2017 Currituck County Program Impact Report

Approved: January 25, 2018

I. Executive Summary

In 2017 Currituck County Cooperative Extension staff utilized a network of advisors and volunteers to assess needs and deliver impactful, research based programming designed to improve the quality of life for Currituck County citizens.
Currituck County Cooperative Extension Staff delivered 255 educational programs and provided face-to-face education and assistance to 12,389 citizens. Currituck Extension volunteers donated 7643 hours of service and expanded the reach of programming by over 7831 contacts. The total estimated value of volunteer contributions was $184,502. Fundraising, grants and community contributions for program enhancement in 2017 totalled $144,339.

Major initiatives identified as critical by advisory leaders and a local needs assessment included a focus on healthy eating, physical activity and chronic disease reduction; family financial management; youth and community development; profitable and sustainable agriculture; and urban and consumer horticulture.

Agriculture programs and visits have touched all aspects of Currituck agriculture in 2017, from farms to landscapes and beyond. Of particular note, fifty-two Extension Master Gardener Volunteers met the requirements for and received their recertification. As a result of participation in Extension educational programs, Currituck farmers realized $349,340 in net income gains and/or preserved wages by utilizing practices taught and maintaining pesticide applicator certifications.

Family and consumer science programming focused on health and nutrition, food safety, volunteerism and senior adult issues. Extension staff and volunteers assisted 219 Medicare beneficiaries during open enrollment saving these clients a total of $136,752 in medical and prescription drug costs. A comprehensive nutrition education program was conducted utilizing web based instruction, face to face classes as well as instructional video. Over 115 participants in these activities reported increasing fruit and vegetable intake while more than 300 reported improving their knowledge of how to access, prepare, and preserve local foods.

The Currituck County 4-H program continued to offer inquiry based educational programs focused on Science, Engineering, Technology and Math (STEM). New partnerships were formed to increase youth access to locally grown, healthy foods by establishing a 4-H community garden site as well as an outdoor classroom site at the local high school. This site will include a pollinator garden and bee hives. The 4-H Backpacks for Kids Program continued to provide weekend meals for over 150 children in need at no cost, thanks to community donations totalling nearly $15,000.

Currituck Cooperative Extension continues to offer a diverse program focused on improving the lives, land and economy of all Currituck citizens.

II. County Background

According to 2010 census data, Currituck County’s population is 23,547. Over the past 10 years, Currituck has experienced greater than 25% population growth. The Department of Commerce includes Currituck County in the Hampton Roads, Virginia Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA). Currituck is conveniently located 50 miles from the International Port of Virginia and Norfolk International Airport. The Hampton Roads MSA is the 27th largest market in the United States. There are 1.6 million people living in the Hampton Roads area. From an economic perspective Currituck has a high median income of $49,863, low unemployment and low property tax rate. This accounts for the migration of many new residents into the county. The unique landscape, Outer Banks, and tourism also attribute to the influx of people. The largest industry in Currituck is tourism. According to the Currituck County Department of Travel and Tourism, over 18 percent of Currituck’s working population is employed by the Leisure and Hospitality Industry.

Still, approximately 81% of Currituck citizens commute to jobs outside the county. Conventional places of employment only account for 5,460 workers most with low skills. Rapid growth has brought about many changes in social, economic, and political structures. The effects of development have also impacted the available natural resources and rural nature of the county. Many public policy issues and individual needs have surfaced that need the attention of political leaders, public officials, agencies and departments.

Agriculture accounts for 8% of the county's jobs. Major crops grown in Currituck are corn, wheat, soybeans, with some vegetables, fruits, nuts and berries. Roadside produce stands are prolific, especially during the summer months, though not all of these sell "Currituck Grown" produce. There are 80 active farms in Currituck County with cash receipts totaling just over $29 million.

Currituck Cooperative Extension has conducted a comprehensive investigation of the demographic changes, data, trends and issues to determine the direction and focus for educational efforts over the coming years. A needs assessment utilizing surveys and advisory leader input was conducted to establish the county-wide Extension emphasis. As a result, 6 issues were identified as high priority/urgency and include:

Health, Nutrition and Well-being
Environmental Stewardship
Family Financial Management
Youth Development
Farmland Preservation
Alternative Agriculture Economic Opportunities
Enhancing Local Food Production and Consumption

Staff members have developed plans to provide a complete program effort in each of the respective areas. Collaboration and networking with other agencies will be strengthened to address opportunities, problems, and issues holistically.

III. Objectives to Address the Cooperative Extension Long Range Plan

North Carolina's plant production systems will become more profitable and sustainable.

Value* Outcome Description
411Number of crop (all plant systems) producers increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, and/or skills as related to: 1. Best management production practices (cultural, nutrient, and genetics) 2. Pest/insect, disease, weed, wildlife management 3. Financial/Farm management tools and practices (business, marketing, government policy, human resources) 4. Alternative agriculture, bioenergy, and value-added enterprises
5Number of Extension initiated and controlled County demonstration test sites (new required for GLF/PSI reporting)
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
108Number of crop (all plant systems) producers adopting best management practices, including those practices related to nutrient management, conservation, production, cultivars, pest management (weeds, diseases, insects), business management, and marketing
349340Net income gains realized by the adoption of best management practices, including those practices related to nutrient management, conservation, production, cultivars, pest management (weeds, diseases, insects), business management, and marketing
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

North Carolina's animal production systems will become more profitable and sustainable.

Value* Outcome Description
0Number of animal producers increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, and/or skills as related to: 1. Best management production practices (cultural, nutrient, and genetics) 2. Pest/insect, disease, weed, wildlife management 3. Financial/Farm management tools and practices (business, marketing, government policy, human resources) 4. Alternative agriculture, bioenergy, and value-added enterprises
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
0Number of animal producers adopting Extension-recommended best management practices, including those practices related to husbandry, improved planning, marketing, and financial practices
10325Net income gains by producers adopting Extension-recommended best management practices, including those practices related to husbandry, improved planning, marketing, and financial practices
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Producers will increase sales of food locally to more agriculturally aware consumers through market development, producer and consumer education, and new farmer and infrastructure support.

Value* Outcome Description
99Number of adults (including producers, food business owners, etc.) who improved knowledge of local food and agricultural systems.
89Number of children/youth who improved knowledge of local food and agricultural systems.
74Number of individuals who gain knowledge or acquire skills related to vegetable/fruit gardening, and if also reporting under Urban and Consumer Agriculture Objective, divide up the reported number appropriately between the two objectives to avoid duplication.
323Number of individuals who learn how to prepare local foods, including through use of home food preservation techniques.
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
17Number of new and existing access points for consumers that expand or improve their offering of local fruits and vegetables. Access points include farmers markets, retail stores, school food programs, community gardens, institutions other than schools (e.g. hospitals, universities, etc.), and other systems/access points not noted (e.g. restaurants, etc.).
15Number of individuals who grow food in community gardens.
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Agricultural producers, workers, food handlers and consumers will adopt safer food and agricultural production, handling, and distribution practices that reduce workplace and home injuries/illnesses, enhance food security, and increase the quality and safety of food that North Carolinians prepare and consume.

Value* Outcome Description
368Number of commercial/public operators trained
785Number of pesticide application credit hours provided
15Number of participants participating in AgriSafe personal protective equipment (PPE) selection or fit testing
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
39680Value of number of non-lost work days
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Individuals and groups will acquire leadership and decision making capacities needed to guide and actively participate in local and state organizations.

Value* Outcome Description
113Number of adults increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
18Number of adults assuming new/expanded leadership roles in the community
167Number of youth increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
3Number of youth assuming new/expanded leadership roles in the community
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
113Number of adults increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
18Number of adults assuming new/expanded leadership roles in the community
167Number of youth increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
3Number of youth assuming new/expanded leadership roles in the community
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Youth and adults will address community issues and/or challenges through volunteerism.

Value* Outcome Description
205Number of adult participants acquiring the skills needed to serve as a volunteer
30Number of youth participants reporting aspirations to serve in new or expanded volunteer roles in community
93Number of adult participants reporting aspirations to serve in new or expanded volunteer roles in community
129Number of hours adult volunteer training conducted
29Number of hours youth volunteer training conducted
25Number new volunteers recruited
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
28Increased number of hours contributed by trained youth volunteers
1829Increased number of hours contributed by trained adult volunteers
71Number of adult volunteers serving in new or expanded roles within Extension
43Number of adult volunteers serving in new or expanded roles beyond Extension, including community boards and task forces
9Number of adult volunteers recruiting and/or training new volunteers
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Community members, organizations and local government will engage in collaborative dialog and decision-making to build economically, socially and environmentally resilient communities. This will be done through inclusive engagement, partnership building, and/or community planning.

Value* Outcome Description
121Number of participants increasing knowledge and skills in convening and leading inclusive, representative groups (including limited resources, new resident, or immigrant groups) for evidence based community development
48Number of participants developing skills in leading community, economic, and/or disaster planning and change
12Number of participants who increased their awareness, knowledge or skill in business related topics (e.g., management, product development, marketing, business structure options, business law and/or liability)
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
3Number of businesses created, retained, or expanded due to Extension’s community and economic development programming
94Number of participants who report new or expanded leadership roles and opportunities undertaken
267693Dollar value of in-kind resources (funding, in-kind service or volunteers) contributed to Projects or Programs in which Extension was critically involved by an organization or community to support community or economic development work
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Adults and youth will apply financial management practices to increase their economic security, which include to: meet basic necessities, increase savings, reduce debt, and build long-term assets.

Value* Outcome Description
219Number of people gaining knowledge and/or skills to increase family economic security (such as; how to access: SNAP benefits, SHIIP Medicare Part D; food cost management, cost comparison skills, shop for reverse mortgages, select long term care insurance, etc.)
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Futures that Work: School to Career Pathways

Value* Outcome Description
14Number of teachers trained in 4-H STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) curriculum
1266Number of youth (students) increasing knowledge in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math)
490Total number of female participants in STEM program
20Number of youth (students) participating in 4-H dropout prevention (student at-risk) programs
226Number of high school age youth (students) participating as members of 4-H clubs
355Number of youth (students) increasing knowledge of career/employability skills
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
14Number of teachers using 4-H STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) curriculum in their classrooms
1103Number of youth (students) gaining knowledge in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math)
34Number of youth (students) gaining career / employability skills
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Consumers, communities, and organizations will become more efficient in their use of energy and increase their proportional use of renewable energy sources (wind/microhydro/solar/landfill gas/geothermal).

North Carolinians will make decisions and adopt practices that implement effective resource protection and conservation.

Value* Outcome Description
4Number of child and youth educators aspiring to implement quality outdoor learning environments for children
205Number of youth and adults demonstrating increased knowledge of natural resources and environmental issues
77Number of youth willing to participate in conservation actions
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Consumers and communities will enhance the value of plants, animals, and landscapes while conserving valuable natural resources and protecting the environment.

Value* Outcome Description
1644Number of participants improving knowledge, attitude, skills and aspirations regarding gardening and landscape practices including plant selection and placement, turfgrass management, soil management, growing food, water conservation and water quality preservation, storm water and erosion management, green waste management, pest and wildlife management
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
71Number of participants who use extension-recommended best management practices in landscapes, turf, and gardens, including pest (insect, weed, disease) management, fertility management, water conservation, water quality preservation and pruning techniques
411Number of participants who use extension-recommended pest management practices in homes, public facilities, businesses or in community pest management programs
739Number of participants selecting appropriate landscape plants (adapted, drought tolerant, appropriate size, etc.)
224Number of participants growing food for home consumption
59Number of participants adopting composting
27Number of participants implementing extension-recommended practices to conserve water use and protect water qualty
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Youth and adult program participants will make healthy food choices, achieve the recommended amount of physical activity and reduce risk factors for chronic diseases.

Value* Impact Description
244Number of adults increasing their fruit and vegetables consumption
336Number of youth increasing their fruit and vegetable consumption
155Number of participants increasing their physical activity
31Number of participants who consume less sodium in their diet
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

IV. Number of Contacts Made by Extension

Type of ContactNumber
Face-to-face* 12,403
Non face-to-face** 57,563
Total by Extension staff in 2017 69,966
* Face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make directly with individuals through one-on-one visits, meetings, and other activities where staff members work directly with individuals.
** Non face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make indirectly with individuals by telephone, email, newsletters, news articles, radio, television, and other means.

V. Designated Grants Received by Extension

Type of GrantAmount
Contracts/Grants $15,169.00
Gifts/Donations $48,208.10
In-Kind Grants/Donations $33,643.10
United Way/Foundations $0.00
User Fees $57,607.00
Total $154,627.20

VI. Volunteer Involvement in Extension Programs

Number of Volunteers* Number of Volunteer Hours Known client contacts by volunteers Dollar Value at 24.69
4-H: 357 3,077 5,513 $ 75,971.00
Advisory Leadership System: 20 35 10 $ 864.00
Extension Community Association: 18 42 421 $ 1,037.00
Extension Master Gardener: 1,675 4,165 1,100 $ 102,834.00
Other: 98 348 787 $ 8,592.00
Total: 2168 7667 7831 $ 189,298.00
* The number of volunteers reflects the overall number of volunteers for multiple events.

VII. Membership of Advisory Leadership System

Senior Programming
Sheila Gregory
Evelyn Henley
Erline Jones
Georgia Kight
Health & Wellness
Olivia Jones, Chairman
Amy Underhill
Angelia Siddle
Stephanie Leahey
Debbie LaShomb
Stacy Joseph
James Mims
Kim Dozier
Lindsay Voohees
Kristina Ussery
Leslie Price
Sarah Alford
Sheila Gregory
Debra Embrey
Samantha Norvell
Rebecca Christenbury
Sarah Tyson
Extension & Community Association
Evelyn Henley
Erline Jones
Georgia Kight
Master Gardener Executive Committee
Peggy Lilienthal
Lesley Miner
Penny Leary-Smith
Kerrie O'Toole
Lewis Barnett
Extension Historical Preservation Committee
Rodney Sawyer
Georgia Kight
Faytie Johnston
4-H Volunteer Leaders Association
Heather Campbell
Kathy Melton
Trish Rippin
Stacy Belue
Currituck County Advisory Leadership Council
Josh Bass
Lisa Bess
Bobby Hanig
Theresa Dozier
Julie Folwick
Shelly Haskell
Evelyn Henley
Peggy Jordan
Donna Kesler
Peggy Lilienthal
Jaileen Morelen
Megan Morgan
Renja Murray
Randy Owens
Sandra Tunnel

VIII. Staff Membership

Cameron Lowe
Title: County Extension Director, Currituck & Camden
Phone: (252) 232-2261
Email: cameron_lowe@ncsu.edu

Jody Carpenter
Title: Extension Agent, Agriculture - Field Crops
Phone: (252) 232-2261
Email: jbcarpe5@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: I provide aid to the agricultural community in the form of educational opportunities with the latest research from NC State University. Areas of responsibility include field crops, pesticide education, consumer horticulture and local foods.

Candice Christian
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Consumer & Retail Food Safety
Phone: (919) 515-9148
Email: Candice_Christian@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: The overall goal of the Area Specialized Agents (ASAs) in Consumer & Retail Food Safety is to support FCS Agents in delivering timely and evidence-based food safety education and information to stakeholders in North Carolina.

Erin Eure
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Commercial Fruits & Vegetables
Phone: (252) 357-1400
Email: erin_eure@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provides educational opportunities and technical support to commercial fruit and vegetable growers, agents, and industry in northeastern NC.

Sherry Fischlschweiger
Title: Extension Agent, 4-H Youth Development
Phone: (252) 232-2261
Email: sherry_fischlschweiger@ncsu.edu

Steve Gabel
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Aquaculture
Phone: (252) 482-6585
Email: steve_gabel@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Responsible for aquaculture educational programs for the NC NE extension district.

Sheila Gregory
Title: Program Assistant, Family and Consumer Sciences
Phone: (252) 232-2261
Email: sheila_gregory@ncsu.edu

Tom Harrell
Title: 4-H Program Assistant, 4-H Youth Development
Phone: (252) 232-2261
Email: tom_harrell@ncsu.edu

Marissa Herchler
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Animal Food Safety (FSMA Programs)
Phone: (919) 515-5396
Email: marissa_herchler@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Marissa is an Area Specialized Agent for animal food safety, with emphasis on the new Food Safety Modernization Act rules, as they apply to feed mills in North Carolina. Please contact Marissa with any FSMA related questions, or PCQI training inquiries.

Olivia Jones
Title: Area Agent, Family and Consumer Sciences
Phone: (252) 232-2261
Email: olivia_jones@ncsu.edu

Danny Lauderdale
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Nursery and Greenhouse, Eastern Region
Phone: (252) 237-0111
Email: danny_lauderdale@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provides programming to commercial ornamental nursery and greenhouse producers in eastern North Carolina.

Bill Lord
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Water Resources
Phone: (919) 496-3344
Email: william_lord@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Water quality education and technical assistance

Sherry Lynn
Title: County Extension Administrative Assistant
Phone: (252) 232-2261
Email: sherry_lynn@ncsu.edu

Stephanie Minton
Title: 4-H Program Assistant
Phone: (252) 232-2262
Email: stephanie_minton@ncsu.edu

Margaret Ross
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Poultry
Phone: (252) 670-8254
Email: margaret_ross@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Working with commercial poultry producers to assist in writing nutrient management plans and conducting educational programming.

Chip Simmons
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Food Safety
Phone: (919) 414-5632
Email: odsimmon@ncsu.edu

Scott Tilley
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Field Crops
Phone: (252) 793-4428
Email: scott_tilley@ncsu.edu

Mitch Woodward
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Watersheds and Water Quality
Phone: (919) 250-1112
Email: mdwoodwa@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: NC Cooperative Extension's Goals include: - NC's natural resources and environmental quality will be protected, conserved and enhanced. - NC will have profitable, environmentally sustainable plant, animal and food systems. Protecting our environmental resources, particularly drinking water quality, is a top priority in NC. NC Cooperative Extension is a leader in teaching, researching, and accelerating the adoption of effective water quality protection practices.

IX. Contact Information

Currituck County Center
120 Community Way
Barco, NC 27917

Phone: (252) 232-2261
Fax: (252) 453-2782
URL: http://currituck.ces.ncsu.edu