2018 Franklin County Plan of Work

Approved: January 26, 2018

I. County Background

Franklin County is one of the fastest growing counties in the Piedmont with a population of 64,705. Challenges facing the county include population expansion; balancing urban, suburban, and rural atmospheres; agricultural production and marketing; environmental protection; and the need for more commercial business, industry, and related infrastructure. The Franklin County Extension Center continues to be a gateway to NCSU and NC A&T for education, research, and extension programming. To continue to provide high impact and relevant programs, the extension staff has surveyed county government and county citizens through a variety of methods. The primary issues of concern in Franklin County include education, youth development, the environment, agriculture, nutrition and health, population growth and the economy. The local advisory leadership system and extension staff helped to narrow down the issues extension should address in its plan of work and strategies to carry out the plan. The core objectives the Franklin County staff chose to work under to address the above issues include profitable and sustainable agricultural systems, environmental sustainability, urban and consumer agriculture, local food systems, youth/adult leadership development, school to career pathways, healthy eating, physical activity and chronic disease risk reduction. These objectives will be addressed through programming efforts using county extension staff, extension specialists, advisory council and specialized committee members, volunteers, other governmental agencies, local and regional commodity groups, and the local school system. The Franklin County Center will provide the educational and technical expertise to plan, design, and implement educational programs that address the issues named above through Extension's core objectives and evaluation tools.

Franklin County has a rich agricultural heritage, and agriculture makes significant contributions to the Franklin County economy. In 2016 Franklin County was ranked number 48 amongst all NC counties with cash receipts totaling $64,586,135. There are over 128,000 forested acres with management plans in place. There are over 16,000 head of cattle in the county. The equine industry is growing tremendously in Franklin County with over 6000 horses as estimated by the May 2009 "North Carolina's Equine Industry" study. The flue-cured tobacco industry is maintaining with close to 4,100 acres in production, and organic tobacco acreage is increasing steadily each year. Other crops grown include soybeans, small grains, corn, sorghum, and barley. Sustainable farming methods and organic production are on the rise along with the support of local food production.


Our education system is strong with 16 public schools educating over 8,500 students daily. In the category of overall health Franklin County ranks #46. The top five causes of death in Franklin County are as follows; Diseases of the Heart, Cancer, Cerebrovascular diseases, Chronic lower respiratory diseases and Diabetes Mellitus. Health disparities including poor nutrition are all related to the leading causes of death.

II. Objectives to Address the Cooperative Extension Long Range Plan

North Carolina's plant production systems will become more profitable and sustainable.

North Carolina's animal production systems will become more profitable and sustainable.

Producers will increase sales of food locally to more agriculturally aware consumers through market development, producer and consumer education, and new farmer and infrastructure support.

Agricultural producers, workers, food handlers and consumers will adopt safer food and agricultural production, handling, and distribution practices that reduce workplace and home injuries/illnesses, enhance food security, and increase the quality and safety of food that North Carolinians prepare and consume.

Individuals and groups will acquire leadership and decision making capacities needed to guide and actively participate in local and state organizations.

Youth and adults will address community issues and/or challenges through volunteerism.

Futures that Work: School to Career Pathways

North Carolinians will make decisions and adopt practices that implement effective resource protection and conservation.

Consumers and communities will enhance the value of plants, animals, and landscapes while conserving valuable natural resources and protecting the environment.

Youth and adult program participants will make healthy food choices, achieve the recommended amount of physical activity and reduce risk factors for chronic diseases.

III. Relationship to County Government Objectives

The Franklin County Extension Center, of the NCCE, and the County of Franklin's vision for a better, more prosperous, and industrious Franklin County is united together in long and short range planning. Franklin County government's overall plan and goal is centered on economic development, healthier families and a skilled and educated local workforce. The environmental scans, leadership from the advisory council, and expanded partnerships in education, government, non-profits and industry, revealed and enabled the Franklin County Center to focus and implement programs in the areas of profitable and sustainable agriculture systems, local food systems, safety and security of our food and farm systems, leadership development, volunteer readiness, natural resources conservation and environmental sustainability, urban and consumer agriculture and healthy eating, physical activity and chronic disease risk reduction. The county is pointed in a positive direction of increased prosperity and ultimately sustaining our mission of "empowering people - providing solutions." The county manager and commissioners, other county departments such as Social Services, Health, Solid Waste, Economic Development, Soil and Water, our partnerships, etc., are in "one accord" with Franklin County's future.

IV. Diversity Plan

All programs are offered to individuals regardless of race, color, creed, national origin, religion, sex, age, disability, sexual orientation, and veteran status. The NCCE, Franklin County Center, has always been proactive in reaching under-served audiences. Agents will become familiar with county demographics and take this into consideration when planning programs. The staff utilizes "all reasonable efforts"in program planning. The NCCE maintains close relationships with translators and uses their expertise when needed. Both the civil rights statement and disability statement is listed on all printed materials.

V. Primary Delivery and Evaluation Methods

Delivering timely, relevant educational programs that meet critical local needs is the cornerstone of Extension’s mission. Extension's educational programs are designed to equip the citizens of Franklin County with the knowledge, skills and tools to improve their economic prosperity, environmental stewardship and quality of life. Extension's educational programs are the primary way by which research-based information is shared with targeted audiences. Extension educators in our county employ a wide variety of hands-on, experiential educational methods, such as interactive workshops and classes, demonstrations, field days and tours, that allow learners to fully engage in the learning process, test new knowledge and/or practice new skills during the educational session. Equally important, this plan will also include educational methods such as seminars, client visits, fact sheets, newsletters, and home study kits that serve to support and reinforce learning as well as provide motivation for continued learning. Armed with the most current literature on effective teaching and learning, Extension educators also skillfully select educational methods based on the learning style preferences and special needs of the targeted learners. These client-focused methods afford learners the opportunity to gain the necessary knowledge and skills to change their lives in meaningful ways. Another key feature of Extension program delivery that is evident in this plan is our commitment to being customer driven and customer focused. As such, in addition to the County Extension Center, Extension educational programs are delivered online, in community centers, on farms, and other locations in order for our programs to be available and accessible to, and fully utilized by, the citizens of Franklin County.

In Extension, success is defined as the extent to which our educational programs have made a difference in the lives of the citizens of Franklin County. Evaluation methods are the way we make those observations about first and foremost whether any changes occurred as a result of our educational programs, and subsequently the significance of those changes. As an educational organization, the changes we seek focus on key outcomes such as the knowledge and skills participants gain from our programs. More specifically, in this plan, we are using quantitative research methods such as retrospective testing, pre and post tests and/or surveys to measure change in knowledge gained, the application of that knowledge, number of new skills developed, and types of new skills developed. Extension, as a results-oriented organization, is committed to also assessing the social, economic and/or environmental impact that our programs have on the individuals who participate, their families and communities and ultimately the county as a whole (i.e. true significance of the changes stemming from our programs). We plan to measure these impacts in both the long and short-term. In this annual plan (short-term), we have outlined financial impact and cost benefit analysis as our primary evaluation methods. Another value held in Extension is actively listening to and dialoguing with targeted learners. Therefore, this plan also includes qualitative evaluation methods such as testimonials from program participants, and interviews and focus groups with participants.

VI. Membership of Advisory Leadership System

FRANKLIN COUNTY ADVISORY LEADERSHIP COUNCIL
SCOTT REECE
ELAINE WEBB
JOEY MOORE
BILLY WOOD
ENDIA HALL
QUINTON COOPER
RUSS VOLLMER
CHRISTY SOUTHALL
CHAD RAY
BRIAN CHAMPION
JAY GOOCH
HENRY SHEARIN
CEDRIC JONES
JULIE GUPTON
PAT WALKER
NATHANIEL POTTER



LIVESTOCK COMMITTEE
RANELL BRIDGES
MIKE JONES
BLAKE HALEY
EARLY JOURINGAN
MIKE MAKAR
LINDA FISHER
MARK SPEED
PATRICIA HILL
DENNIS BICKELL
AGRICULTURAL ADVISORY BOARD
WARREN HARRIS
BILLY WOOD
JOHN CONYERS
CLIFF FREEMAN
ROBERT RICHARDS
DWIGHT WILLIAMS
TRAVIS NELMS
BOB GARDNER
LINDA MAGGIO
TRAVIS NELMS
HORSE ADVISORY COMMITTEE
PAT WALKER
PAM SAULS
DONNA HESTER
JOHN DANIELS
JOAN CALDWELL
DIANE DAVIS
LISA MICHAELIS






COMMERCIAL HORTICULTURE ADVISORY COMMITTEE
BILLY WOOD
TED MULLEN
RUSS VOLLMER
TODD WARD
FORESTRY ADVISORY COMMITTEE
BRIAN CHAMPION
BILL PEARCE


FIELD CROPS ADVISORY COMMITTEE
STEVE MITCHELL
BRENT STRICKLAND
STEVE NELMS
BRANDON PERNELL
MICHAEL BELL

BEEKEEPERS ADVISORY COMMITTEE
MATT JONES
TERESA GREEN
TODD WARNER
MONICA WARNER
SANDY CARLSON


LOCAL FOODS & SUSTAINABLE AG COMMITTEE
PAT WALKER
RANELL BRIDGES
PAULA BIOVOLA
DENNIS BICKELL
NADIA SANAEI
FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCE ADVISORY COMMITTEE
JAMA STALLINGS
STUART LAMKIN
CHRISTY SOUTHALL
TRACY DUNSTON
KARI DUPREE
4-H & YOUTH DEVELOPMENT ADVISORY COMMITTEE
ELAINE WEBB
ALESIA MOORE
CORTNEY HOULSHOUSER
KARL HOULSHOUSER
JAMA STALLINGS
LAUREEN JONES
RANDY GREEN
JAMIE NEAL
SHANTA' GARNER
QUINTON COOPER
JEFFREY EDDY
KIM HOWELL
BLAKE HALEY
NATHANIEL POTTER
JAN MARIE POTTER
TAY BROWN
Small Farms/ANR Advisory Committee
PAT WALKER
LEO STALLINGS
BERNARD HALL

VII. Staff Membership

Charles Mitchell
Title: County Extension Director
Phone: (919) 496-3344
Email: charles_mitchell@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Administration, Field Crops, Pesticide Coordinator, and Horticulture.

Daniel Campeau
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Poultry
Phone: (919) 542-8202
Email: dan_campeau@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Work mainly with Commercial Poultry industry. I also work with small scale poultry production. Service area is now the North Central District from Guilford to Halifax with the southern edge being Chatham and Wake county respectively.

Brenda Collier
Title: County Extension Administrative Assistant
Phone: (919) 496-3344
Email: brenda_collier@ncsu.edu

Erin Eure
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Commercial Fruits & Vegetables
Phone: (252) 357-1400
Email: erin_eure@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provides educational opportunities and technical support to commercial fruit and vegetable growers, agents, and industry in northeastern NC.

Steve Gabel
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Aquaculture
Phone: (252) 482-6585
Email: steve_gabel@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Responsible for aquaculture educational programs for the NC NE extension district.

Colby Griffin
Title: Extension Agent, Agriculture - Horticulture
Phone: (919) 496-3344
Email: colby_griffin@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Commercial & Consumer Horticulture. Beekeeping.

Marissa Herchler
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Animal Food Safety (FSMA Programs)
Phone: (919) 515-5396
Email: marissa_herchler@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Marissa is an Area Specialized Agent for animal food safety, with emphasis on the new Food Safety Modernization Act rules, as they apply to feed mills in North Carolina. Please contact Marissa with any FSMA related questions, or PCQI training inquiries.

Lynette Johnston
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Food Safety
Phone: (919) 515-0303
Email: lynette_johnston@ncsu.edu

Jessica Kearney
Title: EFNEP Educator, Extension Program Assistant
Phone: (919) 496-3344
Email: jdkearne@ncsu.edu

William Landis
Title: Extension Agent, Agriculture - Small Farms Agent
Phone: (252) 257-3640
Email: wllandis@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Work with small and limited resource farmers to develop their enterprises making them more efficient and profitable.

Danny Lauderdale
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Nursery and Greenhouse, Eastern Region
Phone: (252) 237-0111
Email: danny_lauderdale@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provides programming to commercial ornamental nursery and greenhouse producers in eastern North Carolina.

Bill Lord
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Water Resources
Phone: (919) 496-3344
Email: william_lord@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Water quality education and technical assistance

Martha Mobley
Title: Extension Agent, Agriculture
Phone: (919) 496-3344
Email: martha_mobley@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Responsibilities include all aspects of livestock (beef, horse, goat, sheep, poultry), forage crops, Forestry, animal waste management and water quality, and CRD; LOCAL FOOD Coordinator for Franklin County; Franklin County Beekeepers Association and Franklin County Small Farmer Association; 4-H Livestock Program Coordinator for Franklin County.

Ginny Moore
Title: County Extension Secretary
Phone: (919) 496-3344
Email: ginny_moore@ncsu.edu

Chip Simmons
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Food Safety
Phone: (919) 414-5632
Email: odsimmon@ncsu.edu

Dominque Simon
Title: Area Agent, Family and Consumer Sciences - Food- Safety, Health & Nutrition
Phone: (919) 496-3344
Email: dominque_simon@ncsu.edu

Debbie Stroud
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Consumer & Retail Food Safety
Phone: (919) 515-9149
Email: dlstroud@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Area Specialized Agents in Consumer and Retail Food Safety help to ensure that Family and Consumer Sciences (FCS) Agents have access to timely, evidence-based food safety information. This is accomplished by (1) working with FCS Agents in their counties, (2) developing food safety materials and (3) planning and implementing a NC Safe Plates Food Safety Info Center.

Mitch Woodward
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Watersheds and Water Quality
Phone: (919) 250-1112
Email: mdwoodwa@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: NC Cooperative Extension's Goals include: - NC's natural resources and environmental quality will be protected, conserved and enhanced. - NC will have profitable, environmentally sustainable plant, animal and food systems. Protecting our environmental resources, particularly drinking water quality, is a top priority in NC. NC Cooperative Extension is a leader in teaching, researching, and accelerating the adoption of effective water quality protection practices.

Meg Wyatt
Title: Extension Agent, 4-H Youth Development
Phone: (919) 496-3344
Email: meg_wyatt@ncsu.edu

VIII. Contact Information

Franklin County Center
103 S Bickett Blvd
Franklin County Extension Center
Louisburg, NC 27549

Phone: (919) 496-3344
Fax: (919) 496-0222
URL: http://franklin.ces.ncsu.edu