2018 Cumberland County Program Impact Report

Approved: January 24, 2019

I. Executive Summary

In 2018, Cumberland County Cooperative Extension staff provided educational programs and services to over 21,100 citizens through classes, workshops, tours and activities. In addition, 90,676 citizens were indirectly contacted through a combination of exhibits, telephone calls, emails, and direct mailings. Cooperative Extension programs in the county were enhanced through the involvement of volunteers who contributed 17,249 hours to Extension programs with a dollar value of $425,878.

The Cumberland County Extension Master Gardener Volunteer program ranks 3rd in the state in volunteer hours and 1st in the state in volunteer hours per capita. Ninety-one members contributed over 10,939 volunteer hours (the most ever recorded in Cumberland County), and reported over 5,600 contacts. The Master Gardener membership increased by 20% with the addition of 21 new members and 22 prospective members have committed to participate in the 2019 education training course. The volunteers provided programs for garden clubs, served as garden educators, docents, and mentors in a number of Fayetteville gardens to include Second Harvest Food Bank of Southeastern NC, Warrior Transition Battalion on Ft. Bragg military base, Cape Fear Botanical Garden, etc. Lastly, more than 20 Master Gardener volunteers helped orchestrate two week-long summer camps for the Cumberland County Junior Master Gardener Program. A total of 40 youth participants increased their agricultural knowledge by visiting farms, gardens, museums and greenhouses.

During 2018, over 250 growers and consultants participated in regional and local production and commodity meetings. In-county research and test plot demonstrations were held for local growers to assist them in making production decisions for the upcoming growing season. This included a wheat variety and herbicide demonstration and a soybean research test plot to study the effect of emergence timing on yield potential.

Due to the agricultural devastation caused by Hurricanes Florence and Michael, Cumberland County Extension assisted the North Carolina Department of Agriculture with enrolling 60 farmers, which is over half of the number enrolled, into the Hurricane Agriculture Disaster Assistance Program. Pesticide training was provided to over 343 applicators who received a total of 520 hours of training.

In continuing our partnership with Fort Bragg, a total of 37 Civil Affairs soldiers were trained on basic livestock production, vegetable production and crop production. In partnership with Cumberland County Animal Control, Extension provided two trainings for Animal Control officers on safe and proper handling techniques for horses and livestock. Cumberland County joined forces with the Cape Fear Botanical Garden to introduce adults from ServiceSource, a nonprofit organization that supports people with disabilities, to chickens and how to handle and raise them. Extension also partnered with Cumberland County Schools to provide Beef Quality Assurance and Pork Quality Assurance certification trainings to students in animal science classes.

4-H enrolled over 670 youth into the 4-H program and an additional 300 students from public and private institutions participated in in-school enrichment programs. Over 435 military youth participated in 32 clubs offered on base at Fort Bragg. 4-H youth in Cumberland County participated in community and special interest clubs, 27 summer fun programs and enrichment opportunities. Youth in each club were given the opportunity to give back to their community throughout the year. Over 42 4-H youth participated in county-wide volunteer opportunities which included: creating 100 quick release paracord bracelets for Operation Gratitude, creating greeting cards for Meals on Wheels, collecting items for a local food pantries, and making approximately 500 dog toys for the county animal shelter.

The Family and Consumer Sciences “FCS” program reached over 7,865 citizens through programs and technical assistance. The Steps to Health program made 1,247 educational contacts. Ninety-eight percent of the parents observed their child’s willingness to taste fruit, 95% observed their child’s willingness to taste vegetables, and 80% of parents reported their child consumed more water. FCS continued to work with county wellness and made 38 contacts teaching county employees how to prepare healthy meals. One hundred percent indicated they prepare these recipes at home. In addition, 249 contacts were made teaching food safety, nutrition and grocery savings through the Better Living Series.

During the 2018 Cumberland County Fair, Cooperative Extension staff created a 1600 square foot agricultural exhibit that over 25,000 people visited and increased their knowledge on understanding where and how food is grown. The exhibit was so successful that it was awarded the prestigious Innovation Award at the annual convention of the North Carolina Association of Agricultural Fairs.

II. County Background

With a population of more than 327,000, Cumberland County is the fifth largest county in North Carolina and has one of the most diverse populations in the state. There are nine municipalities in the county: Fayetteville, Spring Lake, Hope Mills, Stedman, Wade, Godwin, Falcon, Linden, and Eastover. The City of Fayetteville is the largest municipality and serves as the county seat. Fayetteville has a population of more than 208,000, making it the sixth largest municipality in the state. Cumberland County is also proud to be the home of Fort Bragg and its more than 60,000 military members and their families.

Geographically, Cumberland County spans approximately 661 square miles. The Cape Fear River, one of the state’s major waterways, runs through the county and is a natural treasure providing drinking water for hundreds of thousands of people, as well as recreational opportunities and a wildlife habitat. According to the NC Department of Agriculture, the county's agricultural impact is over $100,000,000. The county has over 389 farms with 83% being classified as small family farms. The county has a viable and diverse agricultural industry, producing poultry, swine, soybeans, corn, cotton, and tobacco. Farms and forests cover over half of the county, providing economic, ecological and social benefits to the community at large.

In addition, Cumberland County has the 4th largest school district in NC with an enrollment of over 51,000 students in 86 schools which indicates the potential for a strong 4-H and Youth Development program in the county.

III. Objectives to Address the Cooperative Extension Long Range Plan

North Carolina's plant production systems will become more profitable and sustainable.

Value* Outcome Description
186Number of crop (all plant systems) producers increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, and/or skills as related to: 1. Best management production practices (cultural, nutrient, and genetics) 2. Pest/insect, disease, weed, wildlife management 3. Financial/Farm management tools and practices (business, marketing, government policy, human resources) 4. Alternative agriculture, bioenergy, and value-added enterprises
2Number of Extension initiated and controlled County demonstration test sites (new required for GLF/PSI reporting)
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
138Number of crop (all plant systems) producers adopting best management practices, including those practices related to nutrient management, conservation, production, cultivars, pest management (weeds, diseases, insects), business management, and marketing
271000Net income gains realized by the adoption of best management practices, including those practices related to nutrient management, conservation, production, cultivars, pest management (weeds, diseases, insects), business management, and marketing
49Number of producers reporting increased dollar returns per acre or reduced costs per acre
23Number of producers reporting reduction in fertilizer used per acre
27008Number of acres in conservation tillage or other Best Management Practice
2Number of producers who adopted a dedicated bioenergy crop
200Number of acres planted to a dedicated bioenergy crop
35500Tons of feedstock delivered to processor
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

North Carolina's animal production systems will become more profitable and sustainable.

Value* Outcome Description
13829Number of animal producers increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, and/or skills as related to: 1. Best management production practices (cultural, nutrient, and genetics) 2. Pest/insect, disease, weed, wildlife management 3. Financial/Farm management tools and practices (business, marketing, government policy, human resources) 4. Alternative agriculture, bioenergy, and value-added enterprises
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
1507Number of animal producers adopting Extension-recommended best management practices, including those practices related to husbandry, improved planning, marketing, and financial practices
527450Net income gains by producers adopting Extension-recommended best management practices, including those practices related to husbandry, improved planning, marketing, and financial practices
38Number of animal producers implementing Extension-recommended best management practices for animal waste management
12Tons of livestock organic by-products utilized (nutrients from waste, compost, etc)
285000Net income gain by using livestock organic by-products instead of synthetic fertilizers
35Number of waste management certifications gained or maintained due to Extension education efforts
4600Number of acres where Extension-recommended waste analysis was used for proper land application
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Producers will increase sales of food locally to more agriculturally aware consumers through market development, producer and consumer education, and new farmer and infrastructure support.

Value* Outcome Description
46Number of producers who gain skills or knowledge to increase production for local markets.
56Number of adults (including producers, food business owners, etc.) who improved knowledge of local food and agricultural systems.
15Number of children/youth who improved knowledge of local food and agricultural systems.
50Number of individuals who gain knowledge or acquire skills related to vegetable/fruit gardening, and if also reporting under Urban and Consumer Agriculture Objective, divide up the reported number appropriately between the two objectives to avoid duplication.
34Number of producers who improve local food marketing skills or knowledge.
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
3Number of new and existing access points for consumers that expand or improve their offering of local fruits and vegetables. Access points include farmers markets, retail stores, school food programs, community gardens, institutions other than schools (e.g. hospitals, universities, etc.), and other systems/access points not noted (e.g. restaurants, etc.).
18Number of producers selling their agricultural products to local markets (direct, intermediated/food service, institutional) for consumption in NC.
10Number of producers who diversified their marketing strategies into local markets (direct, intermediated/food service, institutional).
17000Gross sales of local foods by producers. (Increase in gross sales to be calculated at the state level.)
15Number of producers (and other members of the local food supply chain) who have increased revenue.
4Number of new farms (beginning farmers) selling into local markets for local consumption (in this reporting period).
11Number of individuals who grow food in community gardens.
50Number of youth who grow food in school gardens.
24Number of individuals who begin home food production by starting a vegetable and/or fruit garden, and if also reporting under Urban and Consumer Horticulture Objective, divide up the reported number appropriately between the two objectives to avoid duplication.
11Number of individuals who begin home food production by starting to raise backyard livestock.
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Agricultural producers, workers, food handlers and consumers will adopt safer food and agricultural production, handling, and distribution practices that reduce workplace and home injuries/illnesses, enhance food security, and increase the quality and safety of food that North Carolinians prepare and consume.

Value* Outcome Description
25Number of participants trained in safe home food handling, preservation, or preparation practices
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Individuals and groups will acquire leadership and decision making capacities needed to guide and actively participate in local and state organizations.

Value* Outcome Description
80Number of adults increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
80Number of adults assuming new/expanded leadership roles in the community
695Number of youth increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
30Number of youth assuming new/expanded leadership roles in the community
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
48Number of adults increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
48Number of adults assuming new/expanded leadership roles in the community
690Number of youth increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
25Number of youth assuming new/expanded leadership roles in the community
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Youth and adults will address community issues and/or challenges through volunteerism.

Value* Outcome Description
107Number of adult participants acquiring the skills needed to serve as a volunteer
58Number of youth participants reporting aspirations to serve in new or expanded volunteer roles in community
64Number of adult participants reporting aspirations to serve in new or expanded volunteer roles in community
68Number of hours adult volunteer training conducted
15Number of hours youth volunteer training conducted
16Number new volunteers recruited
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
9Increased number of hours contributed by trained adult volunteers
2Number of adult volunteers serving in new or expanded roles within Extension
5Number of adult volunteers serving in new or expanded roles beyond Extension, including community boards and task forces
5Number of adult volunteers recruiting and/or training new volunteers
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Futures that Work: School to Career Pathways

Value* Outcome Description
69Number of teachers trained in 4-H STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) curriculum
355Number of youth (students) increasing knowledge in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math)
206Total number of female participants in STEM program
115Number of high school age youth (students) participating as members of 4-H clubs
427Number of youth (students) increasing knowledge of career/employability skills
67Number of adults increasing knowledge of career/employability skills
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
61Number of teachers using 4-H STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) curriculum in their classrooms
200Number of youth (students) gaining knowledge in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math)
175Number of youth (students) gaining career / employability skills
50Number of adults gaining career / employability skills
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Consumers and communities will enhance the value of plants, animals, and landscapes while conserving valuable natural resources and protecting the environment.

Value* Outcome Description
2640Number of participants improving knowledge, attitude, skills and aspirations regarding gardening and landscape practices including plant selection and placement, turfgrass management, soil management, growing food, water conservation and water quality preservation, storm water and erosion management, green waste management, pest and wildlife management
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
840Number of participants who use extension-recommended best management practices in landscapes, turf, and gardens, including pest (insect, weed, disease) management, fertility management, water conservation, water quality preservation and pruning techniques
16000Total cost savings from the use of extension-recommended best management practices in landscapes, turf, and gardens, including pest (insect, weed, disease) management, fertility management, water conservation, water quality preservation and pruning techniques
850Number of participants who use extension-recommended pest management practices in homes, public facilities, businesses or in community pest management programs
1750Cost savings from using extension-recommended pest management practices in homes, public facilities, businesses or in community pest management programs
350Number of participants selecting appropriate landscape plants (adapted, drought tolerant, appropriate size, etc.)
4500Cost savings from the appropriate selection of landscape plants
190Number of participants growing food for home consumption
12000Value of produce grown for home consumption
65Number of participants adopting composting
35Reduced tonnage of greenwaste as a result of Extension-recommended practices including composting and proper plant selection
50Number of participants implementing extension-recommended practices to conserve water use and protect water qualty
6000Costs savings from implementing extension-recommended practices to conserve water use and protect water qualtiy
70Number of participants implementing extension-recommended practices to conserve water use and protect water qualtiy
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Youth and adult program participants will make healthy food choices, achieve the recommended amount of physical activity and reduce risk factors for chronic diseases.

Value* Impact Description
77Number of adults increasing their fruit and vegetables consumption
203Number of youth increasing their fruit and vegetable consumption
162Number of participants increasing their physical activity
18Number of adults who reduce their total cholesterol
28Number of participants who consume less sodium in their diet
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

IV. Number of Contacts Made by Extension

Type of ContactNumber
Face-to-face* 20,703
Non face-to-face** 90,676
Total by Extension staff in 2018 111,379
* Face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make directly with individuals through one-on-one visits, meetings, and other activities where staff members work directly with individuals.
** Non face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make indirectly with individuals by telephone, email, newsletters, news articles, radio, television, and other means.

V. Designated Grants Received by Extension

Type of GrantAmount
Contracts/Grants $500.00
Gifts/Donations $7,661.00
In-Kind Grants/Donations $2,000.00
United Way/Foundations $0.00
User Fees $8,445.30
Total $18,606.30

VI. Volunteer Involvement in Extension Programs

Number of Volunteers* Number of Volunteer Hours Known client contacts by volunteers Dollar Value at 24.69
4-H: 574 5,961 5,666 $ 147,177.00
Advisory Leadership System: 0 0 0 $ 0.00
Extension Community Association: 123 202 116 $ 4,987.00
Extension Master Gardener: 675 11,003 5,600 $ 271,664.00
Other: 26 83 105 $ 2,049.00
Total: 1398 17249 11487 $ 425,878.00
* The number of volunteers reflects the overall number of volunteers for multiple events.

VII. Membership of Advisory Leadership System

Advisory Council
George Quigley
Cathy Mansfield
Thad Banks
Amy Cannon
Willie Geddie
Eleanore Getz
Daryle Nobles
Jack Dewar
Chip Lucas
Tracy Jackson
Carson Phipps
Paul Maguire
Pam Pollard
Kay Bullard
Walter Wood
Livestock
Wayne Collier, Jr.
Johnny Carter
Tara King
Kevin West
Michael Herndon
Heather Broadwell
Stephen Broadwell
Christy Burns
Jennifer Faatz
Bruce Hammill
Craig Tyson
Family and Consumer Sciences
Tina Carter
Barbara Simmons
Dee Boyer
Peggy Middleton
Consuela Norwood
Kay Bullard
4-H Resource Development (Cumberland County 4-H Foundation)
Debby Lewis
Eleanore Getz
Willie Geddie
Wayne Collier, Jr.
Sherrill Jernigan
Katie West
Crystal Glover
Tyshica Smith
Mable Murray
Jolene Kreiling
Beekeeping
Kenny Jones
Paul Johnson
Bob Wholey
Connie Blacketer
Jim Fleming
4-H & Youth
Mable Murray
Deborah Bruton
Eleanore Getz
Alfreda Williams
CeSea Lawson
Alisha Horton
Cheryl Brunelle
Heather White
Angela Ray
Herminia Gomez
Patricia Lindsey
Troy Lindsey
Claudia McCauley
Consumer & Commercial Horticultural
Charles Allen
Vic Blake
Ed Spence
Maxton Bunce
Melissa Rodriguez
Vince Evans
Pat Hurley
Genette Womack
Amy Farley
Ruby Jones
George Quigley
Lee Williams
Jack Dewar
Debby Nasekos
Cheryl Garrett
Walter Wood
Leslie Kiewra
Bob Fox
Farm Advisory Committee
Vance Tyson
Pat Hall
Kevin West
Clifton McNeill, Jr.
Sherrill Jernigan
Tracy Gardner
Joe Gillis
Ryan Kennedy

VIII. Staff Membership

Lisa Childers
Title: County Extension Director
Phone: (910) 321-6880
Email: lisa_childers@ncsu.edu

Kenny Bailey
Title: Extension Agent, Agriculture
Phone: (910) 321-6871
Email: kenneth_bailey@ncsu.edu

Jessica Drake
Title: Extension Agent, 4-H Youth Development
Phone: (910) 321-6867
Email: jessica_drake@ncsu.edu

Jeanie Edwards
Title: Administrative Support Specialist, 4-H Youth Development
Phone: (910) 321-6864
Email: jeanie_edwards@ncsu.edu

Martina Fortune
Title: 4-H Program Assistant, 4-H Youth Development - Military Clubs
Phone: (910) 321-6868
Email: mcfortun@ncsu.edu

Richard Goforth
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Poultry
Phone: (704) 283-3801
Email: richard_goforth@ncsu.edu

Anthony Growe
Title: Extension Agent, Agriculture - Field Crops
Phone: (910) 321-6875
Email: amgrowe@ncsu.edu

Marissa Herchler
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Animal Food Safety (FSMA Programs)
Phone: (919) 515-5396
Email: marissa_herchler@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Marissa is an Area Specialized Agent for animal food safety, with emphasis on the new Food Safety Modernization Act rules, as they apply to feed mills in North Carolina. Please contact Marissa with any FSMA related questions, or PCQI training inquiries.

Susan Johnson
Title: Administrative Coordinator, 4-H , FCS, Urban Horticulture Support
Phone: (910) 321-6405
Email: susan_johnson@ncsu.edu

Lynette Johnston
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Food Safety
Phone: (919) 515-0303
Email: lynette_johnston@ncsu.edu

Liz Lahti
Title: Area Agent, Agriculture - Livestock
Phone: (910) 321-6862
Email: liz_lahti@ncsu.edu

Colby Lambert
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Forestry
Phone: (910) 814-6041
Email: colby_lambert@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provides educational opportunities and technical support to forest landowners, agents, and forest industry in eastern North Carolina.

Danny Lauderdale
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Nursery and Greenhouse, Eastern Region
Phone: (252) 237-0111
Email: danny_lauderdale@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provides programming to commercial ornamental nursery and greenhouse producers in eastern North Carolina.

Bill Lord
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Water Resources
Phone: (919) 496-3344
Email: william_lord@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Water quality education and technical assistance

Rachel McDowell
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Consumer and Retail Food Safety
Phone: (919) 515-9155
Email: romcdowe@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Support FCS Agents in delivering timely and evidence-based food safety education and information to stakeholders in NC.

Alyssa McMillan
Title: Administrative Support Specialist
Phone: (910) 321-6860
Email: ammcmil4@ncsu.edu

Chip Simmons
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Food Safety
Phone: (919) 414-5632
Email: odsimmon@ncsu.edu

Allan Thornton
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Commercial Vegetables and Fruits
Phone: (910) 592-7161
Email: allan_thornton@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Vegetable Extension Specialist. Conducts Extension and applied research programs for commercial vegetable and fruit growers and agents in eastern North Carolina.

Candy Underwood
Title: Extension Agent, Family and Consumer Sciences
Phone: (910) 321-6869
Email: candy_underwood@ncsu.edu

Jason Weathington
Title: Extension Agent, Agriculture - Urban Horticulture
Phone: (910) 321-6870
Email: jason_weathington@ncsu.edu

Mitch Woodward
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Watersheds and Water Quality
Phone: (919) 250-1112
Email: mdwoodwa@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: NC Cooperative Extension's Goals include: - NC's natural resources and environmental quality will be protected, conserved and enhanced. - NC will have profitable, environmentally sustainable plant, animal and food systems. Protecting our environmental resources, particularly drinking water quality, is a top priority in NC. NC Cooperative Extension is a leader in teaching, researching, and accelerating the adoption of effective water quality protection practices.

IX. Contact Information

Cumberland County Center
301 E Mountain Dr
Fayetteville, NC 28306

Phone: (910) 321-6860
Fax: (910) 321-6883
URL: http://cumberland.ces.ncsu.edu