2018 Franklin County Program Impact Report

Approved: January 25, 2019

I. Executive Summary

The Franklin County Cooperative Extension Center team had a productive programming year in 2018. Staff members used the Advisory Leadership System to help guide their program areas during 2018. Staff members also worked with neighboring counties to provide high impact programs. Extension staff focused their efforts in the following program areas: Profitable and Sustainable Agriculture Systems, Leadership Development, Natural Resources Conservation and Environmental Sustainability, School to Career, Urban and Consumer Agriculture, Local Food Systems, Volunteer Readiness, Healthy Eating and Physical Activity and Chronic Disease Risk Reduction.

In Profitable and Sustainable Agriculture Systems there were workshops, field days, and tours conducted to feature new and improved crop production practices, disease management, improved equine management, direct marketing, vegetable production, small fruit production, forestry management, and pesticide education. Impacts from these programs included 150 farmers being trained on Good Agricultural Practices (GAP) for tobacco production. The pesticide-recycling program allowed over 3,400 pesticide containers to be recycled in 2018. There were 25 hours of pesticide credit offered for 184 licensed pesticide applicators at a savings of $46,000. A fumigation respirator fit test training opportunity was provided for farmers at a total savings of $4,400. The equine industry in Franklin County continues to grow and is currently considered a $37 million-dollar industry. Therefore, the need for continuing educational opportunities such as the Equine Winter Management Series and the 23rd Annual Franklin County Area Horse Farm Tour was held in 2018. Work in local food systems has encouraged farmers to market locally and regionally through Consumer Supported Agriculture (CSA), Farmers Markets, and Internet marketing. There was a Successful Small Farms Conference held with 45 small farmers in attendance learning about small farm production opportunities. Various beekeeper educational programs were held throughout the year for the local Beekeeper Association and citizens of the county. There was a Regional Backyard Poultry Workshop held in partnership with the Tar River Poultry Initiative to teach free range poultry producers how to follow food safety laws to safely process their birds for direct marketing. With interest in other crops there was a Malting Barley Field Day held as well as a Corn Variety Field Day. A “Farm Safety: First on the Scene Program” was held so farmers could learn how to prevent farm injuries and better access farm injuries. The Women in Agriculture group continues to meet to educate themselves on issues facing farmers today as well as to network. The Visit NC Farm App was initiated in Franklin County for the Kerr-Tar Region to highlight Agritourism sites throughout the region in partnership with the NC Agritourism Network, Kerr-Tar Regional Council of Governments and Cooperative Extension. Due to the increase interest in Industrial Hemp a Regional Information Meeting was held.

In the area of Natural Resources Conservation and Environmental Sustainability the Franklin County staff has worked closely with the Franklin County Soil and Water District and the Farm Service Agency to provide information for producers on federal compliance issues and correct farming rotations. A forestry meeting and two forestry tours were held to educate forest landowners on forestry practices, forestry programs, estate planning and taxes, as well as how to explore timber sale options. A pond management field was held in order for pond owners and landowners to learn about pond design, fish species, water quality and aquatic weed management.

Urban and Commercial Horticulture programs were supported with numerous gardening articles that were written for special news releases and news segments. Local produce farmers and small fruit growers were provided with educational opportunities through workshops and field demonstrations to improve production. The Triangle Landscape School and the Eastern NC Landscape Conference and Trade Show was held to provide local Green Industry Professionals with up to date research information in the areas of turf diseases, weed management and new pesticide considerations. In the Spring and Fall home gardening classes were offered with 75% of participants stating they learned about new plants to grow and 95% showed a better understanding of proper landscape techniques. A very successful Arbor Day Tree Give Away and Strawberry Festival was held at our local Farmers’ Market with over 200 participants at each event.

Programs in the area of leadership development included working with the school system, other county departments, Chamber of Commerce, and local businesses. Cooperative Extension assisted with programs on the farm for the Chamber’s Leadership Development class. With the partnership of other 4-H and livestock extension agents, Franklin County was successful in planning and implementing a Four County 4-H Livestock Show and a Four County 4-H Poultry Show and Sale. In 2018 a Franklin County 4-H Fun Livestock Show was held to continue teaching youth about showing livestock and leadership. The 4-H Young Farmer and Rancher program was started with different career opportunities being the focus for each monthly meeting.

The School to Career impacts was shown by 4-H school enrichment activities reaching over 900 youth through programs such as embryology, soil solutions, electricity and SNAP-Ed. The 4-H Sizzling Summer Sessions reached over 354 youth through 28 different one day programs and one week including nights at the Eastern 4-H Center. Other 4-H leadership events included Teen Retreat, NC 4-H Citizenship Focus, Electric Congress, NC 4-H Congress, Northeast District 4-H Science Camp, My Preparedness Initiative and the NC County Commissioners Assoc. Conference. 4-H and the Franklin County Farm Bureau Women’s Committee partnered to offer multiple Ag in the Classroom opportunities to over 120 youth. During 2018 the 4-H youth program reached over 2800 youth.

In the area of Healthy Eating, Physical Activity, and Chronic Disease Risk Reduction Cooperative Extension received a SNAP-Ed (Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program) grant to educate 260 second and third grade students about the importance of eating healthy, making smart food choices, and having an active physical lifestyle. Surveys showed that 86% of parents observed their child eating more fruits and vegetables. The “Junior Chef” week was held to educate youth about buying local produce as well as how to cook and prepare the local food they bought. Color Me Healthy, an 8-week program developed to reach children ages four and five with fun, interactive learning opportunities on physical activity and healthy eating was taught to 87 Kindergarten students. Due to healthy food interests and interests in making and preserving foods, multiple canning classes and bread making classes were held in 2018. In efforts to lower the percentage of those diagnosed with Diabetes, decrease the obesity rate and increase physical activity among citizens a year long Diabetes education class titled “Prevent T2” was offered. Family and Consumer Sciences offered a “Cooking for Crowds” workshop at the Senior Centers to inform citizens about the importance of food safety and how to prevent food borne illnesses. The “NC Safe Plates” course was offered for food establishments Persons in Charge, and 100% of the participants passed the exam. The six week program “Med Instead of Meds’ was offered to teach citizens new and healthier ways to cook.

The Franklin County Cooperative Extension Staff worked diligently throughout 2018 to obtain over $44,250 in grants, in-kind grants, gifts, and donations. These funding sources provide a way for Cooperative Extension to improve our level of programming, and to provide additional programming to more diverse clientele. During 2018, over 275 volunteers played a significant role in planning, delivering, and evaluating Franklin County Cooperative Extension programs. These volunteers donated 1,804 hours at a value of $44,541 to Cooperative Extension and Franklin County. Franklin County is fortunate to have volunteers that participate in each of the program areas. All the staff and the citizens of Franklin County appreciate their time and dedication.

II. County Background

Franklin County is one of the fastest growing counties in the Piedmont with a population of 64,705. Challenges facing the county include population expansion; balancing urban, suburban, and rural atmospheres; agricultural production and marketing; environmental protection; and the need for more commercial business, industry, and related infrastructure. The Franklin County Extension Center continues to be a gateway to NCSU and NC A&T for education, research, and extension programming. To continue to provide high impact and relevant programs, the extension staff has surveyed county government and county citizens through a variety of methods. The primary issues of concern in Franklin County include education, youth development, the environment, agriculture, nutrition and health, population growth and the economy. The local advisory leadership system and extension staff helped to narrow down the issues extension should address in its plan of work and strategies to carry out the plan. The core objectives the Franklin County staff chose to work under to address the above issues include profitable and sustainable agricultural systems, environmental sustainability, urban and consumer agriculture, local food systems, youth/adult leadership development, school to career pathways, healthy eating, physical activity and chronic disease risk reduction. These objectives will be addressed through programming efforts using county extension staff, extension specialists, advisory council and specialized committee members, volunteers, other governmental agencies, local and regional commodity groups, and the local school system. The Franklin County Center will provide the educational and technical expertise to plan, design, and implement educational programs that address the issues named above through Extension's core objectives and evaluation tools.

Franklin County has a rich agricultural heritage, and agriculture makes significant contributions to the Franklin County economy. In 2016 Franklin County was ranked number 48 amongst all NC counties with cash receipts totaling $64,586,135. There are over 128,000 forested acres with management plans in place. There are over 16,000 head of cattle in the county. The equine industry is growing tremendously in Franklin County with over 6000 horses as estimated by the May 2009 "North Carolina's Equine Industry" study. The flue-cured tobacco industry is maintaining with close to 4,100 acres in production, and organic tobacco acreage is increasing steadily each year. Other crops grown include soybeans, small grains, corn, sorghum, and barley. Sustainable farming methods and organic production are on the rise along with the support of local food production.


Our education system is strong with 16 public schools educating over 8,500 students daily. In the category of overall health Franklin County ranks #46. The top five causes of death in Franklin County are as follows; Diseases of the Heart, Cancer, Cerebrovascular diseases, Chronic lower respiratory diseases and Diabetes Mellitus. Health disparities including poor nutrition are all related to the leading causes of death.

III. Objectives to Address the Cooperative Extension Long Range Plan

North Carolina's plant production systems will become more profitable and sustainable.

Value* Outcome Description
97Number of crop (all plant systems) producers increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, and/or skills as related to: 1. Best management production practices (cultural, nutrient, and genetics) 2. Pest/insect, disease, weed, wildlife management 3. Financial/Farm management tools and practices (business, marketing, government policy, human resources) 4. Alternative agriculture, bioenergy, and value-added enterprises
3Number of Extension initiated and controlled County demonstration test sites (new required for GLF/PSI reporting)
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
93Number of crop (all plant systems) producers adopting best management practices, including those practices related to nutrient management, conservation, production, cultivars, pest management (weeds, diseases, insects), business management, and marketing
665000Net income gains realized by the adoption of best management practices, including those practices related to nutrient management, conservation, production, cultivars, pest management (weeds, diseases, insects), business management, and marketing
65Number of producers reporting increased dollar returns per acre or reduced costs per acre
59Number of producers reporting reduction in fertilizer used per acre
9100Number of acres in conservation tillage or other Best Management Practice
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

North Carolina's animal production systems will become more profitable and sustainable.

Value* Outcome Description
1086Number of animal producers increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, and/or skills as related to: 1. Best management production practices (cultural, nutrient, and genetics) 2. Pest/insect, disease, weed, wildlife management 3. Financial/Farm management tools and practices (business, marketing, government policy, human resources) 4. Alternative agriculture, bioenergy, and value-added enterprises
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
679Number of animal producers adopting Extension-recommended best management practices, including those practices related to husbandry, improved planning, marketing, and financial practices
642175Net income gains by producers adopting Extension-recommended best management practices, including those practices related to husbandry, improved planning, marketing, and financial practices
9Number of animal producers implementing Extension-recommended best management practices for animal waste management
10Tons of livestock organic by-products utilized (nutrients from waste, compost, etc)
4000Net income gain by using livestock organic by-products instead of synthetic fertilizers
4Number of waste management certifications gained or maintained due to Extension education efforts
261Number of acres where Extension-recommended waste analysis was used for proper land application
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Producers will increase sales of food locally to more agriculturally aware consumers through market development, producer and consumer education, and new farmer and infrastructure support.

Value* Outcome Description
238Number of producers who gain skills or knowledge to increase production for local markets.
369Number of adults (including producers, food business owners, etc.) who improved knowledge of local food and agricultural systems.
131Number of children/youth who improved knowledge of local food and agricultural systems.
143Number of individuals who gain knowledge or acquire skills related to vegetable/fruit gardening, and if also reporting under Urban and Consumer Agriculture Objective, divide up the reported number appropriately between the two objectives to avoid duplication.
169Number of producers who improve local food marketing skills or knowledge.
67Number of individuals who learn how to prepare local foods, including through use of home food preservation techniques.
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
6Number of new and existing access points for consumers that expand or improve their offering of local fruits and vegetables. Access points include farmers markets, retail stores, school food programs, community gardens, institutions other than schools (e.g. hospitals, universities, etc.), and other systems/access points not noted (e.g. restaurants, etc.).
63Number of producers selling their agricultural products to local markets (direct, intermediated/food service, institutional) for consumption in NC.
71Number of producers who diversified their marketing strategies into local markets (direct, intermediated/food service, institutional).
375000Gross sales of local foods by producers. (Increase in gross sales to be calculated at the state level.)
7Number of producers (and other members of the local food supply chain) who have increased revenue.
22Number of new farms (beginning farmers) selling into local markets for local consumption (in this reporting period).
2Number of new local food value chain businesses, other than farms (in this reporting period).
1Number of individuals who grow food in community gardens.
30550Number of pounds of local foods donated for consumption by vulnerable populations.
1Number of youth who grow food in school gardens.
1Number of individuals who begin home food production by starting a vegetable and/or fruit garden, and if also reporting under Urban and Consumer Horticulture Objective, divide up the reported number appropriately between the two objectives to avoid duplication.
108Number of individuals who begin home food production by starting to raise backyard livestock.
21000Number of pounds of fresh produce donated for consumption by vulnerable populations.
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Agricultural producers, workers, food handlers and consumers will adopt safer food and agricultural production, handling, and distribution practices that reduce workplace and home injuries/illnesses, enhance food security, and increase the quality and safety of food that North Carolinians prepare and consume.

Value* Outcome Description
7Number of food service employees receiving ServSafe certification
49Number of participants trained in safe home food handling, preservation, or preparation practices
42TOTAL number of food handlers receiving food safety training and education in safe food handling practices (new required data for federal reporting)
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
7Number of participants implementing ServSafe
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Individuals and groups will acquire leadership and decision making capacities needed to guide and actively participate in local and state organizations.

Value* Outcome Description
166Number of adults increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
11Number of adults assuming new/expanded leadership roles in the community
1190Number of youth increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
22Number of youth assuming new/expanded leadership roles in the community
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
43Number of adults increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
19Number of adults assuming new/expanded leadership roles in the community
1190Number of youth increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
22Number of youth assuming new/expanded leadership roles in the community
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Youth and adults will address community issues and/or challenges through volunteerism.

Value* Outcome Description
57Number of adult participants acquiring the skills needed to serve as a volunteer
11Number of youth participants reporting aspirations to serve in new or expanded volunteer roles in community
25Number of adult participants reporting aspirations to serve in new or expanded volunteer roles in community
66Number of hours adult volunteer training conducted
56Number of hours youth volunteer training conducted
10Number new volunteers recruited
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
56Increased number of hours contributed by trained youth volunteers
440Increased number of hours contributed by trained adult volunteers
6Number of youth volunteers serving in new or expanded roles within Extension
3Number of adult volunteers serving in new or expanded roles within Extension
2Number of youth volunteers serving in new or expanded roles beyond Extension, including community boards and task forces
2Number of adult volunteers serving in new or expanded roles beyond Extension, including community boards and task forces
5Number of youth volunteers recruiting and/or training new volunteers
4Number of adult volunteers recruiting and/or training new volunteers
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Futures that Work: School to Career Pathways

Value* Outcome Description
19Number of teachers trained in 4-H STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) curriculum
1743Number of youth (students) increasing knowledge in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math)
860Total number of female participants in STEM program
66Number of high school age youth (students) participating as members of 4-H clubs
25Number of youth (students) increasing knowledge of career/employability skills
75Number of adults increasing knowledge of career/employability skills
102Number of youth (students) increasing knowledge of entrepreneurship
5Number of adults increasing knowledge of entrepreneurship
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
25Number of teachers using 4-H STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) curriculum in their classrooms
1743Number of youth (students) gaining knowledge in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math)
102Number of youth (students) gaining career / employability skills
5Number of adults gaining career / employability skills
75Number of youth (students) gaining entrepreneurship skills
5Number of adults gaining entrepreneurship skills
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

North Carolinians will make decisions and adopt practices that implement effective resource protection and conservation.

Value* Outcome Description
98Number of participants increasing their knowledge about best management practices
12Number of participants certified to implement and maintain BMPs
12Number of child and youth educators aspiring to implement quality outdoor learning environments for children
153Number of youth and adults demonstrating increased knowledge of natural resources and environmental issues
6Number of youth willing to participate in conservation actions
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
51Number of participants that adopted recommended climate adaption strategies for production agriculture or natural resource management, including for invasive species, pest management, pollutant loads, and wetlands.
20100Number of acres under recommended climate adaption strategies for production agriculture or natural resource management, including for invasive species, pest management, pollutant loads, and wetlands.
64Number of participants that adopted recommended climate mitigation practices such as water-use efficiency, livestock production feeding practices, carbon sequestration, reducing carbon or energy footprint.
2001Number of acres under recommended climate mitigation practices such as water-use efficiency, livestock production feeding practices, carbon sequestration, reducing carbon or energy footprint.
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Consumers and communities will enhance the value of plants, animals, and landscapes while conserving valuable natural resources and protecting the environment.

Value* Outcome Description
515Number of participants improving knowledge, attitude, skills and aspirations regarding gardening and landscape practices including plant selection and placement, turfgrass management, soil management, growing food, water conservation and water quality preservation, storm water and erosion management, green waste management, pest and wildlife management
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
550Number of participants who use extension-recommended best management practices in landscapes, turf, and gardens, including pest (insect, weed, disease) management, fertility management, water conservation, water quality preservation and pruning techniques
520700Total cost savings from the use of extension-recommended best management practices in landscapes, turf, and gardens, including pest (insect, weed, disease) management, fertility management, water conservation, water quality preservation and pruning techniques
178Number of participants who use extension-recommended pest management practices in homes, public facilities, businesses or in community pest management programs
16000Cost savings from using extension-recommended pest management practices in homes, public facilities, businesses or in community pest management programs
1111Number of participants selecting appropriate landscape plants (adapted, drought tolerant, appropriate size, etc.)
237740Cost savings from the appropriate selection of landscape plants
145Number of participants growing food for home consumption
37750Value of produce grown for home consumption
12Number of participants adopting composting
65Number of participants implementing extension-recommended practices to conserve water use and protect water qualtiy
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Youth and adult program participants will make healthy food choices, achieve the recommended amount of physical activity and reduce risk factors for chronic diseases.

Value* Impact Description
73Number of adults increasing their fruit and vegetables consumption
110Number of youth increasing their fruit and vegetable consumption
193Number of participants increasing their physical activity
26Number of participants reducing their BMI
37Number of adults who improve their blood glucose (A1c.)level
15Number of participants who consume less sodium in their diet
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

IV. Number of Contacts Made by Extension

Type of ContactNumber
Face-to-face* 25,784
Non face-to-face** 19,154
Total by Extension staff in 2018 44,938
* Face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make directly with individuals through one-on-one visits, meetings, and other activities where staff members work directly with individuals.
** Non face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make indirectly with individuals by telephone, email, newsletters, news articles, radio, television, and other means.

V. Designated Grants Received by Extension

Type of GrantAmount
Contracts/Grants $15,326.00
Gifts/Donations $28,210.00
In-Kind Grants/Donations $715.00
United Way/Foundations $0.00
User Fees $0.00
Total $44,251.00

VI. Volunteer Involvement in Extension Programs

Number of Volunteers* Number of Volunteer Hours Known client contacts by volunteers Dollar Value at 24.69
4-H: 352 917 1,308 $ 22,641.00
Advisory Leadership System: 50 151 90 $ 3,728.00
Extension Community Association: 0 0 0 $ 0.00
Extension Master Gardener: 0 0 0 $ 0.00
Other: 147 736 1,202 $ 18,172.00
Total: 549 1804 2600 $ 44,541.00
* The number of volunteers reflects the overall number of volunteers for multiple events.

VII. Membership of Advisory Leadership System

FRANKLIN COUNTY ADVISORY LEADERSHIP COUNCIL
SCOTT REECE
ELAINE WEBB
JOEY MOORE
BILLY WOOD
ENDIA HALL
QUINTON COOPER
RUSS VOLLMER
CHRISTY SOUTHALL
CHAD RAY
BRIAN CHAMPION
JAY GOOCH
HENRY SHEARIN
CEDRIC JONES
JULIE GUPTON
PAT WALKER
NATHANIEL POTTER



LIVESTOCK COMMITTEE
RANELL BRIDGES
MIKE JONES
BLAKE HALEY
EARLY JOURINGAN
MIKE MAKAR
LINDA FISHER
MARK SPEED
PATRICIA HILL
DENNIS BICKELL
AGRICULTURAL ADVISORY BOARD
WARREN HARRIS
BILLY WOOD
JOHN CONYERS
CLIFF FREEMAN
ROBERT RICHARDS
DWIGHT WILLIAMS
TRAVIS NELMS
BOB GARDNER
LINDA MAGGIO
TRAVIS NELMS
HORSE ADVISORY COMMITTEE
PAT WALKER
PAM SAULS
DONNA HESTER
JOHN DANIELS
JOAN CALDWELL
DIANE DAVIS
LISA MICHAELIS






COMMERCIAL HORTICULTURE ADVISORY COMMITTEE
BILLY WOOD
TED MULLEN
RUSS VOLLMER
TODD WARD
FORESTRY ADVISORY COMMITTEE
BRIAN CHAMPION
BILL PEARCE


FIELD CROPS ADVISORY COMMITTEE
STEVE MITCHELL
BRENT STRICKLAND
STEVE NELMS
BRANDON PERNELL
MICHAEL BELL

BEEKEEPERS ADVISORY COMMITTEE
MATT JONES
TERESA GREEN
TODD WARNER
MONICA WARNER
SANDY CARLSON


LOCAL FOODS & SUSTAINABLE AG COMMITTEE
PAT WALKER
RANELL BRIDGES
PAULA BIOVOLA
DENNIS BICKELL
NADIA SANAEI
FAMILY AND CONSUMER SCIENCE ADVISORY COMMITTEE
JAMA STALLINGS
STUART LAMKIN
CHRISTY SOUTHALL
TRACY DUNSTON
KARI DUPREE
4-H & YOUTH DEVELOPMENT ADVISORY COMMITTEE
ELAINE WEBB
ALESIA MOORE
CORTNEY HOULSHOUSER
KARL HOULSHOUSER
JAMA STALLINGS
LAUREEN JONES
RANDY GREEN
JAMIE NEAL
SHANTA' GARNER
QUINTON COOPER
JEFFREY EDDY
KIM HOWELL
BLAKE HALEY
NATHANIEL POTTER
JAN MARIE POTTER
TAY BROWN
Small Farms/ANR Advisory Committee
PAT WALKER
LEO STALLINGS
BERNARD HALL

VIII. Staff Membership

Charles Mitchell
Title: County Extension Director
Phone: (919) 496-3344
Email: charles_mitchell@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Administration, Field Crops, Pesticide Coordinator, and Horticulture.

Daniel Campeau
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Poultry
Phone: (919) 542-8202
Email: dan_campeau@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Work mainly with Commercial Poultry industry. I also work with small scale poultry production. Service area is now the North Central District from Guilford to Halifax with the southern edge being Chatham and Wake county respectively.

Brenda Collier
Title: County Extension Administrative Assistant
Phone: (919) 496-3344
Email: brenda_collier@ncsu.edu

Erin Eure
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Commercial Fruits and Vegetables
Phone: (252) 357-1400
Email: erin_eure@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provides educational opportunities and technical support to commercial fruit and vegetable growers, agents, and industry in northeastern NC.

Steve Gabel
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Aquaculture
Phone: (252) 482-6585
Email: steve_gabel@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Responsible for aquaculture educational programs for the NC NE extension district.

Colby Griffin
Title: Extension Agent, Agriculture - Commercial and Consumer Horticulture
Phone: (919) 496-3344
Email: colby_griffin@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Commercial & Consumer Horticulture Extension Agent.

Marissa Herchler
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Animal Food Safety (FSMA Programs)
Phone: (919) 515-5396
Email: marissa_herchler@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Marissa is an Area Specialized Agent for animal food safety, with emphasis on the new Food Safety Modernization Act rules, as they apply to feed mills in North Carolina. Please contact Marissa with any FSMA related questions, or PCQI training inquiries.

Lynette Johnston
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Food Safety
Phone: (919) 515-0303
Email: lynette_johnston@ncsu.edu

Jessica Kearney
Title: EFNEP Educator, Extension Program Assistant
Phone: (919) 496-3344
Email: jdkearne@ncsu.edu

William Landis
Title: Extension Agent, Agriculture - Small Farms
Phone: (252) 257-3640
Email: wllandis@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Work with small and limited resource farmers to develop their enterprises making them more efficient and profitable.

Danny Lauderdale
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Nursery and Greenhouse, Eastern Region
Phone: (252) 237-0111
Email: danny_lauderdale@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provides programming to commercial ornamental nursery and greenhouse producers in eastern North Carolina.

Bill Lord
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Water Resources
Phone: (919) 496-3344
Email: william_lord@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Water quality education and technical assistance

Martha Mobley
Title: Extension Agent, Agriculture
Phone: (919) 496-3344
Email: martha_mobley@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Responsibilities include all aspects of livestock (beef, horse, goat, sheep, poultry), forage crops, Forestry, animal waste management and water quality, and CRD; LOCAL FOOD Coordinator for Franklin County; Franklin County Beekeepers Association and Franklin County Small Farmer Association; 4-H Livestock Program Coordinator for Franklin County.

Ginny Moore
Title: County Extension Secretary
Phone: (919) 496-3344
Email: ginny_moore@ncsu.edu

Chip Simmons
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Food Safety
Phone: (919) 414-5632
Email: odsimmon@ncsu.edu

Dominque Simon
Title: Area Agent, Family and Consumer Sciences - Food- Safety, Health and Nutrition
Phone: (919) 496-3344
Email: dominque_simon@ncsu.edu

Debbie Stroud
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Consumer and Retail Food Safety
Phone: (919) 515-9149
Email: dlstroud@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Area Specialized Agents in Consumer and Retail Food Safety help to ensure that Family and Consumer Sciences (FCS) Agents have access to timely, evidence-based food safety information. This is accomplished by (1) working with FCS Agents in their counties, (2) developing food safety materials and (3) planning and implementing a NC Safe Plates Food Safety Info Center.

Mitch Woodward
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Watersheds and Water Quality
Phone: (919) 250-1112
Email: mdwoodwa@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: NC Cooperative Extension's Goals include: - NC's natural resources and environmental quality will be protected, conserved and enhanced. - NC will have profitable, environmentally sustainable plant, animal and food systems. Protecting our environmental resources, particularly drinking water quality, is a top priority in NC. NC Cooperative Extension is a leader in teaching, researching, and accelerating the adoption of effective water quality protection practices.

Meg Wyatt
Title: Extension Agent, 4-H Youth Development
Phone: (919) 496-3344
Email: meg_wyatt@ncsu.edu

IX. Contact Information

Franklin County Center
103 S Bickett Blvd
Franklin County Extension Center
Louisburg, NC 27549

Phone: (919) 496-3344
Fax: (919) 496-0222
URL: http://franklin.ces.ncsu.edu