2019 Granville County Program Impact Report

Approved: January 13, 2020

I. Executive Summary

The Granville County NC Cooperative Extension Team gathered input from constituents, the volunteer advisory committees, and County Government. Based on that input, the Team developed programs to address the identified needs and provided programs in these program areas: Plant Production Systems, Animal Production Systems, 4-H Youth Development, Natural Resources and Environmental Programs, Consumer Horticulture, and Food Safety and Nutrition.

In Plant Production Systems, demonstration plots were established and evaluated in corn, small grains, and soybeans to assist growers in identifying varieties best suited to this area, and demonstrate IPM practices and other treatments that would work best on their farms. A popcorn trial introduced a potential alternative crop for the area. Insect monitoring helped growers to make management decisions. Commodity crop grower meetings were held, a respirator Fit Test was conducted, and Good Agricultural Practices training impacted each tobacco grower in the county. Farmers received assistance with greenhouse problems and with disease and insect issues during the growing season. Grower meetings and field tours were held for Industrial Hemp growers, who also received assistance and field visits from the Extension Agents.

Programs conducted in Animal Production Systems included programs on intensive grazing management, which helped livestock producers reduce fertilizer costs and improve animal nutrition. Coggin’s Clinics were held to test horses for Equine Infectious Anemia. A Breeding Soundness Clinic was held to assist beef producers in making sure their bulls were sound. Growers also participated in regional tours and field days.

4-H Youth Development programs focused on managing 4-H community clubs, summer 4-H programming, and conducting in-school enrichment programs such as 4-H Embryology. Members participated in District Activity Day, 4-H Congress, the NC State Fair, and other local, district, and state events. Members submitted project records at the county and district level. Members participated in the 4-County Poultry Show and Sale and in Electric Congress.

In Natural Resource and Environmental Programs, producers implemented Best Management Practices (BMP) on their farms to reduce nutrient runoff into surface waters. Manure irrigation units were calibrated to reduce nutrient runoff and prevent nutrient buildup in the soil. A lagoon was surveyed to ensure that it was operating within design specifications for manure storage. Farm visits were made to provide recommendations to landowners and farmers on controlling aquatic weeds. A Forest Workshop series provided information forest landowners can use in managing their woodlands.

The NC Cooperative Extension Horticulture Agent continued working with the Federal Bureau of Prisons to provide horticulture training to qualifying inmates. Master Gardeners received training and conducted volunteer work. A landscape professionals workshop featured pruning techniques, weed control in lawns, information on protecting pollinators, and turf disease control. Field visits were made to assist growers with commercial horticulture operations, including strawberries. A blueberry pruning demonstration was conducted, along with programs on vegetable production in conjunction with the county libraries.

Food Safety and Nutrition programming included collaborating with the Granville County Health Department to conduct “Living Healthy with Diabetes”, where participants learned how to better manage diabetes through nutrition. Other nutrition programming included the “Med Instead of Meds” program, canning vegetables, how to read nutrition labels, and grocery store tours. The Extension Volunteer Association conducted the “Backpack Buddies” program to provide food to children of limited resource families.

Additional resources supporting NC Cooperative Extension, Granville County, included $93,610 in grant funding, user fees, and donations. Volunteers contributed 5,933 hours of service to Extension programs, valued at $150, 876. Volunteers are critical to the success of Extension programs.

II. County Background

Granville County is located in the North Central Piedmont region of North Carolina, bordering Virginia to the north, Wake and Durham Counties to the south, Person County to the West, and Vance and Franklin Counties to the East. Interstate 85 runs through the county providing easy access to Interstates 40 and 95. Granville County has a diversified industrial and agricultural base, and is experiencing residential growth due to the proximity to Raleigh and Durham. The county has five incorporated towns, including Butner, Creedmoor, Stem, Stovall, and Oxford, the county seat.  

Granville County is located in the North Central Piedmont region of North Carolina, bordering Virginia to the north, Wake and Durham Counties to the south, Person County to the West, and Vance and Franklin Counties to the East. Interstate 85 runs through the county providing easy access to Interstates 40 and 95. Granville County has a diversified industrial and agricultural base, and is experiencing residential growth in the southern part of the county due to the proximity to Raleigh and Durham. The county has five incorporated towns, including Butner, Creedmoor, Stem, Stovall, and Oxford, the county seat.

The 2010 US Census shows the population to be 59,916. There has been an increase in population of 23.5% since April of 2000. The population is made up of 60 % white, 33% black and 7% Hispanic or Latino.

Granville County has a rich agricultural heritage, with agriculture and forestry contributing over $35 million cash receipts to the county economy. Tobacco continues to be the number one cash crop, with approximately 3,100 acres of tobacco harvested in 2017, valued at over $13 million. Other crops grown include corn, soybeans, and small grains. Horticultural crops continue to expand across the county, with growers diversifying into other crops such as strawberries, peppers, and sweet potatoes. Livestock production is an important part of the overall farm economy, with over 7,000 cattle estimated on farms in 2017. The number of horses in the county continues to increase, with 3,500 estimated on farms. The value-added economic impact of Agriculture and Forestry was calculated to be over $493 million, thanks to processing facilities for tobacco and hot peppers. Agriculture and Agri-business employs 9.6% of the Granville County workforce.

Granville County has over 226,700 acres of forestland, representing 65% of all land in Granville County. Delivered value of harvested timber to primary mills in 2016 totaled over $13 million dollars.

The Granville County Cooperative Extension Service seeks input from stakeholders to identify current and future issues in the areas of Agriculture and Horticulture, 4-H Youth Development, Family and Consumer Sciences, Community Development, and Forestry. Specialized committees for Livestock, Horticulture, Field Crops, Family and Consumer Sciences and 4-H, agency representatives, local government, and citizens all helped determine local priorities. The priorities that were identified include Agricultural Profitability, Youth Participation and Career Preparation, Forest Management and Profitability, and Economic Development. These priorities are consistent with Granville County’s mission of providing a safe, secure place to live by improving Public Safety, and improving Human and Social Services, Enhanced Environmental Management, Improving Education, Enhancing Recreational and Cultural Opportunities, and Economic Development.

Extension will use research-based information to address these issues. County staff will work with specialists and faculty at NC State University and NC A&T State University to bring this research-based information to Granville County citizens. We will partner with individuals, county government, other state and county agencies to bring educational programs that focus on these issues to Granville County citizens.

III. Objectives to Address the Cooperative Extension Long Range Plan

Our plant production programs improve production, profitability, and sustainability of the agriculture sector.

Value* Outcome Description
500Number of producers who gain skills or knowledge to increase production for local markets.
561Number of pesticide applicators receiving continuing education credits
1866Number of pesticide credit hours provided
570Number of crop (all plant systems) producers increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, and/or skills as related to: 1. Best management production practices (cultural, nutrient, and genetics) 2. Pest/insect, disease, weed, wildlife management 3. Financial/Farm management tools and practices (business, marketing, government policy, human resources) 4. Alternative agriculture, bioenergy, and value-added enterprises
20Number of Extension initiated and controlled county demonstration test sites
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
100Number of producers who diversified their marketing strategies into local markets (direct, intermediated/food service, institutional).
10Number of new farms (beginning farmers) selling into local markets for local consumption (in this reporting period)
100Number of producers reporting reduction in fertilizer used per acre
2000Number of acres in conservation tillage or other Best Management Practice
500Number of crop (all plant systems) producers adopting best management practices, including those practices related to nutrient management, conservation, production, cultivars, pest management (weeds, diseases, insects), business management, and marketing
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Our animal production programs improve production, profitability, and sustainability of the agriculture sector.

Value* Outcome Description
16Number of animal producers who increased knowledge of farm business management, business planning, financial management, marketing, or estate planning.
35Number of animal producers who learned how to develop a management plan (i.e. grazing plan, feeding plan, drought plan, business plan, disaster plan, etc.)
240Number of producers who increased knowledge of pasture/forage management practices (field improvement, herbicide management, grazing season extension, weed control, forage quality, haylage production, nitrate testing, etc.)
150Number of producers who increased knowledge of nutrition, ration balancing, mineral supplements, breeding, and reproduction
28Number of producers who increased knowledge of the strategies to promote animal health and welfare and reduce the potential for infectious diseases through proper use of vaccines, biosecurity, detection and identification of common diseases, appropriate use of animal medications, and mitigation of antimicrobial resistance transmission
3Number of producers who increased knowledge of animal waste management practices
18Number of animal waste management credits earned through Extension programs
2Number of Extension conducted on-site sludge surveys or equipment calibrations
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
5Number of new farms (beginning farmers) selling into local markets for local consumption (in this reporting period)
16Number of producers (and other members of the local food supply chain) who have increased revenue
52Number of participants that have adopted farm safety practices
16Number of producers adopting extension-recommended practices related to planning, marketing, and financial management
3Number of producers implementing Extension-recommended best management practices for animal waste management
5400Number of acres where Extension-recommended nutrient applications were used
25Number of producers who adopted Extension-recommended best management practices and production changes related to quality assurance (vaccinations, castration, culling techniques, etc.)
10Number of producers who adopted Extension-recommended best management practices and production changes related to genetic improvement (AI, heifer/bull selection)
35Number of producers who adopted Extension-recommended best management practices and production changes related to nutrition (mineral, feed rations)
8Number of producers who adopted Extension-recommended best management practices and production changes related to internal parasite management (fecals, deworming)
230Number of producers who adopted Extension-recommended best management practices related to pasture management
240Number of producers who adopted Extension-recommended best management practices and production changes related to nutrition, ration balancing, mineral supplement, breeding, and reproduction
1Number of waste utilization/waste management plans developed or updated
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Our 4-H youth development programs grow the skills young people need to succeed in life and career.

Our natural resource and environmental programs conserve our precious natural resources and maintain a clean and healthy environment.

Value* Outcome Description
128Number of participants increasing their knowledge about best management practices (including storm water systems, septic system maintenance, erosion control, rain gardens, forestry, etc.)
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Our consumer horticulture programs teach families and communities about environmentally friendly methods for gardening and controlling pests.

Value* Outcome Description
12Number of individuals who gain knowledge or acquire skills related to vegetable/fruit gardening
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
3Number of individuals who begin home food production by starting a vegetable and/or fruit garden
93Number of participants who use extension-recommended best management practices in landscapes, turf, and gardens, including pest (insect, weed, disease, wildlife) and soil management
8Number of participants selecting appropriate landscape plants (adapted, drought tolerant, appropriate size, etc.)
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Our food safety and nutrition programs create a safer and more sustainable food supply and improve the health and nutrition of individuals, families, and our communities.

Value* Outcome Description
35Number of participants who increase their knowledge of safe home food handling, preservation, or preparation practices
10Number of food handlers who increase their knowledge and skills in safe food handling practices
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
3Number of new and existing access points for consumers that expand or improve their offering of local fruits and vegetables. Access points include farmers markets, retail stores, school food programs, community gardens, institutions other than schools (e.g. hospitals, universities, etc.), and other systems/access points not noted (e.g. restaurants, etc.).
10Number of participants developing food safety plans
80Number of adults increasing their fruit and vegetables consumption
95Number of participants increasing their physical activity
50Number of pounds of local food donated for consumption by vulnerable populations
75Number of participants who consume less sodium in their diet
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

IV. Number of Contacts Made by Extension

Type of ContactNumber
Face-to-face* 10,881
Non face-to-face** 574,494
Total by Extension staff in 2019 585,375
* Face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make directly with individuals through one-on-one visits, meetings, and other activities where staff members work directly with individuals.
** Non face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make indirectly with individuals by telephone, email, newsletters, news articles, radio, television, and other means.

V. Designated Grants Received by Extension

Type of GrantAmount
Contracts/Grants $70,700.00
Gifts/Donations $5,250.00
In-Kind Grants/Donations $0.00
United Way/Foundations $16,205.00
User Fees $1,455.00
Total $93,610.00

VI. Volunteer Involvement in Extension Programs

Number of Volunteers* Number of Volunteer Hours Known client contacts by volunteers Dollar Value at 25.43
4-H 22 8 51 $ 203.00
Advisory Leadership System 30 8 50 $ 203.00
Extension Community Association 20 5850 8210 $ 148,766.00
Extension Master Gardener 6 54 0 $ 1,373.00
Other: Agriculture 22 13 122 $ 331.00
Total: 100 5933 8433 $ 150,876.00
* The number of volunteers reflects the overall number of volunteers for multiple events.

VII. Membership of Advisory Leadership System

Granville County Extension Advisory Leadership Council
Marty Smith
Laura Gabel
Xavier Wortham
Timothy Karan
Annie Nesbitt
Ginnie Currin
Brindell Wilkins
Vicki Salisbury
Jason Brand
Harry Mills
Field Crops Specialized Committee
H. R. Carver
Brad Coley
Charles Currin
Earl Brooks
Sam Brake
Albert Howard
Forestry Specialized Committee
Andy Melton
Rob Montague
Diana Lewis
Tim Harris
Randy Guthrie
Livestock Specialized Committee
Steve Walker
Haywood Faucette
Willie Richards
Sandy Gabel
Steve Hicks
Kay Stark
Horticulture Specialized Committee
Randy Bailey
Michael Boyd
Michael Brinkley
Deborah Brogden
Gary Byrd
Jason Dickerson
Frank Broekman
Carrie Harvey
Family and Consumer Sciences Specialized Committee
Carrier, Cheryl
Currin, Ginnie
Gabel, Laura
Haddix, Jamie
Hinman, Sue
May, Kathy
Moseley, Betty
Nesbitt, Annie
Sergent, Jackie
Smith, Marty
Wortham, Xavier
4-H Specialized Committee
Kim Holmes
Jerry Holmes
Charissa Puryear
Kelly Fetterhoff
Laniya Rogers
Ella Holsomback
Jayden Grant

VIII. Staff Membership

Paul Westfall
Title: County Extension Director
Phone: (919) 603-1350
Email: paul_westfall@ncsu.edu

Jonas Asbill
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Livestock - Poultry
Phone: (336) 318-6000
Email: jonas_asbill@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Serving the poultry industry across 20 counties in the North Central and Northeast districts

Jennifer Brown
Title: Area Agent, Family and Consumer Sciences
Phone: (336) 599-1195
Email: jennifer.brown@ncsu.edu

Johnny Coley
Title: Agriculture Agent - Consumer and Commercial Horticulture
Phone: (919) 603-1350
Email: johnny_coley@ncsu.edu

Gary Cross
Title: Area Agent, Agriculture - Field Crops
Phone: (919) 603-1350
Email: gary_cross@ncsu.edu

Catherine Crowder
Title: 4-H Program Assistant
Phone: (919) 603-1350
Email: cedemmin@ncsu.edu

Erin Eure
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Commercial Fruits and Vegetables
Phone: (252) 357-1400
Email: erin_eure@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provides educational opportunities and technical support to commercial fruit and vegetable growers, agents, and industry in northeastern NC.

Marissa Herchler
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Animal Food Safety (FSMA Programs)
Phone: (919) 515-5396
Email: marissa_herchler@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Marissa is an Area Specialized Agent for animal food safety, with emphasis on the new Food Safety Modernization Act rules, as they apply to feed mills in North Carolina. Please contact Marissa with any FSMA related questions, or PCQI training inquiries.

Lina Howe
Title: Extension Agent, 4-H Youth Development
Phone: (919) 603-1350
Email: lelue@ncsu.edu

Lynette Johnston
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Food Safety
Phone: (919) 515-0303
Email: lynette_johnston@ncsu.edu

Peggie Lewis Joyce
Title: Area 4-H Agent - Central Region
Phone: (336) 242-2080
Email: peggie_lewis@ncsu.edu

Danny Lauderdale
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Ornamental Nursery and Greenhouse, Eastern Region
Phone: (252) 237-0111
Email: danny_lauderdale@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provides programming to commercial ornamental nursery and greenhouse producers in eastern North Carolina.

Latonia Oakley
Title: Program Assistant, UnRappin' the Gift/He Matters
Phone: (919) 603-1350
Email: lhoakley@ncsu.edu

Charissa Puryear
Title: 4-H Youth Programs Coordinator
Phone: (919) 603-1350
Email: charissa_puryear@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Program Coordinator for Juvenile Community Service and Restitution and Granville County Teen Court

Gwen Rubio
Title: County Extension Administrative Assistant
Phone: (919) 603-1350
Email: gkhernan@ncsu.edu

Chip Simmons
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Food Safety
Phone: (919) 414-5632
Email: odsimmon@ncsu.edu

Debbie Stroud
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Consumer and Retail Food Safety
Phone: (919) 515-9149
Email: dlstroud@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Area Specialized Agents in Consumer and Retail Food Safety help to ensure that Family and Consumer Sciences (FCS) Agents have access to timely, evidence-based food safety information. This is accomplished by (1) working with FCS Agents in their counties, (2) developing food safety materials and (3) planning and implementing a NC Safe Plates Food Safety Info Center.

Kim Woods
Title: Area Agent, Agriculture - Animal Science
Phone: (336) 599-1195
Email: kim_woods@ncsu.edu

Mitch Woodward
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Watersheds and Water Quality
Phone: (919) 414-3873
Email: mdwoodwa@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: NC Cooperative Extension's Goals include: - NC's natural resources and environmental quality will be protected, conserved and enhanced. - NC will have profitable, environmentally sustainable plant, animal and food systems. Protecting our environmental resources, particularly drinking water quality, is a top priority in NC. NC Cooperative Extension is a leader in teaching, researching, and accelerating the adoption of effective water quality protection practices.

IX. Contact Information

Granville County Center
125 Oxford Outer Loop
Oxford, NC 27565

Phone: (919) 603-1350
Fax: (919) 603-0268
URL: http://granville.ces.ncsu.edu