2019 Cumberland County Program Impact Report

Approved: January 21, 2020

I. Executive Summary

In 2019, Cumberland County Cooperative Extension staff provided educational programs and services to over 19,756 citizens through classes, workshops, tours and activities. In addition, 185,320 citizens were indirectly contacted through a combination of exhibits, telephone calls, emails, and direct mailings. Cooperative Extension programs in the county were enhanced through the involvement of volunteers who contributed 17,437 hours to Extension programs with a dollar value of $443,423.

The Cumberland County Extension Master Gardener Volunteers contributed 11,715 hours of volunteer service (3rd in the state) and recorded 3,244 hours of education (2nd in the state).  Additionally, they reached an estimated 13,656 citizens through programs like the Master Gardener Hotline, Plant Sale, Gardening Symposium, and multiple gardening events. The volunteers routinely published gardening articles in the Fayetteville Observer, established an expansive new perennial garden at the Cape Fear Botanical Garden and a therapeutic garden at the NC State Veterans Home. The Extension Master Gardener Volunteer training course enrolled 24 students, which was the largest class to date with 18 of the students already completing their service hours to become a certified Extension Master Gardener.
 
Feeling the effects of Hurricane Florence well into 2019, the 60 farmers that were assisted by the Cumberland County office received aid from the Hurricane Agriculture Disaster Assistance Program.  These funds helped farmers prepare for the new growing season in 2019. During 2019 over 200 farmers attended regional cotton and tobacco production meetings. Additionally, 40 farmers attended an Industrial Hemp production meeting at the Cumberland County office to learn more about this emerging crop. Forty-two farmers who apply restricted use pesticides completed a Respirator Fit training session ensuring their overall safety. Two pesticide applicator schools and three pesticide license exams were held in Cumberland County with 86 pesticide applicators receiving their initial pesticide applicator license and/or added specialty categories to their current license. Several pesticide continuing education programs were conducted, in which 141 applicators participated, earning over 280 hours of pesticide continuing education credits.

In continuing our partnership with Fort Bragg, a total of 26 Civil Affairs soldiers were trained on basic livestock production, vegetable production, and crop production, and 22 medics gained hands-on experience with proper livestock handling. In partnership with the NC State Agricultural Institute, we provided agricultural training sessions for 86 soldiers transitioning out of the military. In partnership with Cumberland County Animal Control, Extension assisted officers with multiple farm visits to help educate citizens with animal concerns. Cumberland County joined forces with the NC Agromedicine Institute to provide a workshop for minority, veteran, and disadvantaged farmers discussing current resources available to them.  Extension also partnered with Cumberland County Schools to provide 136 students with certifications in Beef Quality Assurance, Pork Quality Assurance, and FAMACHA trainings to students in animal science classes. A total of 70 youth from 13 counties participated in the livestock shows at the Cumberland County Fair. By participating in showing livestock, youth learned communication skills, work ethic, responsibility, and sportsmanship

The Family and Consumer Sciences “FCS” program reached over 8,825 citizens through programs and indirect contacts. The Steps to Health program made 1,210 educational contacts. Ninety-four percent of the parents reported their child consumed more water, and 88% of parents observed their child eating more fruits and vegetables. FCS partnered with the Cumberland County Department of Social Services Foster Care program to provide hands-on cooking for youth transitioning out of foster care. Fifty-four educational contacts were made and 94% of the youth indicated they would prepare the recipes again. FCS continued to work with county wellness and made 84 contacts teaching county employees how to prepare healthy meals. Ninety-five percent indicated they prepare these recipes at home. In addition, 75 contacts were made teaching food safety and nutrition through the Better Living Series.

During 2019, over 671 youth engaged in 4-H programming. Military youth participated in one of the five youth sites that offer afterschool and summer programming on Ft. Bragg.  Youth in the county participated in one of ten community-based and special interest clubs, 15 summer fun programs, and other enrichment opportunities.  Over 50 youth from Cumberland County competed on county, district, state, and national levels in the areas of project record books, public speaking, target sports, and equine studies. The Junior Master Gardener Camp hosted 40 children (ages 5-14) over a two-week period where campers gained valuable knowledge through a variety of agricultural experiences. Cumberland County participated in a dairy curriculum pilot project with NCSU, provided Health Rocks to Fayetteville Cumberland Parks and Recreation summer programs, provided training to five teachers on the Integrated Pest Management (IPM) curricula that reached 60 kids.  4-H volunteers contributed over 1500 hours to the success of our young people.

During the 2019 Cumberland County Fair, Cooperative Extension staff created a 900 square foot agricultural exhibit that over 24,000 people visited and increased their knowledge and understanding of the dairy industry. The exhibit was so successful that it was awarded the prestigious “Got to Be NC” Agricultural Commissioner Award by the North Carolina Association of Agricultural Fairs.

II. County Background

With a population of more than 327,000, Cumberland County is the fifth largest county in North Carolina and has one of the most diverse populations in the state. There are nine municipalities in the county: Fayetteville, Spring Lake, Hope Mills, Stedman, Wade, Godwin, Falcon, Linden, and Eastover. The City of Fayetteville is the largest municipality and serves as the county seat. Fayetteville has a population of more than 208,000, making it the sixth largest municipality in the state. Cumberland County is also proud to be the home of Fort Bragg and its more than 60,000 military members and their families.

Geographically, Cumberland County spans approximately 661 square miles. The Cape Fear River, one of the state’s major waterways, runs through the county and is a natural treasure providing drinking water for hundreds of thousands of people, as well as recreational opportunities and a wildlife habitat. According to the NC Department of Agriculture, the county's agricultural impact is over $92,000,000. The county has over 389 farms with 83% being classified as small family farms. The county has a viable and diverse agricultural industry, producing poultry, swine, soybeans, corn, cotton, peanuts, sweet potatoes and tobacco. Farms and forests cover over half of the county, providing economic, ecological and social benefits to the community at large.

In addition, Cumberland County has the 4th largest school district in NC with an enrollment of over 51,000 students in 86 schools which indicates the potential for a strong 4-H and Youth Development program in the county.

III. Objectives to Address the Cooperative Extension Long Range Plan

Our family and consumer sciences programs improve the well-being of individuals, families, and communities.

Our plant production programs improve production, profitability, and sustainability of the agriculture sector.

Value* Outcome Description
89Number of producers who gain skills or knowledge to increase production for local markets.
10Number of producers who improve local food marketing skills or knowledge.
188Number of pesticide applicators receiving continuing education credits
17Number of pesticide credit hours provided
155Number of crop (all plant systems) producers increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, and/or skills as related to: 1. Best management production practices (cultural, nutrient, and genetics) 2. Pest/insect, disease, weed, wildlife management 3. Financial/Farm management tools and practices (business, marketing, government policy, human resources) 4. Alternative agriculture, bioenergy, and value-added enterprises
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
10Number of producers who diversified their marketing strategies into local markets (direct, intermediated/food service, institutional).
35Number of producers (and other members of the local food supply chain) who have increased revenue
30Number of farms certified as a Certified Safe Farm
12Number of new farms (beginning farmers) selling into local markets for local consumption (in this reporting period)
60Number of farmers, employees or family members adopting regular use of appropriate PPE following AgriSafe or Certified Safe Farm participation
60Number of participants that have adopted farm safety practices
10000Number of acres in conservation tillage or other Best Management Practice
60Number of crop (all plant systems) producers adopting best management practices, including those practices related to nutrient management, conservation, production, cultivars, pest management (weeds, diseases, insects), business management, and marketing
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Our animal production programs improve production, profitability, and sustainability of the agriculture sector.

Value* Outcome Description
3Number of producers who improve local food marketing skills or knowledge.
3Number of producers who gain skills or knowledge to increase production for local markets.
2Number of animal producers who increased knowledge of farm business management, business planning, financial management, marketing, or estate planning.
31Number of animal producers who learned how to develop a management plan (i.e. grazing plan, feeding plan, drought plan, business plan, disaster plan, etc.)
17Number of producers who increased knowledge of pasture/forage management practices (field improvement, herbicide management, grazing season extension, weed control, forage quality, haylage production, nitrate testing, etc.)
30Number of producers who increased knowledge of nutrition, ration balancing, mineral supplements, breeding, and reproduction
4Number of producers who increased knowledge of the strategies to promote animal health and welfare and reduce the potential for infectious diseases through proper use of vaccines, biosecurity, detection and identification of common diseases, appropriate use of animal medications, and mitigation of antimicrobial resistance transmission
3Number of producers who increased knowledge of animal waste management practices
3Number of animal waste management credits earned through Extension programs
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
4Number of producers who diversified their marketing strategies into local markets (direct, intermediated/food service, institutional).
3Number of new farms (beginning farmers) selling into local markets for local consumption (in this reporting period)
4Number of producers (and other members of the local food supply chain) who have increased revenue
9Number of participants that have adopted farm safety practices
2Number of producers adopting extension-recommended practices related to planning, marketing, and financial management
3Number of producers implementing Extension-recommended best management practices for animal waste management
300Number of acres where Extension-recommended nutrient applications were used
3Number of producers who adopted Extension-recommended best management practices and production changes related to quality assurance (vaccinations, castration, culling techniques, etc.)
2Number of producers who adopted Extension-recommended best management practices and production changes related to genetic improvement (AI, heifer/bull selection)
3Number of producers who adopted Extension-recommended best management practices and production changes related to nutrition (mineral, feed rations)
19Number of producers who adopted Extension-recommended best management practices and production changes related to internal parasite management (fecals, deworming)
11Number of producers who adopted Extension-recommended best management practices related to pasture management
6Number of producers who adopted Extension-recommended best management practices and production changes related to nutrition, ration balancing, mineral supplement, breeding, and reproduction
2Number of producers using improved biosecurity practices
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Our community development programs build strong and thriving communities.

Value* Outcome Description
17797Number of participants who improved knowledge of local food and agricultural systems
76Number of adult participants acquiring the skills needed to serve as a volunteer
13Number of participants acquiring knowledge and skills to convene and lead inclusive groups
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Our 4-H youth development programs grow the skills young people need to succeed in life and career.

Value* Outcome Description
45Number of teachers trained in 4-H STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) curriculum
450Number of youth (students) increasing knowledge in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math)
202Total number of female participants in STEM program
27Number of high school age youth (students) participating as members of 4-H clubs
406Number of youth increasing knowledge of life skills
20948Number of children/youth who improved knowledge of local food and agricultural systems.
416Number of youth increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
16Number of youth demonstrating increased knowledge of natural resources and environmental issues
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
45Number of teachers using 4-H STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) curriculum in their classrooms
81Number of youth (students) gaining career / employability skills
310Number of youth using effective life skills
277Number of youth increasing their physical activity
40Number of youth volunteers serving in new or expanded roles within Extension
5Number of youth volunteers serving in new or expanded roles beyond Extension, including community boards and task forces
39Number of youth assuming new/expanded leadership roles in the community
893Number of youth increasing their fruit and vegetable consumption
57Number of youth who grow food in school gardens.
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Our natural resource and environmental programs conserve our precious natural resources and maintain a clean and healthy environment.

Our consumer horticulture programs teach families and communities about environmentally friendly methods for gardening and controlling pests.

Value* Outcome Description
1940Number of individuals who gain knowledge or acquire skills related to vegetable/fruit gardening
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
1250Number of individuals who grow food in community gardens.
215Number of individuals who begin home food production by starting a vegetable and/or fruit garden
125Number of individuals who begin home food production by starting to raise backyard livestock.
3550Number of participants who use extension-recommended best management practices in landscapes, turf, and gardens, including pest (insect, weed, disease, wildlife) and soil management
985Number of participants selecting appropriate landscape plants (adapted, drought tolerant, appropriate size, etc.)
350Number of participants growing food for home consumption
80Number of participants adopting composting
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Our food safety and nutrition programs create a safer and more sustainable food supply and improve the health and nutrition of individuals, families, and our communities.

Value* Outcome Description
73Number of participants who increase their knowledge of safe home food handling, preservation, or preparation practices
107Number of individuals who learn how to prepare local foods, including through use of home food preservation techniques.
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
111Number of adults increasing their fruit and vegetables consumption
231Number of participants increasing their physical activity
62Number of participants who consume less sodium in their diet
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

IV. Number of Contacts Made by Extension

Type of ContactNumber
Face-to-face* 19,756
Non face-to-face** 185,320
Total by Extension staff in 2019 205,076
* Face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make directly with individuals through one-on-one visits, meetings, and other activities where staff members work directly with individuals.
** Non face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make indirectly with individuals by telephone, email, newsletters, news articles, radio, television, and other means.

V. Designated Grants Received by Extension

Type of GrantAmount
Contracts/Grants $58.27
Gifts/Donations $12,984.60
In-Kind Grants/Donations $156.00
United Way/Foundations $316.30
User Fees $15,018.00
Total $28,533.17

VI. Volunteer Involvement in Extension Programs

Number of Volunteers* Number of Volunteer Hours Known client contacts by volunteers Dollar Value at 25.43
4-H 786 4184 9267 $ 106,399.00
Advisory Leadership System 25 13 1 $ 331.00
Extension Community Association 204 325 88 $ 8,265.00
Extension Master Gardener 839 12679 13656 $ 322,427.00
Other: Agriculture 14 236 3057 $ 6,001.00
Total: 1868 17437 26069 $ 443,423.00
* The number of volunteers reflects the overall number of volunteers for multiple events.

VII. Membership of Advisory Leadership System

Advisory Council
Cathy Mansfield
Thad Banks
Amy Cannon
Willie Geddie
Eleanore Getz
Daryle Nobles
Jack Dewar
Chip Lucas
Tracy Jackson
Carson Phipps
Paul Maguire
Pam Pollard
Kay Bullard
Walter Wood
Livestock
Wayne Collier, Jr.
Johnny Carter
Tara King
Kevin West
Michael Herndon
Christy Burns
Bruce Hammill
Craig Tyson
Family and Consumer Sciences
Kris Caison
Barbara Simmons
Dee Boyer
Peggy Middleton
Consuela Norwood
Kay Bullard
4-H Resource Development (Cumberland County 4-H Foundation)
Debby Lewis
Eleanore Getz
Willie Geddie
Wayne Collier, Jr.
Sherrill Jernigan
Katie West
Crystal Glover
Tyshica Smith
Mable Murray
Jolene Kreiling
Beekeeping
Kenny Jones
Paul Johnson
Conrad Ward
Connie Blacketer
Jim Fleming
4-H & Youth
Mable Murray
Deborah Bruton
Eleanore Getz
Alfreda Williams
CeSea Lawson
Alisha Horton
Cheryl Brunelle
Heather White
Angela Ray
Herminia Gomez
Patricia Lindsey
Troy Lindsey
Claudia McCauley
Consumer & Commercial Horticultural
Charles Allen
Vic Blake
Shelia Spence
Maxton Bunce
Melissa Rodriguez
Vince Evans
Pat Hurley
Genette Womack
Amy Farley
Curtis Vaughan
Bob Fox
Lee Williams
Jack Dewar
Debby Nasekos
Cheryl Garrett
Walter Wood
Leslie Kiewra
Bob Fox
Farm Advisory Committee
Vance Tyson
Diane Wheatley
Kevin West
Clifton McNeill, Jr.
Sherrill Jernigan
Tracy Gardner
Joe Gillis
Ryan Kennedy

VIII. Staff Membership

Lisa Childers
Title: County Extension Director
Phone: (910) 321-6880
Email: lisa_childers@ncsu.edu

Kenny Bailey
Title: Extension Agent, Agriculture
Phone: (910) 321-6871
Email: kenneth_bailey@ncsu.edu

Jenny Carleo
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Grain Crops
Phone: (704) 873-0507
Email: jscarleo@ncsu.edu

Marti Day
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Dairy
Phone: (919) 542-8202
Email: marti_day@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Responsible for educational programs for dairy farmers, youth with an interest in dairy projects and the general public with an interest in dairy foods and the dairy industry.

Jessica Drake
Title: Extension Agent, 4-H Youth Development
Phone: (910) 321-6867
Email: jessica_drake@ncsu.edu

Jeanie Edwards
Title: Administrative Support Specialist, 4-H Youth Development
Phone: (910) 321-6864
Email: jeanie_edwards@ncsu.edu

Martina Fortune
Title: 4-H Program Assistant, 4-H Youth Development - Military Clubs
Phone: (910) 321-6868
Email: mcfortun@ncsu.edu

Richard Goforth
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Poultry
Phone: (910) 893-7530
Email: richard_goforth@ncsu.edu

Marissa Herchler
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Animal Food Safety (FSMA Programs)
Phone: (919) 515-5396
Email: marissa_herchler@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Marissa is an Area Specialized Agent for animal food safety, with emphasis on the new Food Safety Modernization Act rules, as they apply to feed mills in North Carolina. Please contact Marissa with any FSMA related questions, or PCQI training inquiries.

Susan Johnson
Title: Administrative Coordinator, FCS, Urban Horticulture. Livestock Support
Phone: (910) 321-6405
Email: susan_johnson@ncsu.edu

Lynette Johnston
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Food Safety
Phone: (919) 515-0303
Email: lynette_johnston@ncsu.edu

Peggie Lewis Joyce
Title: Area 4-H Agent - Central Region
Phone: (336) 242-2080
Email: peggie_lewis@ncsu.edu

Liz Lahti
Title: Area Agent, Agriculture - Livestock
Phone: (910) 321-6862
Email: liz_lahti@ncsu.edu

Colby Lambert
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Forestry
Phone: (910) 814-6041
Email: colby_lambert@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provides educational opportunities and technical support to forest landowners, agents, and forest industry in eastern North Carolina.

Danny Lauderdale
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Ornamental Nursery and Greenhouse, Eastern Region
Phone: (252) 237-0111
Email: danny_lauderdale@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provides programming to commercial ornamental nursery and greenhouse producers in eastern North Carolina.

Alyssa McMillan
Title: Administrative Support Specialist
Phone: (910) 321-6860
Email: ammcmil4@ncsu.edu

Ashley Robbins
Title: Area Specialized Agent - Dairy
Phone: (919) 542-8203
Email: ashley_robbins@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Marti Day and I are the Area Specialized Dairy Agents - the county-based arm of the Cooperative Extension Dairy Team. We are out here in the counties to help you set and reach your farm, family and business goals. We have collaborative expertise in the areas of Waste Management, Udder Health, Cow Comfort, Nutrition and Forage Management with specialties in (Ashley)Reproduction, Records Management, Animal Health and (Marti)Alternative Markets, Organic Dairy, Grazing Management, and On-farm Processing. We hope to provide comprehensive educational programs for our farmers, consumers and youth for every county across the state. We are here for you by phone, email or text and look forward to working with you!

Chip Simmons
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Food Safety
Phone: (919) 414-5632
Email: odsimmon@ncsu.edu

Allan Thornton
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Commercial Vegetables and Fruits
Phone: (910) 592-7161
Email: allan_thornton@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Vegetable Extension Specialist. Conducts Extension and applied research programs for commercial vegetable and fruit growers and agents in eastern North Carolina.

Candy Underwood
Title: Extension Agent, Family and Consumer Sciences
Phone: (910) 321-6869
Email: candy_underwood@ncsu.edu

Jason Weathington
Title: Extension Agent, Agriculture - Urban Horticulture
Phone: (910) 321-6870
Email: jason_weathington@ncsu.edu

Mitch Woodward
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Watersheds and Water Quality
Phone: (919) 414-3873
Email: mdwoodwa@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: NC Cooperative Extension's Goals include: - NC's natural resources and environmental quality will be protected, conserved and enhanced. - NC will have profitable, environmentally sustainable plant, animal and food systems. Protecting our environmental resources, particularly drinking water quality, is a top priority in NC. NC Cooperative Extension is a leader in teaching, researching, and accelerating the adoption of effective water quality protection practices.

IX. Contact Information

Cumberland County Center
301 E Mountain Dr
Fayetteville, NC 28306

Phone: (910) 321-6860
Fax: (910) 321-6883
URL: http://cumberland.ces.ncsu.edu