2017 Forsyth County Program Impact Report

Approved: January 22, 2018

I. Executive Summary

Forsyth County Cooperative Extension’s mission is to intentionally engage community members through educational programs and technological avenues to improve the quality of their lives. We strive to address community issues through research-based education and practical solutions that enrich the lives, land and economy of our residents. Preserving agriculture and farmland in the county, developing a vibrant local foods economy, promoting opportunities for new and transitioning growers, improving access to nutritious, local foods and providing 4-H youth development opportunities have been a priority for Cooperative Extension during the past year. We strive to create collaborations with multiple organizations providing opportunities for community members to serve on numerous committees, action teams and boards. We work with growers, entrepreneurs, county organizations, youth and families, businesses and key community members to address grass-roots issues resulting in:

● 1835 adults increased their knowledge of local food and agricultural systems in Forsyth County.
● 71 people increased their knowledge involving Natural Resources best practices through events, such as, Creek Week and Treasure Tree.
● Over 200 tobacco/vegetable producers were trained on Good Agricultural Practices.
● The Piedmont Regional Cattlemen's Conference and Sheep/Goat Field Day workshops provided new concepts and management that assisted 143 producers with increasing profits, stating that information learned from Cooperative Extension could make or save them money on their farm.
● 12 new community gardens were established, including eight in limited resource communities bringing the county total to 170 active gardens.
● 64 trained Community Garden Mentors provided support to 58 gardens, helping to build leadership capacity and promote best horticultural practices for increased yields.
● 478 people participated in or learned about soil testing and cover cropping through Community Gardens.
● 530 pesticide applicators were trained on pesticide safety, pest management and environmental safety.
● 9,079 county residents were trained in gardening and landscape practices, including plant selection and placement, turf grass management, soil management, growing food, water conservation and quality, storm-water and erosion management, composting and pest and wildlife management.

4-H youth development incorporates the Essential Elements of Positive Youth Development in all program areas teaching youth how to be positive, capable and contributing adults for the future. In the past year, 4-H programming has helped 4,097 youth learn appropriate communication techniques, gain knowledge of employability skills, increase awareness of potential career paths, improve critical thinking skills and goal setting. In order to increase student’s interest in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM), numerous opportunities for hands-on, experiential learning were provided to 4,820 students. Community service is also a critical component of the 4-H experience teaching youth empathy and the value of service to others. In 2017, Forsyth 4-H’ers provided 2,078 hours of community service, a volunteer value of $50,163.

Cooperative Extension programs assisted 452 citizens to gain knowledge of basic financial management tools (budgeting, record keeping, goal setting) and 279 limited income individuals have developed a written household budget for the first time. 508 people increased knowledge related to lowering energy costs for home and business use. Additionally, 230 people increased awareness of community resources with 40 individuals demonstrating a new life skill, such as, goal setting or self-care. Youth and adult EFNEP recipients included 743 people who learned new food strategies to increase their quality of life.

Cooperative Extension is proud of the strong partnership between Forsyth County, NC State University and NC A&T State University and the expanded outreach of our educational programs made possible through outside funding (grants, donations, in-kind support) of over $100,000. Volunteers (Master Gardeners, Garden Mentors, 4-H leaders, Extension and Community Association members) are critical to Extension's mission. During the past year, Extension volunteers provided 38,921 hours of volunteer service valued at $24.14/hour amounting to an economic benefit to Forsyth County residents of $959,874 for volunteer service.

II. County Background

Cooperative Extension is committed to partnering with communities to deliver education and technology that enrich the lives, land and economy of Forsyth County citizens. Forsyth County is the 4th largest county in North Carolina with a population of 354,952. Winston-Salem is the largest city in the county, 4th largest in the state, accounting for 65.5% of the county population. The population is diverse with 68.1% white, 27.1% black, 2.0% Asian, 0.8% American Indian or Alaska native, and 0.1% Hawaiian or Pacific Islander. There is 12.2% of the population who are of Hispanic or Latino origin

Although the county is one of the most urban in the state, agriculture and maintaining some rural character is valued. There are 662 farms and over 40,000 acres of farmland in the county. The Forsyth County Farmland Protection Plan: Growing The Family Farm Economy and Conserving Rural Character was completed in 2016. The plan provides 41 recommendations covering five areas: Promoting Sustainable Growth, Agricultural Economic Development, Farm Transition and the Next Generation, Education and Public Outreach and Forestry Opportunities. Cooperative Extension will collaborate with growers, farm organizations, community groups, government agencies, etc. to address specific recommendations from the plan. Developing more profitable farms is the most effective means of preserving agricultural lands in the county.

Small farmer, part-time opportunities are growing and becoming increasingly important as a supplemental income for the preservation of small agricultural lands in Forsyth County. Interest and demand in locally produced products is rapidly increasing. Economic development opportunities for growers, the need for agricultural processing infrastructure and strategies for addressing food insecurity and proper nutrition are important issues. Interest in gardening and especially community gardening has grown tremendously. Developing opportunities for youth gardening experiences will be emphasized during the coming year. Education of the large grounds maintenance industry as well as consumers is critical in establishing and maintaining proper, environmentally friendly horticulture practices.

Extension staff and the Advisory Leadership System made up of community leaders and volunteers continue to evaluate the data, resources available within and outside of Extension and prioritize the issues that Extension is best suited to address and could make an impact on in our county.

Prioritized issues are currently identified which include nutrition/obesity (both youth and adult); agriculture/horticulture sustainability including alternatives; environmental resource utilization including conservation, recycling, urban stormwater and farmland preservation; job readiness both youth and adult; agriculture/horticulture business management including diversification and value-added opportunities; and family well being and debt reduction including financial literacy and energy conservation. Emphasis on locally grown produce both consumer interest and education, grower education, marketing and infrastructure development continues to be an area of focus and supported by county and community leaders.

Cooperative Extension staff and a dedicated volunteer base are committed to partnering with growers, entrepreneurs, county organizations and communities to address these issues and improve the lives, land and economy for Forsyth County citizens.

III. Objectives to Address the Cooperative Extension Long Range Plan

North Carolina's plant production systems will become more profitable and sustainable.

Value* Outcome Description
37Number of crop (all plant systems) producers increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, and/or skills as related to: 1. Best management production practices (cultural, nutrient, and genetics) 2. Pest/insect, disease, weed, wildlife management 3. Financial/Farm management tools and practices (business, marketing, government policy, human resources) 4. Alternative agriculture, bioenergy, and value-added enterprises
2Number of Extension initiated and controlled County demonstration test sites (new required for GLF/PSI reporting)
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
24Number of crop (all plant systems) producers adopting best management practices, including those practices related to nutrient management, conservation, production, cultivars, pest management (weeds, diseases, insects), business management, and marketing
670820Net income gains realized by the adoption of best management practices, including those practices related to nutrient management, conservation, production, cultivars, pest management (weeds, diseases, insects), business management, and marketing
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

North Carolina's animal production systems will become more profitable and sustainable.

Value* Outcome Description
143Number of animal producers increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, and/or skills as related to: 1. Best management production practices (cultural, nutrient, and genetics) 2. Pest/insect, disease, weed, wildlife management 3. Financial/Farm management tools and practices (business, marketing, government policy, human resources) 4. Alternative agriculture, bioenergy, and value-added enterprises
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
29Number of animal producers adopting Extension-recommended best management practices, including those practices related to husbandry, improved planning, marketing, and financial practices
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Producers will increase sales of food locally to more agriculturally aware consumers through market development, producer and consumer education, and new farmer and infrastructure support.

Value* Outcome Description
37Number of producers who gain skills or knowledge to increase production for local markets.
1835Number of adults (including producers, food business owners, etc.) who improved knowledge of local food and agricultural systems.
1376Number of individuals who gain knowledge or acquire skills related to vegetable/fruit gardening, and if also reporting under Urban and Consumer Agriculture Objective, divide up the reported number appropriately between the two objectives to avoid duplication.
36Number of producers who improve local food marketing skills or knowledge.
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
6Number of new and existing access points for consumers that expand or improve their offering of local fruits and vegetables. Access points include farmers markets, retail stores, school food programs, community gardens, institutions other than schools (e.g. hospitals, universities, etc.), and other systems/access points not noted (e.g. restaurants, etc.).
36Number of producers selling their agricultural products to local markets (direct, intermediated/food service, institutional) for consumption in NC.
36Number of producers who diversified their marketing strategies into local markets (direct, intermediated/food service, institutional).
4Number of new farms (beginning farmers) selling into local markets for local consumption (in this reporting period).
170Number of individuals who begin home food production by starting a vegetable and/or fruit garden, and if also reporting under Urban and Consumer Horticulture Objective, divide up the reported number appropriately between the two objectives to avoid duplication.
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Agricultural producers, workers, food handlers and consumers will adopt safer food and agricultural production, handling, and distribution practices that reduce workplace and home injuries/illnesses, enhance food security, and increase the quality and safety of food that North Carolinians prepare and consume.

Value* Outcome Description
176Number of commercial/public operators trained
2Number of pesticide application credit hours provided
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Youth and adults will address community issues and/or challenges through volunteerism.

Parents and caregivers will effectively use recommended parenting, self care practices and community resources.

Value* Outcome Description
118Number of youth and adults increasing knowledge of life skills (such as goal setting, stress management, self-care and healthy relationships)
230Number of adults increasing their knowledge of community resources
79Number of adults and professionals increasing their knowledge of human development over the life course and emerging best practices in parenting and caregiving
25Number of parents and other caregivers of children increasing their knowledge of positive parenting practices (such as communication and discipline)
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
40Number of youth and adults using effective life skills (such as goal setting, stress management, self-care and healthy relationships)
117Number of adults increasing their use of identified community resources
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Adults and youth will apply financial management practices to increase their economic security, which include to: meet basic necessities, increase savings, reduce debt, and build long-term assets.

Value* Outcome Description
452Number of people gaining basic financial management knowledge and/or skills (such as; budgeting, record keeping, goal setting, writing goals, consumer decision-making)
374Number of people gaining knowledge and/or skills in managing financial products and financial identity (such as; credit, debt management, identify theft, credit reports and scores, scams, banking skills)
75Number of people gaining knowledge and/or skills to increase family assets (such as; home ownership, Individual Development Accounts (IDAs), estate planning (including Grandma’s Yellow Pie Plate), savings and investments, retirement planning)
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
279Number of people implementing basic financial management strategies (such as; developing a budget, keeping records, etc.)
40Number of people actively managing their financial accounts and financial identity (such as; obtaining credit reports, choosing among credit products, implementing identity theft safeguards, opening or selecting bank accounts, etc.)
22Number of people accessing financial products and programs recognized as vehicles for wealth accumulation
19Number of people accessing programs and implementing strategies to support family economic well-being
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Futures that Work: School to Career Pathways

Value* Outcome Description
46Number of teachers trained in 4-H STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) curriculum
4820Number of youth (students) increasing knowledge in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math)
1715Total number of female participants in STEM program
46Number of high school age youth (students) participating as members of 4-H clubs
152Number of youth (students) increasing knowledge of career/employability skills
6Number of adults increasing knowledge of career/employability skills
152Number of youth (students) increasing knowledge of entrepreneurship
6Number of adults increasing knowledge of entrepreneurship
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
40Number of teachers using 4-H STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) curriculum in their classrooms
4477Number of youth (students) gaining knowledge in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math)
152Number of youth (students) gaining career / employability skills
6Number of adults gaining career / employability skills
152Number of youth (students) gaining entrepreneurship skills
6Number of adults gaining entrepreneurship skills
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Consumers, communities, and organizations will become more efficient in their use of energy and increase their proportional use of renewable energy sources (wind/microhydro/solar/landfill gas/geothermal).

Value* Outcome Description
508Number of participants increasing knowledge in best management practices related to reducing energy use/increasing energy efficiency for homes, businesses, agricultural industries, or government
406Number of participants aspiring to conserve energy
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
295Number of participants engaging in best management practices related to reducing energy use/increasing energy efficiency for homes, businesses, agricultural industries, or government, such as installing insulation
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

North Carolinians will make decisions and adopt practices that implement effective resource protection and conservation.

Value* Outcome Description
71Number of participants increasing their knowledge about best management practices
1Number of child and youth educators aspiring to implement quality outdoor learning environments for children
66Number of youth and adults demonstrating increased knowledge of natural resources and environmental issues
4Number of youth willing to participate in conservation actions
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Consumers and communities will enhance the value of plants, animals, and landscapes while conserving valuable natural resources and protecting the environment.

Value* Outcome Description
2384Number of participants improving knowledge, attitude, skills and aspirations regarding gardening and landscape practices including plant selection and placement, turfgrass management, soil management, growing food, water conservation and water quality preservation, storm water and erosion management, green waste management, pest and wildlife management
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
1592Number of participants who use extension-recommended best management practices in landscapes, turf, and gardens, including pest (insect, weed, disease) management, fertility management, water conservation, water quality preservation and pruning techniques
16060Total cost savings from the use of extension-recommended best management practices in landscapes, turf, and gardens, including pest (insect, weed, disease) management, fertility management, water conservation, water quality preservation and pruning techniques
237Number of participants who use extension-recommended pest management practices in homes, public facilities, businesses or in community pest management programs
4740Cost savings from using extension-recommended pest management practices in homes, public facilities, businesses or in community pest management programs
740Number of participants selecting appropriate landscape plants (adapted, drought tolerant, appropriate size, etc.)
7520Cost savings from the appropriate selection of landscape plants
1117Number of participants growing food for home consumption
609Number of participants adopting composting
4Reduced tonnage of greenwaste as a result of Extension-recommended practices including composting and proper plant selection
767Number of participants implementing extension-recommended practices to conserve water use and protect water qualty
2160Costs savings from implementing extension-recommended practices to conserve water use and protect water qualtiy
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Youth and adult program participants will make healthy food choices, achieve the recommended amount of physical activity and reduce risk factors for chronic diseases.

Value* Impact Description
4Number of adults increasing their fruit and vegetables consumption
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

IV. Number of Contacts Made by Extension

Type of ContactNumber
Face-to-face* 12,885
Non face-to-face** 66,508
Total by Extension staff in 2017 79,393
* Face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make directly with individuals through one-on-one visits, meetings, and other activities where staff members work directly with individuals.
** Non face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make indirectly with individuals by telephone, email, newsletters, news articles, radio, television, and other means.

V. Designated Grants Received by Extension

Type of GrantAmount
Contracts/Grants $10,150.00
Gifts/Donations $60,674.00
In-Kind Grants/Donations $390.00
United Way/Foundations $71,340.00
User Fees $21,035.00
Total $163,589.00

VI. Volunteer Involvement in Extension Programs

Number of Volunteers* Number of Volunteer Hours Known client contacts by volunteers Dollar Value at 24.69
4-H: 719 3,888 3,706 $ 95,995.00
Advisory Leadership System: 46 96 177 $ 2,370.00
Extension Community Association: 199 28,328 4,082 $ 699,418.00
Extension Master Gardener: 2,301 9,848 464 $ 243,147.00
Other: 1,055 6,162 16,807 $ 152,140.00
Total: 4320 48322 25236 $ 1,193,070.00
* The number of volunteers reflects the overall number of volunteers for multiple events.

VII. Membership of Advisory Leadership System

Advisory Council
Marilyn Odom
Wes Carpenter
Claudia Whitaker
Edgar Miller
Dale Parker
Peggy Lyle
Joanetta McClain
Joycelyn Johnson
Vernon Switzer
Gloria Smith
Adam Pendlebury
Rev Francis Mann
Robert Jones
Toby Bost
BJ Hutchins
Charlette Lindell
Harriet McCarthy
Wilfredo Pagan
Tobacco/Field crops
Danny Boles
Bo Hall
Terry White
Kevin Brown
Steve Robertson
4-H Advisory Committee
Mae Lynn Joyce
Melinda Barrick
Carla Arrowood
Angie Redding
Rev Francis Manns
Claudette Goodwin
David Hooker
Rebekah May
Joe Baker
Mandie Rose
Master Gardener Advisory Committee
Harriet McCarthy
Steven Barnes
Mindy Mock
Teresa Lowry
Ann Williams
Carol Hart
Jeannie Leggett
Marcia Szewczyk
Rita Deck
Sheilah Lombardo
Doris Bennett
Patsy Cuthrell
Jane Harrell
Wallace Williamson
Mary Ann Beeson
Bill Crowley
Small Farms
Gary Owen
Vern Switzer
Terry Motsinger
Ellen Motsinger
Mike Tate
Ken Vanhoy
Natalie Sevin
Livingstone Flomeh-Mawutor
Al Hutchison
Linda Hutchison
Cheryl Ferguson
Ray Tuegel
Michael Banner
Brandon Williams
Gwen Winstead
Harvey Moser
Susan Moser
Mike Jacques
Pat Jacques
Arboretum
David Yount
Barbara Truehart
Rita Deck
Bill Deck
Jane Sandridge
April Akers
Linda Garwood Jones
Ann McLain
FCS / Human Services Committee
Charlette Lindell
Karen Forrest
Raymond Byrd
Portia Krone Walker
Kendra Davis
Marilyn Springs
Millie T. Davidson
Tim Rhodes
Forsyth Community Gardening
Reverend Francis Manns
Denise Adams
Ana Gonzalez
Wallace Williamson
Irma Jackson
Mark Cohn
Allen Keesee
Sharon Roberts
Sigrid Hall
Stewart Ellis
Mark Jensen
Embryology Committee
Molly Tuttle
Bridget Holliston
Stephanie McDowell
Extension Community Association
Gloria Smith
Katie Sutcliff
Gail Dinkins

VIII. Staff Membership

Kimberly Gressley
Title: County Extension Director and Extension Agent, 4-H Youth Development
Phone: (336) 703-2852
Email: ksgressl@ncsu.edu

Lisa Benavente
Title: Regional Nutrition Extension Associate - Urban Programming, EFNEP & SNAP-Ed
Phone: (919) 515-3888
Email: lisa_benavente@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provides programmatic supervision to the EFNEP program in Wake, Durham, and Orange Counties. Responsible for training new EFNEP educators and volunteer development.

April Bowman
Title: Extension Agent, Agriculture - Livestock, Forages and 4-H Youth Development
Phone: (336) 703-2855
Email: awbowman@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Responsible for managing the total 4-H program including 4-H Clubs, 4-H Camp, 4-H Congress, school enrichment, and presentations, as well as youth and adult livestock and forages.

Mary Jac Brennan
Title: Extension Agent, Agriculture - Horticulture
Phone: (336) 703-2850
Email: maryjac_brennan@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Small Farms, Fruit & Vegetable Production, Specialty Crops - Herbs, Mushrooms, etc., Local Foods ,Sustainable Agriculture and Urban Agriculture

Tembila Covington
Title: Program Assistant, Agriculture - Urban Agriculture
Phone: (336) 703-2859
Email: tccoving@ncsu.edu

Marti Day
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Dairy
Phone: (919) 542-8202
Email: marti_day@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Responsible for educational programs for dairy farmers, youth with an interest in dairy projects and the general public with an interest in dairy foods and the dairy industry.

Kitrinka Gordon
Title: Office Assistant III
Phone: (336) 703-2850
Email: kitrinka_gordon@ncsu.edu

Lauren Greene
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agribusiness - Poultry
Phone: (336) 651-7347
Email: lauren_greene@ncsu.edu

Megan Gregory
Title: Agriculture - Community Gardening Coordinator
Phone: (336) 703-2850
Email: gregormm@forsyth.cc
Brief Job Description: Coordinates the Forsyth Community Gardening program. Provides horticultural and community organizing assistance to garden groups; educates and supports Community Garden Mentors; teaches the 'Sustainable Growing Series' of garden-based workshops; manages seed bank, tool lending, and microgrant programs; collaborates with community organizations working in sustainable agriculture and food systems.

Tim Hambrick
Title: Area Agent, Agriculture
Phone: (336) 703-2857
Email: tim_hambrick@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Area Field Crop Agent for Forsyth, Stokes, and Surry, and Yadkin counties. Responsibilities include educational programming and research in flue cured tobacco, corn, small grain, and soybean production.

Kathy Hepler
Title: County Extension Administrative Assistant
Phone: (336) 703-2850
Email: kathy_hepler@ncsu.edu

Marissa Herchler
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Animal Food Safety (FSMA Programs)
Phone: (919) 515-5396
Email: marissa_herchler@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Marissa is an Area Specialized Agent for animal food safety, with emphasis on the new Food Safety Modernization Act rules, as they apply to feed mills in North Carolina. Please contact Marissa with any FSMA related questions, or PCQI training inquiries.

Stacey Jones
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Commercial Nursery and Greenhouse
Phone: (704) 920-3310
Email: stacey_jones@ncsu.edu

Shae King
Title: EFNEP Educator, Extension Program Assistant
Phone: (336) 703-2862
Email: shae_king@ncsu.edu

Jami Lawhon
Title: Area Agent, Family and Consumer Sciences
Phone: (336) 242-2080
Email: jami_lawhon@ncsu.edu

Bill Lord
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Water Resources
Phone: (919) 496-3344
Email: william_lord@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Water quality education and technical assistance

Craig Mauney
Title: Extension Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Commercial Vegetables & Fruits
Phone: (828) 684-3562
Email: craig_mauney@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provides educational opportunities, training and technical support to commercial fruit and vegetable growers, agents, and industry in Western NC.

Rachel McDowell
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Consumer & Retail Food Safety
Phone: (919) 515-9155
Email: romcdowe@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Support FCS Agents in delivering timely and evidence-based food safety education and information to stakeholders in NC.

Erin McSpadden
Title: Program Assistant - Volunteer Coordinator
Phone: (336) 703-2850
Email: ebmcspad@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Coordinate volunteers for 4-H and Extension Master Gardener programs, events, and activities.

Derek Morris
Title: Agricultural Technician
Phone: (336) 703-2850
Email: derek_morris@ncsu.edu

Currey Nobles
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Food Safety
Phone: (919) 515-9520
Email: canobles@ncsu.edu

Monique Pearce-Brady
Title: Extension Agent
Phone: (336) 703-2850
Email: dmpearc3@ncsu.edu

Leslie Peck
Title: Extension Agent, Agriculture - Horticulture
Phone: (336) 703-2850
Email: leslie_peck@ncsu.edu

Elena Rogers
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Food Safety - Fresh Produce Western NC
Phone: (828) 352-2519
Email: elena_rogers@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provide educational programs, training and technical support focusing on fresh produce safety to Agents and growers in Western NC.

Rocio Sedo
Title: EFNEP Educator, Extension Program Associate
Phone: (336) 703-2865
Email: rocio_sedo@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Work in EFNEP Nutrition Education Program with limited resource audience.

Phyllis Smith
Title: Extension Agent, Natural Resources
Phone: (336) 703-2858
Email: pbsmith4@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Natural Resources Conservation and Environmental Sustainability

Mitch Woodward
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Watersheds and Water Quality
Phone: (919) 250-1112
Email: mdwoodwa@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: NC Cooperative Extension's Goals include: - NC's natural resources and environmental quality will be protected, conserved and enhanced. - NC will have profitable, environmentally sustainable plant, animal and food systems. Protecting our environmental resources, particularly drinking water quality, is a top priority in NC. NC Cooperative Extension is a leader in teaching, researching, and accelerating the adoption of effective water quality protection practices.

IX. Contact Information

Forsyth County Center
1450 Fairchild Rd
Winston-Salem, NC 27105

Phone: (336) 703-2850
Fax: (336) 767-3557
URL: http://forsyth.ces.ncsu.edu