2017 Edgecombe County Program Impact Report

Approved: January 21, 2018

I. Executive Summary

The Cooperative Extension program in Edgecombe County connects the resources and knowledge of our state's land-grant universities to people in our county through informal educational opportunities. Our efforts are guided by the needs and issues identified in the county and our staff develop programs to address those critical needs with the resources available.

Our Extension Center conducted 101 meetings, demonstrations, workshops and field days providing 900 contact hours reaching 3,302 participants. Additional contacts of our staff reached another 17,990 people in personal contacts with another 15,104 contacts through phone calls or e-mail. Program impacts created a value of $879,205 to the clients we serve. These impacts were made possible by 779 volunteers who devoted time valued at $177,236 to broaden the outreach of programming.

4-H provides a solid foundation for educational excellence, building character, and developing leadership for 745 youth in Edgecombe County, most notable in this are the efforts to address STEM initiatives. The Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP) reaches out to families and youth improving their diet, nutrition, physical activity and resource management in planning meals. The Community & Rural Development program continues to enhance the leadership capacity of two local organizations implementing their strategic plan, developing opportunities for older youth to develop their leadership skills and continues to work with the County’s tourism efforts.

Twenty eight Master Gardeners are active in conducting educational programs providing 2,500 hours of programming for youth and adults with a resulting value of $60,350 for their services rendered. Agriculture continues to be a solid segment of the economy in the county and farmers have adapted to the production of new crops becoming particularly successful with clary sage in addition to expanded acres of sweet potatoes to diversify operations and have adjusted crop acreages to take advantage of crops with higher prices. Edgecombe County experienced a more successful growing season compared to the previous two years. Educational programming has provided a benefit of $789,130 in additional income and improved practices for field crop producers and livestock production in the county.

Programs and educational efforts of the Edgecombe Extension Center help to leverage the use of $33,407 from grants and donations for the benefit of the county. Cooperative Extension has continued to work with the Edgecombe Soil & Water Conservation District and the Edgecombe Agricultural Advisory Board to implement the county's Agricultural Development Plan.

The impacts documented in this report reflect the dedication of our staff and tireless efforts of volunteers in addition to the numerous collaborating groups and organizations working to improve the lives of Edgecombe County citizens. We do want to recognize the efforts of staff members who have moved on to other positions; Colby Griffin (Horticulture Extension Agent), Jayne McBurney (Family & Consumer Sciences Agent), Brittany Jenkins (EFNEP Program Assistant, and Jamilla Hawkins (Community and Rural Development Agent).

II. County Background

Edgecombe County is located in the northern Coastal Plains. It has a land area of 327,040 acres or 511 square miles. Ninety percent of the land is in woodlands and fields, each accounting for about 50% of the undeveloped property. Our county is considered a low wealth, Tier I county with the second highest property tax rate in North Carolina and a high medicaid burden. Edgecombe County's statistics for health, income, education, work force, jobs and poverty paint a bleak picture, however, our citizens have an immense pride, friendliness and resourcefulness. The county did manage to produce a positive population growth in the latest census, but we continue to feel the effects of the decline of textiles and manufacturing which has been the foundation for employment and taxes. Opportunities rise occasionally to fill these voids with expansions of current local industries and the anticipated CSX Intermodal Complex should stimulate further opportunities.

In spite of many negatives, residents continue to find ways to persevere and make Edgecombe County a great place to work and live. The county has nearly complete coverage for public water service, two public sewer systems, and is directing an effort to coordinate tourism opportunities in the county. Hurricane Matthew dealt a setback to the county and homeowners and businesses will be recovering from the lingering effects for several years.

In order for our Extension Center to plan and deliver meaningful, pertinent and life changing programs we conducted an environmental scan representing all walks of life, including nontraditional clientele. We divided the needs, priorities and concerns into two different groups, those that our Center could address that was within our "Mission" and those we could not based on the resources available to us. We then shared our findings with our Extension Advisory Council. They provided further, objective direction based on their insight of our Center's staff and strengths while adding their knowledge of the different segments of the community.

The issues and priorities selected for our programming efforts were chosen based on "high urgency" and "high importance". The following represent the findings: 1) Improving Health and Nutrition 2) Increasing Leadership, Personal Development and Citizenship Skills 3) Increasing Economic Opportunity and Business Development 4) Increasing Educational Achievement and Excellence 5) Improving the Agricultural and Food Supply System in North Carolina 6) Environmental Stewardship 7) Natural Resource management.

Many of the identified issues for Cooperative Extension have also been cited as significant by Edgecombe County Government. Cooperative Extension, County Government, NCSU Specialists and NCSU students developed a tourism plan specifically for Edgecombe County. Edgecombe County holds a broad range of tourism opportunities from little-known to statewide attractions. Extension will take an active role in building tourism capacity in the county. A Tourism Development Authority has been established with the county and Town of Tarboro. Extension has played an integral part in facilitating sessions focused on creating a vision, mission, and goals for the group. Extension is providing leadership to protect natural resources and rural heritage in working with the Agricultural Advisory Board on the Voluntary/Enhanced Voluntary Agricultural District. County Commissioners adopted a customized Agricultural Development Plan which serves as a plan of work for the Agricultural Advisory Board along with recommendations which are aimed at enhancing agricultural enterprises and preserving working lands. Agriculture has remained a steady foundation of economic enterprise in the county providing over 19% of total income while providing 15.4% of county employment. However, 2017 will present a very challenging year for many growers due to disappointing crops in the past two growing season, continued low commodity prices and further cuts in tobacco contracts.

Our Extension Center will continue to help protect our water resources by certifying farmers in proper pesticide usage, land application of animal and municipal waste and nutrient management particularly as new poultry operations provide alternative sources of revenue for county farmers. Extension will work closely with local governments to increase access for local farmers to sell farm products and increasing horticultural activities.

Cooperative Extension offers other programs that address the well-being of citizens, benefiting our county’s quality of life and ultimately our ability to recruit industry. Education focusing on nutrition and health for youth and adults will address the problem of overweight and obesity, leading to a reduction in chronic disease and health care costs. A grant from CDC will place a Program Associate in the county to coordinate and deliver Health Matters programming to specifically address these issues. Newly developing programs will also enhance food security and safety. The Edgecombe 4-H and youth development program will continue to address important concerns, such as character issues, self-esteem, decision making and leadership development. We work very closely with county government on many other things such as disaster preparation, developing leadership capacity and reinvigorating rural development.

III. Objectives to Address the Cooperative Extension Long Range Plan

North Carolina's plant production systems will become more profitable and sustainable.

Value* Outcome Description
87Number of crop (all plant systems) producers increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, and/or skills as related to: 1. Best management production practices (cultural, nutrient, and genetics) 2. Pest/insect, disease, weed, wildlife management 3. Financial/Farm management tools and practices (business, marketing, government policy, human resources) 4. Alternative agriculture, bioenergy, and value-added enterprises
2Number of Extension initiated and controlled County demonstration test sites (new required for GLF/PSI reporting)
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
63Number of crop (all plant systems) producers adopting best management practices, including those practices related to nutrient management, conservation, production, cultivars, pest management (weeds, diseases, insects), business management, and marketing
785000Net income gains realized by the adoption of best management practices, including those practices related to nutrient management, conservation, production, cultivars, pest management (weeds, diseases, insects), business management, and marketing
45Number of producers reporting increased dollar returns per acre or reduced costs per acre
75000Number of acres in conservation tillage or other Best Management Practice
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

North Carolina's animal production systems will become more profitable and sustainable.

Value* Outcome Description
15Number of animal producers increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, and/or skills as related to: 1. Best management production practices (cultural, nutrient, and genetics) 2. Pest/insect, disease, weed, wildlife management 3. Financial/Farm management tools and practices (business, marketing, government policy, human resources) 4. Alternative agriculture, bioenergy, and value-added enterprises
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
0Number of animal producers adopting Extension-recommended best management practices, including those practices related to husbandry, improved planning, marketing, and financial practices
4130Net income gains by producers adopting Extension-recommended best management practices, including those practices related to husbandry, improved planning, marketing, and financial practices
10Number of waste management certifications gained or maintained due to Extension education efforts
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Producers will increase sales of food locally to more agriculturally aware consumers through market development, producer and consumer education, and new farmer and infrastructure support.

Value* Outcome Description
14Number of producers who gain skills or knowledge to increase production for local markets.
14Number of adults (including producers, food business owners, etc.) who improved knowledge of local food and agricultural systems.
6Number of children/youth who improved knowledge of local food and agricultural systems.
14Number of individuals who gain knowledge or acquire skills related to vegetable/fruit gardening, and if also reporting under Urban and Consumer Agriculture Objective, divide up the reported number appropriately between the two objectives to avoid duplication.
14Number of producers who improve local food marketing skills or knowledge.
14Number of individuals who learn how to prepare local foods, including through use of home food preservation techniques.
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
2Number of new and existing access points for consumers that expand or improve their offering of local fruits and vegetables. Access points include farmers markets, retail stores, school food programs, community gardens, institutions other than schools (e.g. hospitals, universities, etc.), and other systems/access points not noted (e.g. restaurants, etc.).
14Number of producers selling their agricultural products to local markets (direct, intermediated/food service, institutional) for consumption in NC.
14Number of producers who diversified their marketing strategies into local markets (direct, intermediated/food service, institutional).
6000Gross sales of local foods by producers. (Increase in gross sales to be calculated at the state level.)
14Number of producers (and other members of the local food supply chain) who have increased revenue.
4Number of new farms (beginning farmers) selling into local markets for local consumption (in this reporting period).
2Number of individuals who grow food in community gardens.
8Number of youth who grow food in school gardens.
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Agricultural producers, workers, food handlers and consumers will adopt safer food and agricultural production, handling, and distribution practices that reduce workplace and home injuries/illnesses, enhance food security, and increase the quality and safety of food that North Carolinians prepare and consume.

Individuals and groups will acquire leadership and decision making capacities needed to guide and actively participate in local and state organizations.

Value* Outcome Description
39Number of adults increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
17Number of adults assuming new/expanded leadership roles in the community
65Number of youth increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
50Number of youth assuming new/expanded leadership roles in the community
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
14Number of adults increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
14Number of adults assuming new/expanded leadership roles in the community
65Number of youth increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
50Number of youth assuming new/expanded leadership roles in the community
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Youth and adults will address community issues and/or challenges through volunteerism.

Value* Outcome Description
28Number of adult participants acquiring the skills needed to serve as a volunteer
15Number of youth participants reporting aspirations to serve in new or expanded volunteer roles in community
28Number of adult participants reporting aspirations to serve in new or expanded volunteer roles in community
15Number of hours adult volunteer training conducted
25Number of hours youth volunteer training conducted
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
3500Increased number of hours contributed by trained adult volunteers
15Number of youth volunteers serving in new or expanded roles within Extension
1Number of adult volunteers serving in new or expanded roles within Extension
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Community members, organizations and local government will engage in collaborative dialog and decision-making to build economically, socially and environmentally resilient communities. This will be done through inclusive engagement, partnership building, and/or community planning.

Parents and caregivers will effectively use recommended parenting, self care practices and community resources.

Adults and youth will apply financial management practices to increase their economic security, which include to: meet basic necessities, increase savings, reduce debt, and build long-term assets.

Futures that Work: School to Career Pathways

Value* Outcome Description
91Number of teachers trained in 4-H STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) curriculum
2837Number of youth (students) increasing knowledge in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math)
1570Total number of female participants in STEM program
39Number of high school age youth (students) participating as members of 4-H clubs
119Number of youth (students) increasing knowledge of career/employability skills
56Number of adults increasing knowledge of career/employability skills
15Number of youth (students) increasing knowledge of entrepreneurship
1Number of adults increasing knowledge of entrepreneurship
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
45Number of teachers using 4-H STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) curriculum in their classrooms
1546Number of youth (students) gaining knowledge in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math)
44Number of youth (students) gaining career / employability skills
56Number of adults gaining career / employability skills
38Number of youth (students) gaining entrepreneurship skills
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

North Carolinians will make decisions and adopt practices that implement effective resource protection and conservation.

Value* Outcome Description
14Number of participants increasing their knowledge about best management practices
66Number of youth and adults demonstrating increased knowledge of natural resources and environmental issues
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Consumers and communities will enhance the value of plants, animals, and landscapes while conserving valuable natural resources and protecting the environment.

Value* Outcome Description
33Number of participants improving knowledge, attitude, skills and aspirations regarding gardening and landscape practices including plant selection and placement, turfgrass management, soil management, growing food, water conservation and water quality preservation, storm water and erosion management, green waste management, pest and wildlife management
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
33Number of participants who use extension-recommended best management practices in landscapes, turf, and gardens, including pest (insect, weed, disease) management, fertility management, water conservation, water quality preservation and pruning techniques
1155Total cost savings from the use of extension-recommended best management practices in landscapes, turf, and gardens, including pest (insect, weed, disease) management, fertility management, water conservation, water quality preservation and pruning techniques
33Number of participants who use extension-recommended pest management practices in homes, public facilities, businesses or in community pest management programs
990Cost savings from using extension-recommended pest management practices in homes, public facilities, businesses or in community pest management programs
33Number of participants selecting appropriate landscape plants (adapted, drought tolerant, appropriate size, etc.)
825Cost savings from the appropriate selection of landscape plants
33Number of participants growing food for home consumption
3300Value of produce grown for home consumption
33Number of participants adopting composting
33Number of participants implementing extension-recommended practices to conserve water use and protect water qualty
2805Costs savings from implementing extension-recommended practices to conserve water use and protect water qualtiy
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Youth and adult program participants will make healthy food choices, achieve the recommended amount of physical activity and reduce risk factors for chronic diseases.

IV. Number of Contacts Made by Extension

Type of ContactNumber
Face-to-face* 17,990
Non face-to-face** 15,104
Total by Extension staff in 2017 33,094
* Face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make directly with individuals through one-on-one visits, meetings, and other activities where staff members work directly with individuals.
** Non face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make indirectly with individuals by telephone, email, newsletters, news articles, radio, television, and other means.

V. Designated Grants Received by Extension

Type of GrantAmount
Contracts/Grants $8,000.00
Gifts/Donations $20,382.62
In-Kind Grants/Donations $2,925.00
United Way/Foundations $0.00
User Fees $2,100.00
Total $33,407.62

VI. Volunteer Involvement in Extension Programs

Number of Volunteers* Number of Volunteer Hours Known client contacts by volunteers Dollar Value at 24.69
4-H: 649 2,625 4,937 $ 64,811.00
Advisory Leadership System: 0 0 0 $ 0.00
Extension Community Association: 0 0 0 $ 0.00
Extension Master Gardener: 28 2,500 4,000 $ 61,725.00
Other: 102 2,217 3,000 $ 54,738.00
Total: 779 7342 11937 $ 181,274.00
* The number of volunteers reflects the overall number of volunteers for multiple events.

VII. Membership of Advisory Leadership System

Advisory Council
Alton Skinner
Jackie Heath
Barbara Campbell Davis
Jack Rich
Scott Kiser
Mar Lou Coker
Don Anderson
Gloria Moseley
Dean Odham
Dorothy Davis
Don Caudle
Gwen Pitt
Eric Evans
Troy Lewis
Deborah Coley
Agricultural Advisory Board
Tom Porter- Chairman
Don Anderson
Renee Long
Fred Hampton
Paul Drake
Ben Shelton
John R Grimes
Alton Skinner
Shane Varnell
Vernon Rhodes, III
Forestry Specialized Committee
Bill Purvis
Fred Hampton
Mike Wittig
Jack Rich
Kenny Johnson
Livestock Specialized Committee
Jeff Lancaster
Paul Drake
Dean Odom
Rick Fulford
Dr. Cole Younger, DVM
Alton Skinner
Scott Kiser
Beekeepers
Jerry Flanagan
Berry Hines
Joe Powell
Jane Williams
George Alma Edwards
4-H & Youth Committee
Janet Bradley
Jeffrey Bradley
Steven Bradley
Johnica Ellis
Emily Hill
Rell Killebrew
Mallory Lancaster
Melissa Lancaster
Caley Mayo
Ayra Sundbom
Hailee Whitehurst
4-H Livestock Show Committee
Amanda Evans
Tommy Evans
Anna Greco
Scott Kiser
Ayra Sundbom
Ross Whitehurst
Hailee Whitehurst
Farmers Market Committee
Edgecombe Master Gardener Volunteers Committee
Jim Taylor
Kim Page
Lynn Brady
Ruby Anderson
Field Crops Committee
Kenny Johnson
Paul Drake
Don Anderson
Norris Harrell
Bert Pitt
Bobby Norris
Gary Hyman
Henry Phillips
Silas Smith
Bobby Webb
Roger Grimes
Jeff Lancaster
Hunter Quincy

VIII. Staff Membership

Art Bradley
Title: County Extension Director
Phone: (252) 641-7815
Email: art_bradley@ncsu.edu

Daniel Campeau
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Poultry
Phone: (919) 542-8202
Email: dan_campeau@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Work mainly with Commercial Poultry industry. I also work with small scale poultry production. Service area is now the North Central District from Guilford to Halifax with the southern edge being Chatham and Wake county respectively.

Susan Chase
Title: Regional Nutrition Extension Associate - Northeast EFNEP and SNAP-Ed
Phone: (252) 902-1700
Email: susan_chase@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Job Description: Provides programmatic supervision to the EFNEP program in the Northeast District

Natema Drummond
Title: Nutrition Program Assistant, EFNEP - Youth & Adult Nutrition Education
Phone: (252) 641-7821
Email: nsdrummo@ncsu.edu

Erin Eure
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Commercial Fruits & Vegetables
Phone: (252) 357-1400
Email: erin_eure@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provides educational opportunities and technical support to commercial fruit and vegetable growers, agents, and industry in northeastern NC.

Steve Gabel
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Aquaculture
Phone: (252) 482-6585
Email: steve_gabel@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Responsible for aquaculture educational programs for the NC NE extension district.

Tanya Heath
Title: Extension Agent, 4-H Youth Development
Phone: (252) 641-7821
Email: tanya_heath@ncsu.edu

Marissa Herchler
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Animal Food Safety (FSMA Programs)
Phone: (919) 515-5396
Email: marissa_herchler@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Marissa is an Area Specialized Agent for animal food safety, with emphasis on the new Food Safety Modernization Act rules, as they apply to feed mills in North Carolina. Please contact Marissa with any FSMA related questions, or PCQI training inquiries.

Lynette Johnston
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Food Safety
Phone: (919) 515-0303
Email: lynette_johnston@ncsu.edu

Shoneca Kent
Title: Extension Agent, Community and Rural Development
Phone: (252) 641-7821
Email: sekent@ncat.edu

Colby Lambert
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Forestry
Phone: (910) 814-6041
Email: colby_lambert@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provides educational opportunities and technical support to forest landowners, agents, and forest industry in eastern North Carolina.

Danny Lauderdale
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Nursery and Greenhouse, Eastern Region
Phone: (252) 237-0111
Email: danny_lauderdale@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provides programming to commercial ornamental nursery and greenhouse producers in eastern North Carolina.

Kelsey Lichtenwalner
Title: Extension Agent, Agriculture - Livestock
Phone: (252) 641-7827
Email: kelsey_lichtenwalner@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Responsible for helping farmers start, manage, grow, and improve their herd and/or farm, as well as educating the community about Agriculture.

Bill Lord
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Water Resources
Phone: (919) 496-3344
Email: william_lord@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Water quality education and technical assistance

Gloria Morning
Title: County Extension Administrative Assistant
Phone: (252) 641-7821
Email: gloria_morning@ncsu.edu

Regina Moseley
Title: Extension Agent, Family and Consumer Sciences
Phone: (252) 459-9810
Email: regina_moseley@ncsu.edu

Yvonne Murphy
Title: Health Matters Associate
Phone: (252) 641-7821
Email: yvonne_murphy@ncsu.edu

Chip Simmons
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Food Safety
Phone: (919) 414-5632
Email: odsimmon@ncsu.edu

Debbie Stroud
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Consumer and Retail Food Safety
Phone: (919) 515-9149
Email: dlstroud@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Area Specialized Agents in Consumer and Retail Food Safety help to ensure that Family and Consumer Sciences (FCS) Agents have access to timely, evidence-based food safety information. This is accomplished by (1) working with FCS Agents in their counties, (2) developing food safety materials and (3) planning and implementing a NC Safe Plates Food Safety Info Center.

Spencer Thomas
Title: Extension Agent, Agriculture - Horticulture, Beekeeping and Forestry
Phone: (252) 641-7815
Email: spencer_thomas@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Responsibilities include Consumer and Commercial Horticulture, Beekeeping, Forestry, and the Extension Master Gardener Program.

Scott Tilley
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Field Crops
Phone: (252) 793-4428
Email: scott_tilley@ncsu.edu

Misty Varnell
Title: 4-H Program Assistant, 4-H Youth Development
Phone: (252) 641-7827
Email: misty_varnell@ncsu.edu

Mitch Woodward
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Watersheds and Water Quality
Phone: (919) 250-1112
Email: mdwoodwa@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: NC Cooperative Extension's Goals include: - NC's natural resources and environmental quality will be protected, conserved and enhanced. - NC will have profitable, environmentally sustainable plant, animal and food systems. Protecting our environmental resources, particularly drinking water quality, is a top priority in NC. NC Cooperative Extension is a leader in teaching, researching, and accelerating the adoption of effective water quality protection practices.

IX. Contact Information

Edgecombe County Center
201 Saint Andrew St
Tarboro, NC 27886

Phone: (252) 641-7827
Fax: (252) 641-7831
URL: http://edgecombe.ces.ncsu.edu