2017 Davie County Program Impact Report

Approved: January 23, 2018

I. Executive Summary

In 2017, the North Carolina Cooperative Extension, Davie County Center, served 30,311 county residents through educational workshops, demonstrations, field days, newsletters and individual consultations. Davie County Extension agents and volunteers delivered 85 educational programs for 519 hours of training to 2,686 participants. During the past year, 492 Extension volunteers made 1,609 contacts and contributed 4,830 hours of volunteer service, valued at $24.14 per hour, for a total economic value of $116,596 in the county. Outside funding totaling $37,560 was also secured to support programs in 2017.

North Carolina has the 16th highest adult obesity rate and the 25th highest childhood obesity rate in the nation. In the Steps to Health program, 163 third graders learned how to read food labels and make healthier, more nutritious food choices. Other programs, such as Farm to Table and Jr. Cooking focused on foods and nutrition for youth and taught 98 additional children how to make wise choices and prepare foods.

The Davie 4-H program reached 8,487 youth through clubs, school enrichment programs, camps, summer activities and various special interest activities including presentation day, hippology, project records, livestock shows and much more. The Farm Animal Day program was delivered to 564-second grade students and teachers. During Farm Animal Day, students traveled to a local farm and learned about different facets of crop and livestock production and where food really comes from.

In the local foods area, two county farmers markets continued growth offering viable local markets for area producers with Extension’s support. Rhubarb, blueberry and muscadine production workshops taught 56 small farmers how to better produce and manage these crops. The Davie County Extension Master Gardener Volunteers continued their strong outreach in the county with a Fall Gardening Series and a Pollinator Protection Workshop and their annual Jr. Master Gardener Camps for youth.

Animal producers are utilizing rotational grazing, alternative plant nutritive sources, alternative feed sources, alternative marketing sources, improved weed and insect management, improved farm financial tools and improving the genetic quality of their animals as recommended by Extension. These simple management tools decrease input costs, increase efficiency of the existing resources, improve record keeping and increase profit potential. Thirty-eight animal producers gained $62,000 in income by following these recommendations. In addition, 18 animal producers gained $57,000 in income by utilizing the 31,000 tons of organic by-products generated by the animals instead of utilizing synthetic fertilizers.

The Voluntary Agricultural District Program continues to grow enrolling one farm and 54 acres in 2017, with a total enrollment of 39 farms and 4,310 acres. The county also adopted a Farmland Protection Plan this year.

Environmental and natural resource protection was also addressed in 2017. Eighteen licensed private pesticide applicators and 45 licensed commercial pesticide applicators attended training to receive recertification credits required to maintain these licenses. Pesticide use and safety are major issues concerning food safety, environmental quality and personal safety. In these trainings, applicators received important updates and information for making safe and responsible pesticide applications. At the Pesticide Collection Day, 56 containers weighing over 400 pounds of unused, unwanted pesticides were collected for safe disposal. In addition, 470 fourth grade students attended Conservation Field Day where they learned about threats to the environment and natural resources and ways to take responsible action on behalf of the environment.

II. County Background

Davie County is located in the upper Piedmont area of North Carolina having a land area of 264 square miles, making it the 16th smallest county in the state. According to the 2010 census, the total county population is 41,420. According to census figures, the county has gone from a single population center to two comparable population centers, one being Mocksville, the county seat, and the other the Hillsdale/Bermuda Run/Advance area. The county population breakdown by race is 87.5 percent white, 6.3 percent African American, 6.1 percent Hispanic or Latino origin, and less than one percent Asian, American Indian and native Hawaiian.

According to the 2010-2014 American Community Survey by the U.S. Census Bureau, the percentage of the county population living below the poverty level is 14.4 percent, compared to 17.6 percent in the state. The median household income is $49,591, and the unemployment rate is 5.1 percent, compared to $46,693 and 6.6 percent for North Carolina.

Approximately 58 percent of the Davie workforce work outside of the county. The three industries serving as the top employers in the county are educational services, including health care and social assistance, manufacturing and retail trade. Davie has seen recent growth in the manufacturing industry attracting new employers, such as Ashley Furniture and Gildan Activewear. Other manufacturers have expanded facilities creating new jobs. A new Davie Medical Center opened in late 2013 creating new jobs and offering a state of the art health care facility for residents. A new high school is currently under construction in the county.

According to the 2012 Census of Agriculture, Davie County has 59,618 acres in farms with 640 farms with an average size of 93 acres. Gross sales of agricultural products are just under $25 million annually with approximately 65% from livestock and 35% from crops. The county falls within the Yadkin Valley American Viticultural Area and is home to several vineyards and wineries supporting the tourism industry in the state.

Cooperative Extension staff conducted an environmental scan in 2007 by first working with the Davie County Advisory Leadership Council (ALC) and other Extension advisory leadership groups to develop a list of county issues and needs. The ALC then grouped the list of issues and needs into six categories: Improving Health and Nutrition; Increasing Leadership, Personal Development and Citizenship Skills; Increasing Economic Opportunity and Business Development; Increasing Educational Achievement and Excellence Improving the Agricultural and Food Systems and Environmental Stewardship and Natural Resource Management. Since the 2007 Environmental Scan, Davie County Extension Agents continue to work with different committees that make up the Davie County Advisory Leadership System to help Extension identify current trends, issues and needs.

Davie County Cooperative Extension will continue to provide educational programming to empower people and provide solutions. Extension provides practical education to help people, businesses, and communities solve problems; develop skills and build a better future. In 2017, Davie County Cooperative Extension programs will address the following statewide objectives: Healthy Eating, Physical Activity, and Chronic Disease Risk Reduction; School to Career; Profitable and Sustainable Animal Production Systems; Profitable and Sustainable Plant Production Systems; Local Food Systems; Volunteer Readiness; Leadership Development; Natural Resources Conservation and Environmental Sustainability; Safety and Security of Our Food and Farm Systems and Urban and Consumer Agriculture.

III. Objectives to Address the Cooperative Extension Long Range Plan

North Carolina's plant production systems will become more profitable and sustainable.

North Carolina's animal production systems will become more profitable and sustainable.

Value* Outcome Description
57Number of animal producers increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, and/or skills as related to: 1. Best management production practices (cultural, nutrient, and genetics) 2. Pest/insect, disease, weed, wildlife management 3. Financial/Farm management tools and practices (business, marketing, government policy, human resources) 4. Alternative agriculture, bioenergy, and value-added enterprises
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
38Number of animal producers adopting Extension-recommended best management practices, including those practices related to husbandry, improved planning, marketing, and financial practices
62000Net income gains by producers adopting Extension-recommended best management practices, including those practices related to husbandry, improved planning, marketing, and financial practices
18Number of animal producers implementing Extension-recommended best management practices for animal waste management
31000Tons of livestock organic by-products utilized (nutrients from waste, compost, etc)
57000Net income gain by using livestock organic by-products instead of synthetic fertilizers
9Number of waste management certifications gained or maintained due to Extension education efforts
8500Number of acres where Extension-recommended waste analysis was used for proper land application
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Producers will increase sales of food locally to more agriculturally aware consumers through market development, producer and consumer education, and new farmer and infrastructure support.

Value* Outcome Description
68Number of producers who gain skills or knowledge to increase production for local markets.
57Number of adults (including producers, food business owners, etc.) who improved knowledge of local food and agricultural systems.
36Number of children/youth who improved knowledge of local food and agricultural systems.
78Number of individuals who gain knowledge or acquire skills related to vegetable/fruit gardening, and if also reporting under Urban and Consumer Agriculture Objective, divide up the reported number appropriately between the two objectives to avoid duplication.
68Number of producers who improve local food marketing skills or knowledge.
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
6Number of new and existing access points for consumers that expand or improve their offering of local fruits and vegetables. Access points include farmers markets, retail stores, school food programs, community gardens, institutions other than schools (e.g. hospitals, universities, etc.), and other systems/access points not noted (e.g. restaurants, etc.).
54Number of producers selling their agricultural products to local markets (direct, intermediated/food service, institutional) for consumption in NC.
5Number of producers who diversified their marketing strategies into local markets (direct, intermediated/food service, institutional).
4000Gross sales of local foods by producers. (Increase in gross sales to be calculated at the state level.)
8Number of producers (and other members of the local food supply chain) who have increased revenue.
7Number of new farms (beginning farmers) selling into local markets for local consumption (in this reporting period).
1Number of new local food value chain businesses, other than farms (in this reporting period).
34Number of individuals who grow food in community gardens.
3200Number of pounds of local foods donated for consumption by vulnerable populations.
62Number of youth who grow food in school gardens.
13Number of individuals who begin home food production by starting a vegetable and/or fruit garden, and if also reporting under Urban and Consumer Horticulture Objective, divide up the reported number appropriately between the two objectives to avoid duplication.
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Agricultural producers, workers, food handlers and consumers will adopt safer food and agricultural production, handling, and distribution practices that reduce workplace and home injuries/illnesses, enhance food security, and increase the quality and safety of food that North Carolinians prepare and consume.

Value* Outcome Description
63Number of commercial/public operators trained
24Number of pesticide application credit hours provided
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
28Number of participants that have adopted farm safety practices
3500Value of number of non-lost work days
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Individuals and groups will acquire leadership and decision making capacities needed to guide and actively participate in local and state organizations.

Value* Outcome Description
87Number of adults increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
45Number of adults assuming new/expanded leadership roles in the community
6Number of youth increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
4Number of youth assuming new/expanded leadership roles in the community
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
38Number of adults increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
31Number of adults assuming new/expanded leadership roles in the community
3Number of youth increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
2Number of youth assuming new/expanded leadership roles in the community
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Youth and adults will address community issues and/or challenges through volunteerism.

Value* Outcome Description
5Number of adult participants acquiring the skills needed to serve as a volunteer
3Number of youth participants reporting aspirations to serve in new or expanded volunteer roles in community
2Number of adult participants reporting aspirations to serve in new or expanded volunteer roles in community
38Number of hours adult volunteer training conducted
5Number of hours youth volunteer training conducted
5Number new volunteers recruited
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
300Increased number of hours contributed by trained adult volunteers
2Number of adult volunteers serving in new or expanded roles within Extension
1Number of adult volunteers serving in new or expanded roles beyond Extension, including community boards and task forces
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Futures that Work: School to Career Pathways

Value* Outcome Description
26Number of teachers trained in 4-H STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) curriculum
1394Number of youth (students) increasing knowledge in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math)
808Total number of female participants in STEM program
70Number of high school age youth (students) participating as members of 4-H clubs
15Number of youth (students) increasing knowledge of career/employability skills
2Number of adults increasing knowledge of career/employability skills
2Number of youth (students) increasing knowledge of entrepreneurship
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
38Number of teachers using 4-H STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) curriculum in their classrooms
1394Number of youth (students) gaining knowledge in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math)
10Number of youth (students) gaining career / employability skills
2Number of adults gaining career / employability skills
2Number of youth (students) gaining entrepreneurship skills
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

North Carolinians will make decisions and adopt practices that implement effective resource protection and conservation.

Value* Outcome Description
12Number of participants increasing their knowledge about best management practices
14Number of youth and adults demonstrating increased knowledge of natural resources and environmental issues
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
1Number of participants that adopted recommended climate mitigation practices such as water-use efficiency, livestock production feeding practices, carbon sequestration, reducing carbon or energy footprint.
54Number of acres under recommended climate mitigation practices such as water-use efficiency, livestock production feeding practices, carbon sequestration, reducing carbon or energy footprint.
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Consumers and communities will enhance the value of plants, animals, and landscapes while conserving valuable natural resources and protecting the environment.

Value* Outcome Description
82Number of participants improving knowledge, attitude, skills and aspirations regarding gardening and landscape practices including plant selection and placement, turfgrass management, soil management, growing food, water conservation and water quality preservation, storm water and erosion management, green waste management, pest and wildlife management
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
45Number of participants selecting appropriate landscape plants (adapted, drought tolerant, appropriate size, etc.)
12Number of participants adopting composting
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Youth and adult program participants will make healthy food choices, achieve the recommended amount of physical activity and reduce risk factors for chronic diseases.

Value* Impact Description
46Number of adults increasing their fruit and vegetables consumption
79Number of youth increasing their fruit and vegetable consumption
112Number of participants increasing their physical activity
33Number of participants reducing their BMI
39Number of adults who reduce their blood pressure
20Number of adults who improve their blood glucose (A1c.)level
33Number of adults who reduce their total cholesterol
39Number of participants who consume less sodium in their diet
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

IV. Number of Contacts Made by Extension

Type of ContactNumber
Face-to-face* 13,867
Non face-to-face** 16,445
Total by Extension staff in 2017 30,312
* Face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make directly with individuals through one-on-one visits, meetings, and other activities where staff members work directly with individuals.
** Non face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make indirectly with individuals by telephone, email, newsletters, news articles, radio, television, and other means.

V. Designated Grants Received by Extension

Type of GrantAmount
Contracts/Grants $0.00
Gifts/Donations $30,390.10
In-Kind Grants/Donations $200.00
United Way/Foundations $6,970.00
User Fees $0.00
Total $37,560.10

VI. Volunteer Involvement in Extension Programs

Number of Volunteers* Number of Volunteer Hours Known client contacts by volunteers Dollar Value at 24.69
4-H: 378 2,896 1,082 $ 71,502.00
Advisory Leadership System: 36 23 50 $ 568.00
Extension Community Association: 0 0 0 $ 0.00
Extension Master Gardener: 22 1,788 212 $ 44,146.00
Other: 56 123 265 $ 3,037.00
Total: 492 4830 1609 $ 119,253.00
* The number of volunteers reflects the overall number of volunteers for multiple events.

VII. Membership of Advisory Leadership System

Advisory Leadership Council
Marissa Brzenski, Chair
Lynn Yokley, Secretary
Don Brown
Larry Campbell
Mark Hancock
Eddie Leagans
Mark Robertson
Roy Swisher
Gail Waldman
Henry Walker
Sarah Wood
Elizabeth Bourne, Youth Representative
Beth Dixon, MG Representative
Mary Nell Richie, ECA Representative
Richard Poindexter, Davie County Commissioner
4-H Livestock Committee
Tommy Shore, President
Bud Martin, Vice-President
Judy Wilson, Treasurer
Jennie Rucker, Secrectary
Allen Brown
Kathryn Brown
Teresa Cummings
Eunice Gonzalez
Rodolfo Gonzalez
Doug Hefner
Jennifer Hefner
Ricky Karriker
Cindy Karriker
Lori Martin
Ruth Matthews
Carl Matthews
Lisa Pilcher
Reggie Pilcher
Leah Thomas, Youth Representative
Paul Ratledge
Josh Sell
Cathy Shore
Glen Staebner
Leanne Thomas
Mark Thomas
Maurice Walker
Sandra Walker
Ashley Wilbanks
Rick Wilson
Lynn Yokley
Josh & Kristen Williams
Master Gardener Organization
Annette Walters, President
Laura Martin, Past President
Terry Thornett, Vice President
Brenda Davis, Secretary
Frank Foster, Treasurer
Beth Dixon, ALC Representative
Rebekah Brown, State EMGVA Representative
Larry Campbell, Website Administrator
4-H and Youth Advisory Committee
Mary Nell Richie, Chair
Abbie Barbour
Paula Bourne
Melani Harree
Lynne Hicks
Merit Kirkpatrick
Eddie Leagans
Karen Smith
Jeep Wilson
Sarah Wood
Lynn Yokley
Davie County Agricultural Advisory Board
Lynn Yokley, Chair
Steve McMahan, Vice Chair
Wade Dyson
Eddie Leagans
Barry Nichols
Henry Walker
Andrew Meadwell, ex officio
Ryan Searcy, ex officio
Frankie Singlton, ex officio

Landscape & Turf Advisory Committee
Brian Andrews
James Blakley
Michael Hunter
Mike Stegall
ECA County Council
Jeanne Gilbreth, President
Doris Jones, Vice-President
Linda Owings, Secretary
Margaret Shew, Treasurer
LaTeah Dunn, Cultural Arts Coordinator
Joan Cress
Gail Jordan
Mary Nell Richie
Brenda Rutherford
Davie County Cattlemen Board of Directors
Eddie Leagans, President
Roy Swisher, Vice-President
Wade Dyson, Secretary/Treasurer
Jeff Smith, Past President
Gerald Chaffin
Mark Hancock
Joe Shamel Sonny Stroud
Henry Walker

VIII. Staff Membership

Colleen Church
Title: County Extension Director, Davie County
Phone: (336) 753-6100
Email: colleen_church@ncsu.edu

Brent Buchanan
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Dairy
Phone: (315) 212-1277
Email: babuchan@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Dairy Extension Programming in Western North Carolina Counties of Haywood, Madison, Buncombe, Transylvania, Henderson, Yancey, McDowell, Polk, Rutherford, Mitchell, Avery, Burke, Cleveland, Watauga, Caldwell, Catawba, Lincoln, Gaston, Ashe, Wilkes, Alexander, Iredell, Alleghany, Surry, Yadkin, and Davie.

Lisa Crowder
Title: County Extension Support Specialist
Phone: (336) 753-6100
Email: lisa_crowder@ncsu.edu

Hannah Elmore
Title: Extension Agent, 4-H Youth Development
Phone: (336) 753-6100
Email: hannah_elmore@ncsu.edu

Lauren Greene
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Poultry
Phone: (336) 651-7347
Email: lauren_greene@ncsu.edu

Marissa Herchler
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Animal Food Safety (FSMA Programs)
Phone: (919) 515-5396
Email: marissa_herchler@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Marissa is an Area Specialized Agent for animal food safety, with emphasis on the new Food Safety Modernization Act rules, as they apply to feed mills in North Carolina. Please contact Marissa with any FSMA related questions, or PCQI training inquiries.

Pam Jones
Title: Area Agent, Agriculture - Horticulture
Phone: (336) 753-6100
Email: pam_jones@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Responsibilities include: Consumer Horticulture, Master Gardener Coordinator, Pesticide Education Coordinator, Commercial Horticulture.

Stacey Jones
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Commercial Nursery and Greenhouse
Phone: (704) 920-3310
Email: stacey_jones@ncsu.edu

Bill Lord
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Water Resources
Phone: (919) 496-3344
Email: william_lord@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Water quality education and technical assistance

Craig Mauney
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Commercial Vegetables & Fruits
Phone: (828) 684-3562
Email: craig_mauney@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provides educational opportunities, training and technical support to commercial fruit and vegetable growers, agents, and industry in Western NC.

Rachel McDowell
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Consumer and Retail Food Safety
Phone: (919) 515-9155
Email: romcdowe@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Support FCS Agents in delivering timely and evidence-based food safety education and information to stakeholders in NC.

Marsha McGraw
Title: Area Agent, Agriculture - Field Crops
Phone: (336) 753-6100
Email: mlmcgraw@ncsu.edu

Currey Nobles
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Food Safety
Phone: (919) 515-9520
Email: canobles@ncsu.edu

Karen Robertson
Title: County Extension Administrative Assistant
Phone: (336) 753-6100
Email: karen_robertson@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Administrative and Agriculture Secretary, Safety Chair for the County.

Elena Rogers
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Food Safety - Fresh Produce Western NC
Phone: (828) 352-2519
Email: elena_rogers@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provide educational programs, training and technical support focusing on fresh produce safety to Agents and growers in Western NC.

Phil Rucker
Title: Area Agent, Agriculture - Livestock
Phone: (336) 753-6100
Email: phil_rucker@ncsu.edu

Mitch Woodward
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Watersheds and Water Quality
Phone: (919) 250-1112
Email: mdwoodwa@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: NC Cooperative Extension's Goals include: - NC's natural resources and environmental quality will be protected, conserved and enhanced. - NC will have profitable, environmentally sustainable plant, animal and food systems. Protecting our environmental resources, particularly drinking water quality, is a top priority in NC. NC Cooperative Extension is a leader in teaching, researching, and accelerating the adoption of effective water quality protection practices.

IX. Contact Information

Davie County Center
180 S Main St
Mocksville, NC 27028

Phone: (336) 753-6100
Fax: (336) 751-1184
URL: http://davie.ces.ncsu.edu