2018 Alleghany County Program Impact Report

Approved: January 21, 2019

I. Executive Summary

The Alleghany Center has been extremely productive and motivated to bring quality research based programming to the residents of the county. Throughout the year, Extension has been readily supported by an active Advisory Leadership Council and various other advisory committees, that resulted in an increased impact to our programming efforts. The office has also been successful due to the positive relationship that we maintain with Alleghany County Government and other partnering agencies.

Alleghany Extension professionals conducted nearly 100 educational programs and meetings with over 15,000 face-to-face contacts at various programming efforts. There were numerous news articles printed in our local paper with a circulation of more than 69,000; two blogs were updated on a regular basis as well as other social media outlets; radio programs were presented quarterly by each to a listening audience of 120,000 and the county website had posts made on a regular basis.

In 2018, the Alleghany staff reported working with more than 250 volunteers to provide Extension programs. Those volunteers who devoted over 540 hours of time to support Extension services. The value of Extension Volunteers is more than $13,000. Extension volunteers serve in many different roles and capacities. Our impact within the community is compounded by the gracious work and time that our volunteers provide.

Alleghany 4-H was very successful in 2018 and served more than 891 youth through varied educational methods and utilized over 150 volunteers in diverse programming areas. Funds were raised to support these programs through in-kind donations, a letter campaign drive and other fundraising events. Several field days and school enrichment projects were also held to provide hands-on learning opportunities to youth. Three youth field days were offered including a 2nd grade Farm Animal Day, a joint Alleghany and Grayson, Virginia High School Safety Field Day and a 4th grade Rural and Community Safety day. More than 300 youth were served at these events. Youth were also reached through summer fun programming, summer camp, District Activity Day, after school programming, community programming and numerous other county, district and state events.

Family and Consumer Sciences continues to work in Alleghany to improve Healthy Eating and Chronic Disease Reduction. These programs focus on youth and adults through programs and partnerships with Alleghany County Schools, the Solid Rock Food Closet, Alleghany Ministerium and Appalachian District Health Department. Programs are conducted regularly throughout the year with more than 405 participants being reached.

New and expanding operations of locally produced products continues to be successful in Alleghany. In 2018 more than 40 farms that are marketed locally produced products. The farmers market continues to be prosperous and the number of vendors continues to increase. The market ran an additional two months in 2018 due to the continued success and growth. Alleghany Extension has also been working hard to provide outlets and markets to locally produced food and is continuing to expand avenues and resources. Agriculture awareness in Alleghany also continues to be emphasized with more than 225 individuals attending the Annual Agriculture Recognition Banquet held each February. There has also been a need to expand the livestock showing courses as more youth are eager to learn a new skill. Four camps were offered in 2018 and additional, expanded efforts will be made in 2019.

Alleghany Extension works diligently to continually expand improve upon offered programs and services to meet the needs of the citizens within our community.

II. County Background

Alleghany County is a rural county in the northwest mountains adjoining the Virginia border. It has a NC Department of Commerce designation as a Tier 1 economically distressed county. Census estimates the county population of approximately 10,848 permanent residents. The county population is 87.0% white, 9.6% Hispanic and 1.8% Black. 25.5% of the population is age 65 or older. There are seven voting townships. The town of Sparta is the only incorporated town, with a population of just under 1,800 people. Alleghany County faces issues common to other rural mountain counties including loss of employment opportunity, new jobs creation, workforce preparedness, public school facility improvement, and maintaining a balance of providing county services with funding revenue sources that encourage quality of life for all county citizens.

Through formal and informal discussions, the Alleghany Center of North Carolina Cooperative Extension met with the following groups to identify issues, needs and opportunities for developing county extension programs. The groups that were utilized to identify needs include; Extension Advisory Leadership Council members and Program Committees, elected County and Municipal Officials, County Manager, and County Department Heads, Chamber of Commerce, civic groups, community based organizations, agricultural commodity groups, and citizens. These responses identified priority issues to include: Economic Development; Community Development; Volunteerism Development; Youth Development; Health and Nutrition and Profitable and Sustainable Agriculture.

The Extension staff of the Alleghany Center will continue to respond to identified issues and opportunities in several ways. They will continue to deliver quality educational programs through varied delivery methods. Evaluation of these programs will be used to measure outcomes and demonstrate accountability to local partners. Extension’s networks, contacts and community involvement creates relationships with NC State University, North Carolina A&T State University and the public sector ensuring availability to expertise that can help address local issues. Finally, Cooperative Extension in Alleghany County is seen as a committed community partner through civic engagement, providing leadership in community initiatives, and commitment of organizational and human resources in seeking solutions to local priority issues. The Extension staff will strive to continue this model and level of achievement.

Cooperative Extension will provide educational programming that will empower people and provide research based knowledge for solutions addressing identified issues and will report under the following statewide objectives:

Healthy Eating, Physical Activity, and Chronic Disease Reduction
Local Food Systems
School to Career: Youth and Adults
Profitable and Sustainable Animal Production Systems
Community Development
Volunteer Readiness
Safety and Security of our Food and Farm Systems

III. Objectives to Address the Cooperative Extension Long Range Plan

North Carolina's plant production systems will become more profitable and sustainable.

Value* Outcome Description
16Number of crop (all plant systems) producers increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, and/or skills as related to: 1. Best management production practices (cultural, nutrient, and genetics) 2. Pest/insect, disease, weed, wildlife management 3. Financial/Farm management tools and practices (business, marketing, government policy, human resources) 4. Alternative agriculture, bioenergy, and value-added enterprises
4Number of Extension initiated and controlled County demonstration test sites (new required for GLF/PSI reporting)
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
15Number of crop (all plant systems) producers adopting best management practices, including those practices related to nutrient management, conservation, production, cultivars, pest management (weeds, diseases, insects), business management, and marketing
18000Net income gains realized by the adoption of best management practices, including those practices related to nutrient management, conservation, production, cultivars, pest management (weeds, diseases, insects), business management, and marketing
4Number of producers reporting increased dollar returns per acre or reduced costs per acre
8Number of producers reporting reduction in fertilizer used per acre
1910Number of acres in conservation tillage or other Best Management Practice
735Tons of feedstock delivered to processor
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

North Carolina's animal production systems will become more profitable and sustainable.

Value* Outcome Description
69Number of animal producers increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, and/or skills as related to: 1. Best management production practices (cultural, nutrient, and genetics) 2. Pest/insect, disease, weed, wildlife management 3. Financial/Farm management tools and practices (business, marketing, government policy, human resources) 4. Alternative agriculture, bioenergy, and value-added enterprises
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
71Number of animal producers adopting Extension-recommended best management practices, including those practices related to husbandry, improved planning, marketing, and financial practices
58500Net income gains by producers adopting Extension-recommended best management practices, including those practices related to husbandry, improved planning, marketing, and financial practices
8Number of animal producers implementing Extension-recommended best management practices for animal waste management
1600Tons of livestock organic by-products utilized (nutrients from waste, compost, etc)
40000Net income gain by using livestock organic by-products instead of synthetic fertilizers
8Number of waste management certifications gained or maintained due to Extension education efforts
1450Number of acres where Extension-recommended waste analysis was used for proper land application
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Producers will increase sales of food locally to more agriculturally aware consumers through market development, producer and consumer education, and new farmer and infrastructure support.

Value* Outcome Description
20Number of producers who gain skills or knowledge to increase production for local markets.
191Number of adults (including producers, food business owners, etc.) who improved knowledge of local food and agricultural systems.
28Number of children/youth who improved knowledge of local food and agricultural systems.
5Number of individuals who gain knowledge or acquire skills related to vegetable/fruit gardening, and if also reporting under Urban and Consumer Agriculture Objective, divide up the reported number appropriately between the two objectives to avoid duplication.
38Number of producers who improve local food marketing skills or knowledge.
154Number of individuals who learn how to prepare local foods, including through use of home food preservation techniques.
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
7Number of new and existing access points for consumers that expand or improve their offering of local fruits and vegetables. Access points include farmers markets, retail stores, school food programs, community gardens, institutions other than schools (e.g. hospitals, universities, etc.), and other systems/access points not noted (e.g. restaurants, etc.).
33Number of producers selling their agricultural products to local markets (direct, intermediated/food service, institutional) for consumption in NC.
20Number of producers who diversified their marketing strategies into local markets (direct, intermediated/food service, institutional).
37000Gross sales of local foods by producers. (Increase in gross sales to be calculated at the state level.)
17Number of producers (and other members of the local food supply chain) who have increased revenue.
4Number of new farms (beginning farmers) selling into local markets for local consumption (in this reporting period).
3Number of new local food value chain businesses, other than farms (in this reporting period).
161Number of pounds of local foods donated for consumption by vulnerable populations.
32Number of youth who grow food in school gardens.
6Number of individuals who begin home food production by starting a vegetable and/or fruit garden, and if also reporting under Urban and Consumer Horticulture Objective, divide up the reported number appropriately between the two objectives to avoid duplication.
8Number of individuals who begin home food production by starting to raise backyard livestock.
300Number of pounds of fresh produce donated for consumption by vulnerable populations.
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Agricultural producers, workers, food handlers and consumers will adopt safer food and agricultural production, handling, and distribution practices that reduce workplace and home injuries/illnesses, enhance food security, and increase the quality and safety of food that North Carolinians prepare and consume.

Value* Outcome Description
3Number of food service employees receiving ServSafe certification
1027Number of participants trained in safe home food handling, preservation, or preparation practices
27TOTAL number of food handlers receiving food safety training and education in safe food handling practices (new required data for federal reporting)
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
3Number of participants implementing ServSafe
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Youth and adults will address community issues and/or challenges through volunteerism.

Value* Outcome Description
6Number of adult participants acquiring the skills needed to serve as a volunteer
6Number of youth participants reporting aspirations to serve in new or expanded volunteer roles in community
1Number of adult participants reporting aspirations to serve in new or expanded volunteer roles in community
4Number of hours adult volunteer training conducted
12Number of hours youth volunteer training conducted
1Number new volunteers recruited
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
50Increased number of hours contributed by trained youth volunteers
3288Increased number of hours contributed by trained adult volunteers
3Number of youth volunteers serving in new or expanded roles within Extension
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Community members, organizations and local government will engage in collaborative dialog and decision-making to build economically, socially and environmentally resilient communities. This will be done through inclusive engagement, partnership building, and/or community planning.

Value* Outcome Description
227Number of participants increasing knowledge and skills in convening and leading inclusive, representative groups (including limited resources, new resident, or immigrant groups) for evidence based community development
4Number of participants developing skills in leading community, economic, and/or disaster planning and change
1Number of communities that have included agricultural and food system considerations into disaster preparedness plans or procedures due to Extension’s involvement
4Number of residents that increase their knowledge in disaster preparedness planning, mitigation and recovery
6Number of participants who increased their awareness, knowledge or skill in business related topics (e.g., management, product development, marketing, business structure options, business law and/or liability)
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
1Number of businesses created, retained, or expanded due to Extension’s community and economic development programming
4Number of local food councils in which Extension is involved
5Number of participants who adopted disaster preparedness and mitigation practices
3Number of participants who report new or expanded leadership roles and opportunities undertaken
5000Dollar value of in-kind resources (funding, in-kind service or volunteers) contributed to Projects or Programs in which Extension was critically involved by an organization or community to support community or economic development work
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Futures that Work: School to Career Pathways

Value* Outcome Description
9Number of teachers trained in 4-H STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) curriculum
732Number of youth (students) increasing knowledge in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math)
418Total number of female participants in STEM program
6Number of high school age youth (students) participating as members of 4-H clubs
233Number of youth (students) increasing knowledge of career/employability skills
255Number of youth (students) increasing knowledge of entrepreneurship
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
9Number of teachers using 4-H STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) curriculum in their classrooms
586Number of youth (students) gaining knowledge in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math)
200Number of youth (students) gaining career / employability skills
216Number of youth (students) gaining entrepreneurship skills
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Youth and adult program participants will make healthy food choices, achieve the recommended amount of physical activity and reduce risk factors for chronic diseases.

Value* Impact Description
17Number of adults increasing their fruit and vegetables consumption
91Number of youth increasing their fruit and vegetable consumption
108Number of participants increasing their physical activity
1Number of adults who improve their blood glucose (A1c.)level
10Number of participants who consume less sodium in their diet
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

IV. Number of Contacts Made by Extension

Type of ContactNumber
Face-to-face* 8,481
Non face-to-face** 6,606
Total by Extension staff in 2018 15,087
* Face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make directly with individuals through one-on-one visits, meetings, and other activities where staff members work directly with individuals.
** Non face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make indirectly with individuals by telephone, email, newsletters, news articles, radio, television, and other means.

V. Designated Grants Received by Extension

Type of GrantAmount
Contracts/Grants $6,500.00
Gifts/Donations $8,520.00
In-Kind Grants/Donations $5,470.00
United Way/Foundations $0.00
User Fees $1,153.00
Total $21,643.00

VI. Volunteer Involvement in Extension Programs

Number of Volunteers* Number of Volunteer Hours Known client contacts by volunteers Dollar Value at 25.43
4-H: 139 119 716 $ 3,026.00
Advisory Leadership System: 47 4 83 $ 102.00
Extension Community Association: 0 0 0 $ 0.00
Extension Master Gardener: 0 0 0 $ 0.00
Other: 77 426 761 $ 10,833.00
Total: 263 549 1560 $ 13,961.00
* The number of volunteers reflects the overall number of volunteers for multiple events.

VII. Membership of Advisory Leadership System

Christmas Tree Specialized Committee
Lizabeth Roupe
Seth Andrews
Johnny Wishon
Kimberly Sides
Della Deal
Sherri Severt
Livestock Specialized Committee
Bobby Davis
Scott Stoker
Gail Sheets
David Gambill
Brad Gambill
Larry Cox
Bill Ebert
Advisory Council
Mike James
Bob Bamburg
Larry Prince
Susie Gambill
Coby LaRue
Gerald Leftwich
Delta Peterson
Cliff Phillips
Ken Richardson
Charles Rudy
Susan Worrell
Jane Wyatt
Extension Community Association
Eva Rice
Twyla Kennedy
Susan Worrell
Marie Pruitt
Theresa March
Eleanor Plummer
4-H Advisory Committee
Elizabeth Brooks
Brad Edwards
Tiffany Boyer
Charles Rudy
Susan Worrell
Dairy Producers Committee
Jimmy Joines
Randolph Fender
Frank Fender
Greg Crouse

VIII. Staff Membership

Amy Lucas
Title: County Extension Director and Extension Agent, 4-H Youth Development
Phone: (336) 372-5597
Email: amy_lucas@ncsu.edu

Brent Buchanan
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Dairy
Phone: (315) 212-1277
Email: babuchan@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Dairy Extension Programming in Western North Carolina Counties of Haywood, Madison, Buncombe, Transylvania, Henderson, Yancey, McDowell, Polk, Rutherford, Mitchell, Avery, Burke, Cleveland, Watauga, Caldwell, Catawba, Lincoln, Gaston, Ashe, Wilkes, Alexander, Iredell, Alleghany, Surry, Yadkin, and Davie.

April Dillon
Title: Area Extension Agent, 4-H Youth Development
Phone: (704) 482-4365
Email: april_dillon@ncsu.edu

Monica Dolinger
Title: County Extension Secretary
Phone: (336) 372-5597
Email: mldoling@ncsu.edu

Lauren Greene
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Poultry
Phone: (336) 651-7347
Email: lauren_greene@ncsu.edu

Michele Hamm
Title: County Extension Administrative Assistant
Phone: (336) 372-5597
Email: michele_hamm@ncsu.edu

Marissa Herchler
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Animal Food Safety (FSMA Programs)
Phone: (919) 515-5396
Email: marissa_herchler@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Marissa is an Area Specialized Agent for animal food safety, with emphasis on the new Food Safety Modernization Act rules, as they apply to feed mills in North Carolina. Please contact Marissa with any FSMA related questions, or PCQI training inquiries.

Carmen Long
Title: Area Agent, Family and Consumer Sciences
Phone: (336) 401-8025
Email: carmen_long@ncsu.edu

Bill Lord
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Water Resources
Phone: (919) 496-3344
Email: william_lord@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Water quality education and technical assistance

Craig Mauney
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Commercial Vegetables and Fruits
Phone: (828) 684-3562
Email: craig_mauney@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provides educational opportunities, training and technical support to commercial fruit and vegetable growers, agents, and industry in Western NC.

Rachel McDowell
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Consumer and Retail Food Safety
Phone: (919) 515-9155
Email: romcdowe@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Support FCS Agents in delivering timely and evidence-based food safety education and information to stakeholders in NC.

Currey Nobles
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Food Safety
Phone: (919) 515-9520
Email: canobles@ncsu.edu

Elena Rogers
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Food Safety - Fresh Produce Western NC
Phone: (828) 352-2519
Email: elena_rogers@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provide educational programs, training and technical support focusing on fresh produce safety to Agents and growers in Western NC.

Amanda Taylor
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Nursery and Greenhouse, Western Region
Phone: (828) 475-2915
Email: amanda_jo_taylor@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provides programming to commercial nursery and greenhouse producers in Alexander, Alleghany, Ashe, Avery, Buncombe, Burke, Caldwell, Catawba, Cherokee, Clay, Cleveland, Gaston, Graham, Haywood, Henderson, Jackson, Lincoln, Macon, Madison, McDowell, Mitchell, Polk, Rutherford, Swain, Transylvania, Watauga, Wilkes, and Yancey Counties.

Aaron Ray Tompkins
Title: Extension Agent, Agriculture
Phone: (336) 372-5597
Email: aaron_tompkins@ncsu.edu

Mitch Woodward
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Watersheds and Water Quality
Phone: (919) 250-1112
Email: mdwoodwa@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: NC Cooperative Extension's Goals include: - NC's natural resources and environmental quality will be protected, conserved and enhanced. - NC will have profitable, environmentally sustainable plant, animal and food systems. Protecting our environmental resources, particularly drinking water quality, is a top priority in NC. NC Cooperative Extension is a leader in teaching, researching, and accelerating the adoption of effective water quality protection practices.

IX. Contact Information

Alleghany County Center
90 S Main St
Sparta, NC 28675

Phone: (336) 372-5597
Fax: (336) 372-2279
URL: http://alleghany.ces.ncsu.edu