2019 Alleghany County Program Impact Report

Approved: January 26, 2020

I. Executive Summary

The Alleghany Center has been extremely productive and we work diligently to bring quality research based programming to the residents of the county. Throughout 2019, Extension has been readily supported by an active Advisory Leadership Council and various other advisory committees, that resulted in an tremendous impact to our programming efforts. We are also extremely successful due to the positive relationship that we maintain with Alleghany County Government and other partnering agencies including the Alleghany Chamber of Commerce, Alleghany County School District and Alleghany County Soil and Water Agency to name a few.

Alleghany Extension professionals conducted nearly 100 educational programs and meetings with over 6,000 direct contacts for staff members at these varied programming efforts. There were numerous news articles printed in our local paper with a circulation of more than 69,000; numerous media outlets were updated on a regular basis as well as other social media avenues; radio programs were presented quarterly to a listening audience of 120,000 and the county website had posts made on a regular basis.

In 2019, the Alleghany staff reported working with more than 290 volunteers to provide Extension programs. Those volunteers who devoted over 5,700 hours of time to support Extension services. The value of Extension Volunteers is more than $147,000. Extension volunteers serve in many different roles and capacities. Our impact within the community is compounded by the gracious work and time that our volunteers provide.

Alleghany 4-H was very successful in 2019 and served more than 800 youth through varied educational methods and utilized more than 100 volunteers in diverse programming areas. Funds were raised to support these programs through in-kind donations, a letter campaign drive and other fundraising events. Several field days and school enrichment projects were also held to provide hands-on learning opportunities to youth. Three youth field days were offered including a 2nd grade Farm Animal Day, a joint Alleghany and Grayson, Virginia High School Safety Field Day and a 4th grade Rural and Community Safety day. More than 300 youth were served at these events. Youth were also reached through summer fun programming, summer camp, District Activity Day, after school programming, community programming and numerous other county, district and state events.

Family and Consumer Sciences continues to work in Alleghany to improve Healthy Eating and Chronic Disease Reduction. These programs focus on youth and adults through programs and partnerships with Alleghany County Schools, the Solid Rock Food Closet, Alleghany Ministerium and Appalachian District Health Department. Programs are conducted regularly throughout the year with more than 400 participants being reached. The most successful programs were Diabetes Today, Med instead of Meds and ECA programming.

New and expanding operations of locally produced products continues to be successful in Alleghany. In 2019, more than 40 farms worked with Extension to market locally produced products. The farmers market continues to be prosperous and the number of vendors continues to increase. The market ran an additional two months in 2019 due to the continued success and growth. Alleghany Extension has also been working hard to provide outlets and markets to locally produced food and is continuing to expand avenues and resources. Agriculture awareness in Alleghany also continues to be emphasized with more than 250 individuals attending the Annual Agriculture Recognition Banquet held each February. There has also been a need to expand the livestock showing courses as more youth are eager to learn a new skill.

Alleghany Extension works diligently to continually expand improve upon offered programs and services to meet the needs of the citizens within our community. We are very proud to work within Alleghany County and will continue to improve on services we offer.

II. County Background

Alleghany County is a rural county in the northwest mountains adjoining the Virginia border. It has a NC Department of Commerce designation as a Tier 2 county and just recently was designated with this economic status. Census estimates the county population of approximately 11,031 permanent residents. The county population is 88.6% white, 9.6% Hispanic and 1.8% Black. 27% of the population is age 65 or older. There are seven voting townships. The town of Sparta is the only incorporated town, with a population of just under 1,800 people. Alleghany County faces issues common to other rural mountain counties including loss of employment opportunity, new jobs creation, workforce preparedness, public school facility improvement, and maintaining a balance of providing county services with funding revenue sources that encourage quality of life for all county citizens.

Through formal and informal discussions, the Alleghany Center of North Carolina Cooperative Extension met with the following groups to identify issues, needs and opportunities for developing county extension programs. The groups that were utilized to identify needs include; Extension Advisory Leadership Council members and Program Committees, elected County and Municipal Officials, County Manager, and County Department Heads, Chamber of Commerce, civic groups, community based organizations, agricultural commodity groups, and citizens. These responses identified priority issues to include: Economic Development; Community Development; Volunteerism Development; Youth Development; Health and Nutrition and Profitable and Sustainable Agriculture.

The Extension staff of the Alleghany Center will continue to respond to identified issues and opportunities in several ways. They will continue to deliver quality educational programs through varied delivery methods. Evaluation of these programs will be used to measure outcomes and demonstrate accountability to local partners. Extension’s networks, contacts and community involvement creates relationships with NC State University, North Carolina A&T State University and the public sector ensuring availability to expertise that can help address local issues. Finally, Cooperative Extension in Alleghany County is seen as a committed community partner through civic engagement, providing leadership in community initiatives, and commitment of organizational and human resources in seeking solutions to local priority issues. The Extension staff will strive to continue this model and level of achievement.

Cooperative Extension will provide educational programming that will empower people and provide research based knowledge for solutions addressing identified issues and will report under the following statewide objectives:

Healthy Eating, Physical Activity, and Chronic Disease Reduction
Food Safety
School to Career: Youth and Adults
Profitable and Sustainable Animal Production Systems
Community Development
Volunteer Readiness
Plant and Animal Production Systems

III. Objectives to Address the Cooperative Extension Long Range Plan

Our family and consumer sciences programs improve the well-being of individuals, families, and communities.

Value* Outcome Description
38Number of adults increasing knowledge of life skills (such as goal setting, stress management, self-care and healthy relationships)
10Number of adults increasing their knowledge of community resources
10Number of adults and professionals increasing their knowledge of human development over the life course and emerging best practices in parenting and caregiving
10Number of parents and other caregivers of children increasing their knowledge of positive parenting practices (such as communication and discipline)
20Number of people gaining knowledge and/or skills in managing financial products and financial identity (such as; credit, debt management, identify theft, credit reports and scores, scams, banking skills)
3Number of people gaining knowledge and/or skills to protect family assets (such as; foreclosure prevention, insurance, implementing a financial document protection strategy against natural disasters, bankruptcy prevention, etc.)
3Number of people gaining knowledge and/or skills to increase family economic security (such as; how to access: SNAP benefits, SHIIP Medicare Part D; food cost management, cost comparison skills, shop for reverse mortgages, select long term care insurance, etc.)
12Number of participants increasing knowledge of best management practices related to reducing energy use/increasing energy efficiency
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
38Number of adults using effective life skills (such as goal setting, stress management, self-care and healthy relationships)
10Number of adults increasing their use of identified community resources
10Number of parents/other caregivers of children adopting positive parenting practices (such as communication and discipline)
12Number of participants engaging in best management practices related to reducing energy use/increasing energy efficiency
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Our plant production programs improve production, profitability, and sustainability of the agriculture sector.

Value* Outcome Description
6Number of producers who gain skills or knowledge to increase production for local markets.
6Number of producers who improve local food marketing skills or knowledge.
52Number of pesticide applicators receiving continuing education credits
204Number of pesticide credit hours provided
18Number of crop (all plant systems) producers increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, and/or skills as related to: 1. Best management production practices (cultural, nutrient, and genetics) 2. Pest/insect, disease, weed, wildlife management 3. Financial/Farm management tools and practices (business, marketing, government policy, human resources) 4. Alternative agriculture, bioenergy, and value-added enterprises
4Number of Extension initiated and controlled county demonstration test sites
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
11Number of producers who diversified their marketing strategies into local markets (direct, intermediated/food service, institutional).
18Number of producers (and other members of the local food supply chain) who have increased revenue
4Number of new farms (beginning farmers) selling into local markets for local consumption (in this reporting period)
1Number of farmers, employees or family members adopting regular use of appropriate PPE following AgriSafe or Certified Safe Farm participation
2Number of participants that have adopted farm safety practices
6Number of producers reporting reduction in fertilizer used per acre
2500Number of acres in conservation tillage or other Best Management Practice
6Number of crop (all plant systems) producers adopting best management practices, including those practices related to nutrient management, conservation, production, cultivars, pest management (weeds, diseases, insects), business management, and marketing
6Number of producers who adopted a dedicated bioenergy crop
12Number of acres planted to a dedicated bioenergy crop
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Our animal production programs improve production, profitability, and sustainability of the agriculture sector.

Value* Outcome Description
14Number of producers who improve local food marketing skills or knowledge.
53Number of producers who gain skills or knowledge to increase production for local markets.
42Number of animal producers who increased knowledge of farm business management, business planning, financial management, marketing, or estate planning.
23Number of animal producers who learned how to develop a management plan (i.e. grazing plan, feeding plan, drought plan, business plan, disaster plan, etc.)
45Number of producers who increased knowledge of pasture/forage management practices (field improvement, herbicide management, grazing season extension, weed control, forage quality, haylage production, nitrate testing, etc.)
33Number of producers who increased knowledge of nutrition, ration balancing, mineral supplements, breeding, and reproduction
48Number of producers who increased knowledge of the strategies to promote animal health and welfare and reduce the potential for infectious diseases through proper use of vaccines, biosecurity, detection and identification of common diseases, appropriate use of animal medications, and mitigation of antimicrobial resistance transmission
12Number of producers who increased knowledge of animal waste management practices
36Number of animal waste management credits earned through Extension programs
4Number of Extension conducted on-site sludge surveys or equipment calibrations
21Number of producers who increased knowledge of how to prepare, mitigate, and recover from natural disasters impacting animal agriculture
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
14Number of producers who diversified their marketing strategies into local markets (direct, intermediated/food service, institutional).
3Number of new farms (beginning farmers) selling into local markets for local consumption (in this reporting period)
16Number of producers (and other members of the local food supply chain) who have increased revenue
1Number of farms certified as a Certified Safe Farm
1Number of farms that made safety improvements following a CSF on-farm safety review
5Number of participants that have adopted farm safety practices
12Number of farmers, employees or family members adopting regular use of appropriate PPE following AgriSafe or Certified Safe Farm participation
6Number of producers adopting extension-recommended practices related to planning, marketing, and financial management
9Number of producers implementing Extension-recommended best management practices for animal waste management
1500Number of acres where Extension-recommended nutrient applications were used
32Number of producers who adopted Extension-recommended best management practices and production changes related to quality assurance (vaccinations, castration, culling techniques, etc.)
6Number of producers who adopted Extension-recommended best management practices and production changes related to genetic improvement (AI, heifer/bull selection)
18Number of producers who adopted Extension-recommended best management practices and production changes related to nutrition (mineral, feed rations)
14Number of producers who adopted Extension-recommended best management practices and production changes related to internal parasite management (fecals, deworming)
12Number of producers who adopted Extension-recommended best management practices related to pasture management
21Number of producers who adopted Extension-recommended best management practices and production changes related to nutrition, ration balancing, mineral supplement, breeding, and reproduction
4Number of producers using improved biosecurity practices
11Number of waste utilization/waste management plans developed or updated
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Our community development programs build strong and thriving communities.

Value* Outcome Description
5Number of adult participants acquiring the skills needed to serve as a volunteer
4Number of participants acquiring knowledge and skills to convene and lead inclusive groups
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Our 4-H youth development programs grow the skills young people need to succeed in life and career.

Value* Outcome Description
13Number of teachers trained in 4-H STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) curriculum
729Number of youth (students) increasing knowledge in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math)
368Total number of female participants in STEM program
727Number of youth increasing knowledge of life skills
629Number of children/youth who improved knowledge of local food and agricultural systems.
727Number of youth increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
265Number of youth demonstrating increased knowledge of natural resources and environmental issues
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
15Number of teachers using 4-H STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) curriculum in their classrooms
263Number of youth (students) gaining career / employability skills
171Number of youth (students) gaining entrepreneurship skills
312Number of youth using effective life skills
48Number of youth willing to participate in conservation actions
94Number of youth increasing their physical activity
12Number of youth volunteers serving in new or expanded roles within Extension
4Number of youth volunteers serving in new or expanded roles beyond Extension, including community boards and task forces
2Number of youth assuming new/expanded leadership roles in the community
173Number of youth increasing their fruit and vegetable consumption
31Number of youth who grow food in school gardens.
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Our consumer horticulture programs teach families and communities about environmentally friendly methods for gardening and controlling pests.

Value* Outcome Description
11Number of individuals who gain knowledge or acquire skills related to vegetable/fruit gardening
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
5Number of individuals who begin home food production by starting a vegetable and/or fruit garden
11Number of individuals who begin home food production by starting to raise backyard livestock.
14Number of participants who use extension-recommended best management practices in landscapes, turf, and gardens, including pest (insect, weed, disease, wildlife) and soil management
26Number of participants selecting appropriate landscape plants (adapted, drought tolerant, appropriate size, etc.)
24Number of participants growing food for home consumption
5Number of participants adopting composting
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Our food safety and nutrition programs create a safer and more sustainable food supply and improve the health and nutrition of individuals, families, and our communities.

Value* Outcome Description
15Number of participants who increase their knowledge of safe home food handling, preservation, or preparation practices
15Number of individuals who learn how to prepare local foods, including through use of home food preservation techniques.
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
30Number of adults increasing their fruit and vegetables consumption
20Number of participants increasing their physical activity
8Number of participants who consume less sodium in their diet
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

IV. Number of Contacts Made by Extension

Type of ContactNumber
Face-to-face* 6,355
Non face-to-face** 301,724
Total by Extension staff in 2019 308,079
* Face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make directly with individuals through one-on-one visits, meetings, and other activities where staff members work directly with individuals.
** Non face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make indirectly with individuals by telephone, email, newsletters, news articles, radio, television, and other means.

V. Designated Grants Received by Extension

Type of GrantAmount
Contracts/Grants $25,000.00
Gifts/Donations $9,137.00
In-Kind Grants/Donations $4,090.00
United Way/Foundations $0.00
User Fees $576.00
Total $38,803.00

VI. Volunteer Involvement in Extension Programs

Number of Volunteers* Number of Volunteer Hours Known client contacts by volunteers Dollar Value at 25.43
4-H 108 178 1818 $ 4,527.00
Advisory Leadership System 39 4 0 $ 102.00
Extension Community Association 36 4597 0 $ 116,902.00
Other: Agriculture 110 822 1257 $ 20,903.00
Other: Food & Nutrition 2 192 240 $ 4,883.00
Total: 295 5793 3315 $ 147,316.00
* The number of volunteers reflects the overall number of volunteers for multiple events.

VII. Membership of Advisory Leadership System

Christmas Tree Specialized Committee
Kimberly Sides
Kathy Shore
Simon Smit
Scott Smith
Buddy Deal
Livestock Specialized Committee
Bobby Davis
Scott Stoker
Gail Sheets
David Gambill
Brad Gambill


Advisory Council
Mike James
Bob Bamburg
Sarah Dalton
Larry Prince
Susie Gambill
Coby LaRue
Gerald Leftwich
Delta Peterson
Cliff Phillips
Veronica Riley
Ken Richardson
Charles Rudy
Susan Worrell
Jane Wyatt

Extension Community Association
Eva Rice
Twyla Kennedy
Susan Worrell
Marie Pruitt
Theresa March
Eleanor Plummer
4-H Advisory Committee
Elizabeth Brooks
Brad Edwards
Tiffany Boyer
Susan Worrell
Veronica Riley
Dairy Producers Committee
Jimmy Joines
Randolph Fender
Frank Fender
Greg Crouse
Youth Dairy Advisory
Travis Dalton
Bo Blevins
Maggie Evans
Blue Ridge Livestock Advisory
Bill Hash
Lorri Townsend
Melissa Gambill

VIII. Staff Membership

Amy Lucas
Title: County Extension Director and Extension Agent, 4-H Youth Development
Phone: (336) 372-5597
Email: amy_lucas@ncsu.edu

Jill Cockerham
Title: Program Assistant, Local Foods
Phone: (336) 372-5597
Email: jccocker@ncsu.edu

Marti Day
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Dairy
Phone: (919) 542-8202
Email: marti_day@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Responsible for educational programs for dairy farmers, youth with an interest in dairy projects and the general public with an interest in dairy foods and the dairy industry.

April Dillon
Title: Area Extension Agent, 4-H Youth Development
Phone: (704) 482-4365
Email: april_dillon@ncsu.edu

Lauren Greene
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Poultry
Phone: (336) 651-7347
Email: lauren_greene@ncsu.edu

Michele Hamm
Title: County Extension Administrative Assistant
Phone: (336) 372-5597
Email: michele_hamm@ncsu.edu

Marissa Herchler
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Animal Food Safety (FSMA Programs)
Phone: (919) 515-5396
Email: marissa_herchler@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Marissa is an Area Specialized Agent for animal food safety, with emphasis on the new Food Safety Modernization Act rules, as they apply to feed mills in North Carolina. Please contact Marissa with any FSMA related questions, or PCQI training inquiries.

Carmen Long
Title: Area Agent, Family and Consumer Sciences
Phone: (336) 401-8025
Email: carmen_long@ncsu.edu

Craig Mauney
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Commercial Vegetables and Fruits
Phone: (828) 684-3562
Email: craig_mauney@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provides educational opportunities, training and technical support to commercial fruit and vegetable growers, agents, and industry in Western NC. (My office is located at the Mountain Horticulture Crops Research and Extension Center not the Henderson County Extension Center as is noted by IT on this website. Please do not contact the Henderson County Extension Center as I am not located there.)

Ashley Robbins
Title: Area Specialized Agent - Dairy
Phone: (919) 542-8203
Email: ashley_robbins@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Marti Day and I are the Area Specialized Dairy Agents - the county-based arm of the Cooperative Extension Dairy Team. We are out here in the counties to help you set and reach your farm, family and business goals. We have collaborative expertise in the areas of Waste Management, Udder Health, Cow Comfort, Nutrition and Forage Management with specialties in (Ashley)Reproduction, Records Management, Animal Health and (Marti)Alternative Markets, Organic Dairy, Grazing Management, and On-farm Processing. We hope to provide comprehensive educational programs for our farmers, consumers and youth for every county across the state. We are here for you by phone, email or text and look forward to working with you!

Elena Rogers
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Food Safety - Fresh Produce Western NC
Phone: (828) 352-2519
Email: elena_rogers@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provide educational programs, training and technical support focusing on fresh produce safety to Agents and growers in Western NC.

Amanda Taylor
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Nursery and Greenhouse, Western Region
Phone: (828) 475-2915
Email: amanda_jo_taylor@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provides programming to commercial nursery and greenhouse producers in Alexander, Alleghany, Ashe, Avery, Buncombe, Burke, Caldwell, Catawba, Cherokee, Clay, Cleveland, Gaston, Graham, Haywood, Henderson, Jackson, Lincoln, Macon, Madison, McDowell, Mitchell, Polk, Rutherford, Swain, Transylvania, Watauga, Wilkes, and Yancey Counties.

Aaron Ray Tompkins
Title: Extension Agent, Agriculture
Phone: (336) 372-5597
Email: aaron_tompkins@ncsu.edu

Mitch Woodward
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Watersheds and Water Quality
Phone: (919) 414-3873
Email: mdwoodwa@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: NC Cooperative Extension's Goals include: - NC's natural resources and environmental quality will be protected, conserved and enhanced. - NC will have profitable, environmentally sustainable plant, animal and food systems. Protecting our environmental resources, particularly drinking water quality, is a top priority in NC. NC Cooperative Extension is a leader in teaching, researching, and accelerating the adoption of effective water quality protection practices.

IX. Contact Information

Alleghany County Center
90 S Main St
Sparta, NC 28675

Phone: (336) 372-5597
Fax: (336) 372-2279
URL: http://alleghany.ces.ncsu.edu