2017 Davidson County Program Impact Report

Approved: January 22, 2018

I. Executive Summary

2017 was a very positive and successful year because this staff works together and functions like a championship team. Our work and commitment to the citizens of Davidson County was evident by the 17,152 face-to-face contacts made by the staff over the last year. Our major focus included agricultural profitability, food safety, volunteerism, and youth development. Extension educational programs offered by the Davidson County staff are strongly supported. During 2017, we received $32,490 through donations, grants, and specific program funds. This financial support allowed the programs to be highly effective and provided an experience participants did not want to miss.

The staff has made significant impacts in all areas of the plan of work. They worked with 12 advisory committees, which have helped identify needs, as well as evaluate and promote local programs. The programming has led to tremendous volunteer support for Cooperative Extension in the county. Our staff has documented 788 volunteers serving a combined total of 5,344 hours. The NCCES values this time at 24.14 per hour. This translates into $129,004 worth of service at no cost to the taxpayers.

A major emphasis of our 2017 4-H programming was to provide youth access to quality STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) learning opportunities. As a result, Davidson Co. 4-H reached 2,491 students with these programs. It is also important that young people grow up to be productive members of society. To support this, Davidson Co. 4-H also provided 2,579 youth with training designed to provide career and employable skills.

When we think about the youth of today being tomorrow’s leaders and decision makers, 4-H plays a vital role in preparing youth for the challenges ahead. Davidson County is home to both the North Central District 4-H President and Secretary/Treasurer. The success of these young ladies have inspired two more 4-H teen leaders to run for district offices in 2018. In addition, one of the current district officers plans to run for a 4-H state office.

Davidson County's number one industry continues to be Agriculture. To maintain and strengthen this status, the Davidson County Cooperative Extension strived to make the county's plant, animal and food systems more profitable. In 2017, these efforts improved net return by more than $2.42 million. The local foods movement and marketing efforts increased income from sales of locally produced agriculture products by $725,587. The staff's educational efforts also saved general consumers in Davidson County over $ 227,755 through knowledgeable purchasing and cost saving practices. In addition, Davidson County currently has 404 parcels of land totaling 14,966.7acres enrolled in the Voluntary Agriculture District (VAD).

The Davidson County Extension staff continued to place a major emphasis on the Safety and Security of Our Food and Farm Systems. This included a broad range of programming from pesticide education and Good Agricultural Practices (GAP) training for produce and tobacco growers to Safe Plate training for food processing and service industry workers. This training resulted in 26 food service managers obtaining their Safe Plate certificate. With an average cost per food borne illness outbreak of $75,000 for a food service establishment, this program has potentially saved $1,950,000. In addition, commercial pesticide applicators attended training which provide re-certification credit hours. Over $1.477 million in wages to employees were preserved through commercial pesticide applicator re-certification classes in 2017.

In 2017, the Davidson County Staff was effective in empowering Davidson County citizens by providing meaningful solutions that have enriched the lives, land, and economy of the County.

II. County Background

Davidson County is ranked 11th in state population. It is classified as an urban county based on population, but functions very much as a rural county. The northern part of the county reflects suburban neighborhoods, or bedroom communities, for Winston-Salem and High Point. South of I-85 remains largely agricultural and rural by contrast. At the end of the 20th century the county was characterized by textiles, tobacco and furniture; but with the loss of jobs in these industries, the county has done very well in terms of to diversifying its economic base. This has resulted in 47% of the county's population commuting out of the county for work currently; however the recent efforts by economic development groups have brought in many new jobs. Due to excellent infrastructure of roads and transportation systems, as well as, proximity to major cities, Davidson County was listed by Metropolitan as the most desirable place in the nation for industry location for a community of its size in 2008. The county is continually working on its image and branding to establish its identity and uniqueness. The county has purchased the land and began to develop a 100 acre industrial park located directly along I-85 between Lexington and the Yadkin River.

To identify county issues for the Cooperative Extension Service (CES) to address, the staff conducts environmental scans every few years to reassess existing needs and identify new and emerging needs. The CES staff has targeted existing audiences and incorporated surveys that should point out strong opportunities to increase participation of those not currently involved with programming that could greatly benefit their lives and livelihood. The County's Advisory Leadership System members are actively involved by helping explain demographics and trends. These surveys have included a diverse population, from displaced company workers and their families to cattle and grain growers that are experiencing weak prices on agriculture sales without a lot of reduction in input cost. The business that supports the agriculture industry and general population are also considered when evaluating community needs. The results allow the Davidson County CES staff to prioritize needs, find the most effective program delivery strategies and serve a vast majority with limited personnel.

In general, the following needs and issues have been identified as areas where CES has programming strengths, resources and support and were prioritized based on need. The emphasis on traditional agriculture, including agronomic crops, livestock, poultry and forestry must continue as it is an important part in the county's economic strength. This would include retention of farms and farmland, farm safety, energy efficiency, and implementing practices that improve both profitability and quality of life. In addressing this need we must teach the importance and means to protect the environmental and natural resources, and promote sound practices for proper waste disposal, pesticide use, water management and management practices that improve air and water quality.

A rapidly expanding need is education and support for entrepreneurship opportunities revolving around small acreage agriculture. This is being driven by two major forces; one being food safety and the buy local foods initiative, and the other being the need to find new income opportunities to support a quality life. To facilitate both goals, we must strive to assist growers engaged in agricultural enterprises with production information, market development, and agricultural alternative enterprise evaluations. Some of these growers are current or former traditional agriculture producers, such as tobacco growers looking for alternatives, and others are budding entrepreneurs wanting to utilize the resources they have to improve profitability. As part of supporting this need, CES will continue to support existing farmers markets, the establishment of new markets or outlets, and guidance for Community Supported Agriculture programs.

Another aspect of food is food safety. This includes Safe Plate training and certification. This need is expressed and supported by local food establishments including restaurants and grocery stores. Currently, Davidson County has more than 360 individuals that are certified.

Youth need quality, educational opportunities that focus on healthy lifestyles, career exploration, and citizenship skills in order to address childhood obesity, the dropout rate, and to increase leadership in today's society.

The goal of the CES is to improve the quality of life for the citizens of Davidson County by providing research-based education through the process of empowering people to find solutions in areas related to life, land and the economy.

III. Objectives to Address the Cooperative Extension Long Range Plan

North Carolina's plant production systems will become more profitable and sustainable.

Value* Outcome Description
279Number of crop (all plant systems) producers increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, and/or skills as related to: 1. Best management production practices (cultural, nutrient, and genetics) 2. Pest/insect, disease, weed, wildlife management 3. Financial/Farm management tools and practices (business, marketing, government policy, human resources) 4. Alternative agriculture, bioenergy, and value-added enterprises
3Number of Extension initiated and controlled County demonstration test sites (new required for GLF/PSI reporting)
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
111Number of crop (all plant systems) producers adopting best management practices, including those practices related to nutrient management, conservation, production, cultivars, pest management (weeds, diseases, insects), business management, and marketing
2234553Net income gains realized by the adoption of best management practices, including those practices related to nutrient management, conservation, production, cultivars, pest management (weeds, diseases, insects), business management, and marketing
111Number of producers reporting increased dollar returns per acre or reduced costs per acre
77Number of producers reporting reduction in fertilizer used per acre
18000Number of acres in conservation tillage or other Best Management Practice
17850Tons of feedstock delivered to processor
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

North Carolina's animal production systems will become more profitable and sustainable.

Value* Outcome Description
319Number of animal producers increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, and/or skills as related to: 1. Best management production practices (cultural, nutrient, and genetics) 2. Pest/insect, disease, weed, wildlife management 3. Financial/Farm management tools and practices (business, marketing, government policy, human resources) 4. Alternative agriculture, bioenergy, and value-added enterprises
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
56Number of animal producers adopting Extension-recommended best management practices, including those practices related to husbandry, improved planning, marketing, and financial practices
136310Net income gains by producers adopting Extension-recommended best management practices, including those practices related to husbandry, improved planning, marketing, and financial practices
37Number of animal producers implementing Extension-recommended best management practices for animal waste management
1425Tons of livestock organic by-products utilized (nutrients from waste, compost, etc)
55280Net income gain by using livestock organic by-products instead of synthetic fertilizers
10Number of waste management certifications gained or maintained due to Extension education efforts
5745Number of acres where Extension-recommended waste analysis was used for proper land application
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Producers will increase sales of food locally to more agriculturally aware consumers through market development, producer and consumer education, and new farmer and infrastructure support.

Value* Outcome Description
41Number of producers who gain skills or knowledge to increase production for local markets.
1452Number of individuals who gain knowledge or acquire skills related to vegetable/fruit gardening, and if also reporting under Urban and Consumer Agriculture Objective, divide up the reported number appropriately between the two objectives to avoid duplication.
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
6Number of new and existing access points for consumers that expand or improve their offering of local fruits and vegetables. Access points include farmers markets, retail stores, school food programs, community gardens, institutions other than schools (e.g. hospitals, universities, etc.), and other systems/access points not noted (e.g. restaurants, etc.).
38Number of producers selling their agricultural products to local markets (direct, intermediated/food service, institutional) for consumption in NC.
20Number of producers who diversified their marketing strategies into local markets (direct, intermediated/food service, institutional).
725587Gross sales of local foods by producers. (Increase in gross sales to be calculated at the state level.)
25Number of producers (and other members of the local food supply chain) who have increased revenue.
6Number of new farms (beginning farmers) selling into local markets for local consumption (in this reporting period).
248Number of individuals who begin home food production by starting a vegetable and/or fruit garden, and if also reporting under Urban and Consumer Horticulture Objective, divide up the reported number appropriately between the two objectives to avoid duplication.
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Agricultural producers, workers, food handlers and consumers will adopt safer food and agricultural production, handling, and distribution practices that reduce workplace and home injuries/illnesses, enhance food security, and increase the quality and safety of food that North Carolinians prepare and consume.

Value* Outcome Description
388Number of commercial/public operators trained
42Number of pesticide application credit hours provided
1Number of participants participating in AgriSafe personal protective equipment (PPE) selection or fit testing
26Number of food service employees receiving ServSafe certification
30Number of participants trained in safe home food handling, preservation, or preparation practices
26TOTAL number of food handlers receiving food safety training and education in safe food handling practices (new required data for federal reporting)
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
1477958Value of number of non-lost work days
240Number of persons certified in Good Agricultural Practices (GAPs) or Good Handling Practices (GHPs)
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Individuals and groups will acquire leadership and decision making capacities needed to guide and actively participate in local and state organizations.

Value* Outcome Description
15Number of adults increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
15Number of adults assuming new/expanded leadership roles in the community
258Number of youth increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
51Number of youth assuming new/expanded leadership roles in the community
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
15Number of adults increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
15Number of adults assuming new/expanded leadership roles in the community
258Number of youth increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
51Number of youth assuming new/expanded leadership roles in the community
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Futures that Work: School to Career Pathways

Value* Outcome Description
103Number of teachers trained in 4-H STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) curriculum
2491Number of youth (students) increasing knowledge in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math)
1183Total number of female participants in STEM program
6Number of youth (students) participating in 4-H dropout prevention (student at-risk) programs
35Number of high school age youth (students) participating as members of 4-H clubs
2579Number of youth (students) increasing knowledge of career/employability skills
6Number of adults increasing knowledge of career/employability skills
126Number of youth (students) increasing knowledge of entrepreneurship
6Number of adults increasing knowledge of entrepreneurship
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
97Number of teachers using 4-H STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) curriculum in their classrooms
2491Number of youth (students) gaining knowledge in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math)
2579Number of youth (students) gaining career / employability skills
6Number of adults gaining career / employability skills
126Number of youth (students) gaining entrepreneurship skills
6Number of adults gaining entrepreneurship skills
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

North Carolinians will make decisions and adopt practices that implement effective resource protection and conservation.

Value* Outcome Description
93Number of participants increasing their knowledge about best management practices
2Number of participants certified to implement and maintain BMPs
411Number of youth and adults demonstrating increased knowledge of natural resources and environmental issues
36Number of youth willing to participate in conservation actions
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
8Number of participants that adopted recommended climate adaption strategies for production agriculture or natural resource management, including for invasive species, pest management, pollutant loads, and wetlands.
10750Number of acres under recommended climate adaption strategies for production agriculture or natural resource management, including for invasive species, pest management, pollutant loads, and wetlands.
9Number of participants that adopted recommended climate mitigation practices such as water-use efficiency, livestock production feeding practices, carbon sequestration, reducing carbon or energy footprint.
639Number of acres under recommended climate mitigation practices such as water-use efficiency, livestock production feeding practices, carbon sequestration, reducing carbon or energy footprint.
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Consumers and communities will enhance the value of plants, animals, and landscapes while conserving valuable natural resources and protecting the environment.

Value* Outcome Description
2159Number of participants improving knowledge, attitude, skills and aspirations regarding gardening and landscape practices including plant selection and placement, turfgrass management, soil management, growing food, water conservation and water quality preservation, storm water and erosion management, green waste management, pest and wildlife management
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
1723Number of participants who use extension-recommended best management practices in landscapes, turf, and gardens, including pest (insect, weed, disease) management, fertility management, water conservation, water quality preservation and pruning techniques
93932Total cost savings from the use of extension-recommended best management practices in landscapes, turf, and gardens, including pest (insect, weed, disease) management, fertility management, water conservation, water quality preservation and pruning techniques
1377Number of participants who use extension-recommended pest management practices in homes, public facilities, businesses or in community pest management programs
75123Cost savings from using extension-recommended pest management practices in homes, public facilities, businesses or in community pest management programs
369Number of participants selecting appropriate landscape plants (adapted, drought tolerant, appropriate size, etc.)
58700Cost savings from the appropriate selection of landscape plants
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Youth and adult program participants will make healthy food choices, achieve the recommended amount of physical activity and reduce risk factors for chronic diseases.

Value* Impact Description
4Number of adults increasing their fruit and vegetables consumption
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

IV. Number of Contacts Made by Extension

Type of ContactNumber
Face-to-face* 17,162
Non face-to-face** 10,958
Total by Extension staff in 2017 28,120
* Face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make directly with individuals through one-on-one visits, meetings, and other activities where staff members work directly with individuals.
** Non face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make indirectly with individuals by telephone, email, newsletters, news articles, radio, television, and other means.

V. Designated Grants Received by Extension

Type of GrantAmount
Contracts/Grants $0.00
Gifts/Donations $26,435.71
In-Kind Grants/Donations $0.00
United Way/Foundations $0.00
User Fees $6,055.00
Total $32,490.71

VI. Volunteer Involvement in Extension Programs

Number of Volunteers* Number of Volunteer Hours Known client contacts by volunteers Dollar Value at 24.69
4-H: 178 1,344 930 $ 33,183.00
Advisory Leadership System: 83 279 780 $ 6,889.00
Extension Community Association: 38 375 100 $ 9,259.00
Extension Master Gardener: 422 3,115 6,198 $ 76,909.00
Other: 67 231 1,027 $ 5,703.00
Total: 788 5344 9035 $ 131,943.00
* The number of volunteers reflects the overall number of volunteers for multiple events.

VII. Membership of Advisory Leadership System

Davidson County Advisory Leadership Council
Kent Beck
Mary Ruth Sheets
Suzanne Brewer
Guy Bowers
Thom Hege
Henry Sink, Jr
Francses Lanier
Vicky Gray
Dennis Loflin
Matt Shafer
Amber Allison
Evan Burrows
Janie Foltz
Edsel Daniels


Davidson County 4-H Advisory Board
Mary Ruth Sheets
Nita Jarrett
Linda Russo
Carolyn Jones
Stephanie Kyne
Felicity Borgen
Jason Borgen
Nathan Tangel
Marcie Roper
Jan Greer
Sherlyn Thompson

Lexington Farmers Market Board
Beth Leonard
Barbara Potter
Harry Brittain
Jack Clowney
Jim Honeycutt
Bob Husted
Frankie Mefford
Mark Petruzzi
Jennifer Rosencrans
Todd Trexler


Davidson County Family & Consumer Sciences & ECA Advisory Committee
Frances Lanier
Rebecca Pierce
Louise Jackson
Joe Browder
Greg Hennessee
Davidson County Agronomy Advisory Committee
Taylor Cottrell
Tim Loflin
Charlie Thomas
Jason Hedgecock
Tim Burkhart
Larry Essick
Joe Hayworth
Scott Hedgecock
Davidson county Horse Advisory Committee
Gail Fritts
Doug Owen
Fran Bassett
Marie Freeman
Milda Minter
Gail Nifong
Clint Nifong
Davidson County Master Gardener Volunteers Advisory Board
Ruth Mitchum
Linda Gallagher
Judy Gill
Cindy Scott
Martha Yarbarough
Sue Smith
Bob Weatherly
Anice Griffin
Brenda Journey
Tricia Royster
Linda Snider
Peggy Walser
Thomasville Farmers Market Advisory Committee
Steve Cline
Mary Caroline Cridlebaug
Marilyn Conrad
Joan Wright
Beef Cattle Advisory Board
Suzanne Brewer
Adam Hilton
Kent Beck
Luther Fritts
Jim Davis
David Skeen
Neil Snider
Eddie Smith

VIII. Staff Membership

Troy Coggins
Title: County Extension Director
Phone: (336) 242-2081
Email: troy_coggins@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Field Crops (Tobacco, Corn, Soybeans, Small Grains, Cotton), Pesticide Coordinator, County Level Administration

Amy Ballard
Phone: (336) 242-2080
Email: aeballa2@ncsu.edu

Matt Barber
Title: Extension Agent, 4-H Youth Development
Phone: (336) 242-2086
Email: matthew_barber@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Engaging youth in learning and personal growth activities. Develop and implement programs for the youth of Davidson County.

Marie Bruff
Title: County Extension Administrative Assistant
Phone: (336) 242-2080
Email: marie_bruff@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Family & Consumer Science Secretary, Livestock Secretary, Field Crops Secretary, Facilities Coordinator

Marti Day
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Dairy
Phone: (919) 542-8202
Email: marti_day@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Responsible for educational programs for dairy farmers, youth with an interest in dairy projects and the general public with an interest in dairy foods and the dairy industry.

Sara Drake
Title: Extension Agent, Livestock and Forage Crops
Phone: (336) 242-2082
Email: sara_drake@ncsu.edu

Lauren Greene
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Poultry
Phone: (336) 651-7347
Email: lauren_greene@ncsu.edu

Marissa Herchler
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Animal Food Safety (FSMA Programs)
Phone: (919) 515-5396
Email: marissa_herchler@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Marissa is an Area Specialized Agent for animal food safety, with emphasis on the new Food Safety Modernization Act rules, as they apply to feed mills in North Carolina. Please contact Marissa with any FSMA related questions, or PCQI training inquiries.

Stacey Jones
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Commercial Nursery and Greenhouse
Phone: (704) 920-3310
Email: stacey_jones@ncsu.edu

Jami Lawhon
Title: Area Agent, Family and Consumer Sciences
Phone: (336) 242-2080
Email: jami_lawhon@ncsu.edu

Bill Lord
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Water Resources
Phone: (919) 496-3344
Email: william_lord@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Water quality education and technical assistance

Craig Mauney
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Commercial Vegetables & Fruits
Phone: (828) 684-3562
Email: craig_mauney@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provides educational opportunities, training and technical support to commercial fruit and vegetable growers, agents, and industry in Western NC.

Rachel McDowell
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Consumer and Retail Food Safety
Phone: (919) 515-9155
Email: romcdowe@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Support FCS Agents in delivering timely and evidence-based food safety education and information to stakeholders in NC.

Currey Nobles
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Food Safety
Phone: (919) 515-9520
Email: canobles@ncsu.edu

Elena Rogers
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Food Safety - Fresh Produce Western NC
Phone: (828) 352-2519
Email: elena_rogers@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provide educational programs, training and technical support focusing on fresh produce safety to Agents and growers in Western NC.

Laurie Stevens
Title: Temporary Extension Agent -Family and Consumer Sciences
Phone: (336) 242-2080
Email: lrsteve3@ncsu.edu

Mitch Woodward
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Watersheds and Water Quality
Phone: (919) 250-1112
Email: mdwoodwa@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: NC Cooperative Extension's Goals include: - NC's natural resources and environmental quality will be protected, conserved and enhanced. - NC will have profitable, environmentally sustainable plant, animal and food systems. Protecting our environmental resources, particularly drinking water quality, is a top priority in NC. NC Cooperative Extension is a leader in teaching, researching, and accelerating the adoption of effective water quality protection practices.

IX. Contact Information

Davidson County Center
301 E Center St
Lexington, NC 27292

Phone: (336) 242-2080
Fax: (336) 249-7300
URL: http://davidson.ces.ncsu.edu