meetings, and other activities where staff members work directly with individuals.
** Non face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make indirectly with individuals by telephone, email, newsletters, news articles, radio, television, and other means.

VI. Designated Grants Received by Extension

Type of GrantAmount
Contracts/Grants $46,000.00
Gifts/Donations $1,000.00
In-Kind Grants/Donations $0.00
United Way/Foundations $0.00
User Fees $0.00
Total $47,000.00

VII. Volunteer Involvement in Extension Programs

Number of Volunteers* Number of Volunteer Hours Known client contacts by volunteers Dollar Value at 24.69
4-H: 9 241 62 $ 5,950.00
Advisory Leadership System: 0 0 0 $ 0.00
Extension Community Association: 43 10 43 $ 247.00
Extension Master Gardener: 135 1,975 4,504 $ 48,763.00
Other: 110 636 1,914 $ 15,703.00
Total: 297 2862 6523 $ 70,663.00
* The number of volunteers reflects the overall number of volunteers for multiple events.

VIII. Membership of Advisory Leadership System

Advisory Council
Gwen Brown
Ricky Winebarger
Shannon Ray
Whitney Pierce
Nicole Walker
Betty Onufrank
Ellen Colodney
Fenton Eure, Jr.
Erin Brabble
Louis Nixon
Jack Parker
Joseph Parrish
Jeff Smith
Milton Tynch
Alice Ward
Mike Williams
Agriculture
Bill Jordan
Scott Winslow
Joey Byrum
John Layton
Ed Jackson
Adam Bunch
Fent Eure Jr.
Mike Parrish
Jeff Smith
Joe Ward
Aquaculture
Jeremy McCargo
Aubrey Onley, Jr.
Charles Weirich
Sterling Davenport
Doug Wassum
Gary Sawyer
Craig Perry
Stephen Jackson
Pete Anderson
Harry Daniels
Rob Mayo

Family and Consumer Science
Erin Brabble
Wanda Stallings
Stephanie Patsel
Alice Ward
Fran Ward
Liza White
4-H and Youth
Shannon Ray
Rhonda Cobb
Salina Fueston
Mike Pippins
Jennifer Cobb
Whitney Pierce
Angie Walston
Ricky Winebarger
Master Gardener & Consumer Horticulture
Mickie Levine
Nancy Dougherty
Linda Kruegal
Carol Billek
Brenda Atkins
Lee Kapleau
Jean Oaks
Arlene Mackay
Edna Harvey
Dotti Morrow
Betty Onufrak

IX. Staff Membership

Mary Morris
Title: County Extension Director & Extension Agent Family & Consumer Sciences
Phone: (252) 482-6585
Email: mary_morris@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: To improve the health and wellness of families in Chowan County. Program areas include Nutrition, Food Safety, Food Preservation, Reducing Chronic Disease and Physical Activity Education.

Nettie Baugher
Title: Area Agent, Agriculture - Commercial Horticulture
Phone: (252) 357-1400
Email: nettie_baugher@ncsu.edu

Patty Bowers
Title: EFNEP Educator, Extension Program Assistant
Phone: (252) 482-6585
Email: patty_bowers@ncsu.edu

Denise Bunch
Title: County Extension Administrative Assistant
Phone: (252) 482-6585
Email: denise_bunch@ncsu.edu

Camaryn Byrum
Title: Extension Agent, 4-H Youth Development
Phone: (252) 482-6585
Email: cibyrum@ncsu.edu

Susan Chase
Title: Regional Nutrition Extension Associate - Northeast EFNEP and SNAP-Ed
Phone: (919) 827-2285
Email: susan_chase@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Job Description: Provides programmatic supervision to the EFNEP program in the Northeast District

Candice Christian
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Consumer and Retail Food Safety
Phone: (919) 515-9148
Email: Candice_Christian@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: The overall goal of the Area Specialized Agents (ASAs) in Consumer & Retail Food Safety is to support FCS Agents in delivering timely and evidence-based food safety education and information to stakeholders in North Carolina.

Erin Eure
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Commercial Fruits & Vegetables
Phone: (252) 357-1400
Email: erin_eure@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provides educational opportunities and technical support to commercial fruit and vegetable growers, agents, and industry in northeastern NC.

Steve Gabel
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Aquaculture
Phone: (252) 482-6585
Email: steve_gabel@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Responsible for aquaculture educational programs for the NC NE extension district.

Jared Harrell
Title: Area Agent, Agriculture - Livestock
Phone: (252) 426-5428
Email: jared_harrell@ncsu.edu

Marissa Herchler
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Animal Food Safety (FSMA Programs)
Phone: (919) 515-5396
Email: marissa_herchler@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Marissa is an Area Specialized Agent for animal food safety, with emphasis on the new Food Safety Modernization Act rules, as they apply to feed mills in North Carolina. Please contact Marissa with any FSMA related questions, or PCQI training inquiries.

Lynette Johnston
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Food Safety
Phone: (919) 515-0303
Email: lynette_johnston@ncsu.edu

Danny Lauderdale
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Nursery and Greenhouse, Eastern Region
Phone: (252) 237-0111
Email: danny_lauderdale@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provides programming to commercial ornamental nursery and greenhouse producers in eastern North Carolina.

Matt Leary
Title: Extension Agent, Agriculture
Phone: (252) 482-6585
Email: matt_leary@ncsu.edu

Bill Lord
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Water Resources
Phone: (919) 496-3344
Email: william_lord@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Water quality education and technical assistance

Margaret Ross
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Poultry
Phone: (252) 670-8254
Email: margaret_ross@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Working with commercial poultry producers to assist in writing nutrient management plans and conducting educational programming.

Katy Shook
Title: Area Agent, Agriculture - Consumer Horticulture
Phone: (252) 482-6585
Email: katy_shook@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Chowan, Gates & Perquimans County Consumer Horticulture Agent & Extension Master Gardener Coordinator

Chip Simmons
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Food Safety
Phone: (919) 414-5632
Email: odsimmon@ncsu.edu

Gail Spiewak
Title: SHIIP Coordinator/County Extension Support Specialist,
Phone: (252) 482-6585
Email: gail_spiewak@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: SHIIP Coordinator for Chowan County Experienced in answering Medicare questions and Medicare Plan D Open Enrollment

Scott Tilley
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Field Crops
Phone: (252) 793-4428
Email: scott_tilley@ncsu.edu

Mitch Woodward
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Watersheds and Water Quality
Phone: (919) 250-1112
Email: mdwoodwa@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: NC Cooperative Extension's Goals include: - NC's natural resources and environmental quality will be protected, conserved and enhanced. - NC will have profitable, environmentally sustainable plant, animal and food systems. Protecting our environmental resources, particularly drinking water quality, is a top priority in NC. NC Cooperative Extension is a leader in teaching, researching, and accelerating the adoption of effective water quality protection practices.

X. Contact Information

Chowan County Center
730 N Granville, Suite A
Chowan County Agricultural Center
Edenton, NC 27932

Phone: (252) 482-6585
Fax: (252) 482-6590
URL: http://chowan.ces.ncsu.edu