2017 Anson County Program Impact Report

Approved: February 16, 2018

I. Executive Summary

The 8-member staff of the Anson County Cooperative Extension Center includes three full-time agents, one area agent, one director with program responsibilities, one administrative assistant, and two grant-funded after-school staff members. Last year, the Anson County team worked to address needs identified by advisory and program committees that included: increasing agriculture profitability through marketing, diagnostic support and best management practices; supporting production efforts through research trials, certification opportunities and subject matter training; management and conservation of natural resources, including pollinators; opportunities for youth and families in personal development, health and wellness, and technology integration; and finally, investing in the county’s future through capital projects. In 2017, Anson County Extension staff developed and implemented programs that involved 8,921 citizens in direct services, events, and activities. Another 21,653 were indirectly contacted through a combination of telephone calls, email list-serves, newsletters, fact sheets and direct mailings. Following is a brief narrative of Anson Extension program areas' work towards addressing community needs and issues.

Extension educational efforts for 2017 in the area of agricultural production focused on improving producer knowledge/skills and applying that knowledge for increased efficiencies, production and profits. Six hundred seventy-eight area animal producers gained insights into animal production/marketing, reproductive management, forage management, waste management, best management of pests and value-added products. Twenty-seven producers adopted new practices such as participation in a new marketing event which resulted in over $35,000 of additional income over previous best marketing practices. For 330 corn, soybean, cotton and small grain area producers, educational meetings, field days, on-farm demonstrations and visits provided opportunities to improve their knowledge and skill sets. In fact, on-farm demonstration tests were conducted at 13 sites in 2017. For 159 of those producers, the knowledge and skills gained resulted in 101 of them reporting increased returns or decreased production costs per acre. Thirty-five of them actually decreased fertilizer use per acre. As a result, overall net income for that group increased by $1,568,600 in 2017.

Urban and consumer horticulture programs served 4,322 clients. Topics included pruning field days, beekeeper classes, daycare programs, summer camps, and many gardening classes conducted for groups around the county. Anson Extension assisted landowners with five forest management plans covering 318 acres. Landowner benefits from technical assistance and property tax savings totaled $5,055. In addition, 365 youth and adults participated in natural resource activities through summer camp, school enrichment, and private forest landowner workshops. Throughout the year nearly 5,000 producers and homeowners called upon Anson Cooperative Extension for education, technical assistance, or individual site visits, incorporating recommended practices that resulted in $28,700 in cost savings.

Anson County 4-H continues to strive to shape the character and education of our young people by offering learning opportunities during the year through 4-H clubs, after-school and in school programs, summer programs and local, state and regional events. A total of 620 youth participated in school and after-school programs covering topics on alcohol and drug abuse, self-esteem, environmental education and healthy eating habits. This past year, youth increased their attendance at district and state level events, and also participated in more leadership and citizenship roles on the district level by 25%. Six 4-H club volunteers were master trained and then taught other volunteers in new program areas, increasing the knowledge of other adult volunteers by 30%. This format of train the trainer will increase the numbers of youth reached across the county, providing positive alternatives for youth to set goals and develop strategies to reach those goals, take leadership in sharing their skills, and increasing their knowledge and talent to make their communities stronger.

Work progressed last year towards the new Anson Agri-Civic Center, with Phase 1 environmental studies completed on the 41-acre parcel and an architectural firm selected to design the 52,000+ square foot facility. To date, $1,645,498 has been committed to the project, including $775,698 in private dollars to help fund the public-private partnership project. Other community development initiatives consisted of the annual Anson Ag Expo & Fair, that brought in over $17,000 in sponsorship funds and approximately 700 participants, and the county's Voluntary and Enhanced Voluntary Agricultural Districts program, with a total of 13,151.73 enrolled acres representing 63 landowners and 188 tracts of land.

The county’s only youth service agency for adjudicated youth is housed within Cooperative Extension, 4-H Youth Promise. This grant-funded program was awarded $108,489 last year from the Juvenile Crime Prevention Council and served a total of 21 youth through the after-school and community service/restitution components. Youth completed 603 hours of community service at different work sites and participated in after-school classes which introduced them to a variety of practical lessons such as improving self-esteem, nutrition, alcohol and drug abuse, anger management, and anti-bullying. In the after-school program, 90% of adjudicated youth successfully completed services, and no new complaints were filed while youth were in the program. 100% of the youth successfully or satisfactorily completed services as intended. The total program saw a 95% successful completion rate last year, and 95% demonstrated improvement in targeted skills in their individual service plan upon completion of their respective program.

II. County Background

Anson County is located in the central, southern region of North Carolina. A rural county, agriculture continues to be the top economic generator for the county. According to the North Carolina Department of Agriculture, there are 429 farms in the county. Their numbers rank Anson as 16th in the state for overall agricultural income. With 65% of the county as timberland, forest production in Anson last year ranked the county 4th in the state. Total income in 2015 was $22,422,577 in forestry. Ag cash receipts in 2014 were $220,872,207, for a total of over $243M.

The county's population hovers around 26,000, with seven townships, and Wadesboro as the county seat at a population of 5,700. In residence, 78% of the population lives in rural areas, with the other 22% in towns. The county is economically distressed and ranks as a Tier I county, with an unemployment rate of 5.5 percent.

Environmental scans to determine community needs utilized formal evaluation methods during programming, input from networking partners, and informal assessments of members of specialized advisory committees. In addition, individual client feedback was utilized, as well as demand for services from our office and public records of on-farm incidents.

The following issues and trends relevant to the agricultural community were identified: fluctuating cattle markets, decreasing commodity prices, emerging technologies in the agriculture sector, an increased interest in new land owners and small scale farming (>10 acres), increased interest in small ruminant production, and increasingly unpredictable weather patterns that effect crops including forages. Beekeeping has a following in the county, as well local foods opportunities and consumer horticulture. The public continues to share an interest in keeping Anson County rural, protecting the environmental resources, and supporting small farms and new farmers.

Family trends in the county include: decreased parental and family involvement of youth which leads to increased behavioral issues, low self-esteem issues and bullying among youth, interest in educating youth about the importance of giving back to their community, older youth wanting to get more involved on a state and regional level, increased interest in food preparation and decreased physical activity.

Current targeted needs include: improvement in best management practices and marketing options for cattle producers, best management practices for forages, including hay and silage production, weed control, and fertilization, increasing participation and community support in youth livestock programs, support for row crop farmers through research trials, specialist connections, educational meetings on new technologies, pesticide education and re-certification opportunities, waste management trainings and managements, as well as on-farm safety training.  Additional needs include classes for beginning beekeepers, diversification opportunities in local foods, information on new crops and suitable variety research, stewardship and protection of rural areas, and farmland preservation for both new farmers and heir property owners.

Youth and family needs include information for parents and youth on service learning curriculum and implementation of projects, better parental and guardian knowledge and skills to provide appropriate structure and responsibility for their children, more hands-on training opportunities, assistance for older youth completing applications for scholarships and ARIE (Application, Resume, Interview and Essay), which is a workforce development and college prep program, nutrition education, and ways to increase physical activity. Also, community requests in support of a new Anson Agri-Civic Center has been overwhelming.

In response to current trends, in the coming year, Anson County Cooperative Extension programs will include pesticide recertification opportunities, a beef cattle regional conference, workshops on beef cattle management through the Anson County Cattlemen's Association, continued support and promotion of the state graded feeder calf sales, tri-county field crops research, field days, production meetings, improvement of the 4-H livestock club, value-added marketing program for livestock including Beef Quality Assurance certifications, management of animal waste plans for hog producers, and safety audits through the Certified Safe Farm Program. A beekeeping introductory class is planned, as well as seasonal pruning classes, site visits and other consumer horticulture programs. The niche market of mushrooms will be explored through classes in varietal mushroom production. Land management education will be offered including forest plans, wildland fires and programs with Sandhills Prescribed Burn Association. Assistance will be given to commercial growers to address pests, identify other marketing opportunities/outlets, and work with aspiring farmers to identify resources and refine their vision, goals, and efforts into comprehensive business plans. Work with the Anson County Voluntary and Enhanced Voluntary Agricultural Districts will also continue.

Youth programs will incorporate a new program component for youth and their parents to learn to better communicate, resist negative influences, appropriately resolve conflict and make better choices for a healthier lifestyle; work one on one with youth completing applications for 4-H scholarships and set up time to work on ARIE with youth; offer workshops to youth on self-esteem and bullying during after school classes; offer trainings on service learning and other 4-H projects by emphasizing both service and learning to create a more meaningful experience for youth; add nutritional and health information for youth and families in backpack buddies; and continue to offer summer programs and through the year programs for enrolled youth. Support will be offered in the areas of nutrition, food preservation and physical fitness. Finally, the Cooperative Extension staff will continue to work with committees in fundraising and facility planning for the new Anson Agri-Civic Center.

As the county's link to North Carolina State University and NC A&T State University, the Anson County Center and staff of NC Cooperative Extension are committed to providing quality educational programs that are relevant to the county. This working document outlines some of those programs and Extension's plan of work for the next year.

III. Objectives to Address the Cooperative Extension Long Range Plan

North Carolina's plant production systems will become more profitable and sustainable.

Value* Outcome Description
515Number of crop (all plant systems) producers increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, and/or skills as related to: 1. Best management production practices (cultural, nutrient, and genetics) 2. Pest/insect, disease, weed, wildlife management 3. Financial/Farm management tools and practices (business, marketing, government policy, human resources) 4. Alternative agriculture, bioenergy, and value-added enterprises
13Number of Extension initiated and controlled County demonstration test sites (new required for GLF/PSI reporting)
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
344Number of crop (all plant systems) producers adopting best management practices, including those practices related to nutrient management, conservation, production, cultivars, pest management (weeds, diseases, insects), business management, and marketing
1580600Net income gains realized by the adoption of best management practices, including those practices related to nutrient management, conservation, production, cultivars, pest management (weeds, diseases, insects), business management, and marketing
186Number of producers reporting increased dollar returns per acre or reduced costs per acre
85Number of producers reporting reduction in fertilizer used per acre
49650Number of acres in conservation tillage or other Best Management Practice
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

North Carolina's animal production systems will become more profitable and sustainable.

Value* Outcome Description
678Number of animal producers increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, and/or skills as related to: 1. Best management production practices (cultural, nutrient, and genetics) 2. Pest/insect, disease, weed, wildlife management 3. Financial/Farm management tools and practices (business, marketing, government policy, human resources) 4. Alternative agriculture, bioenergy, and value-added enterprises
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
27Number of animal producers adopting Extension-recommended best management practices, including those practices related to husbandry, improved planning, marketing, and financial practices
6Number of animal producers implementing Extension-recommended best management practices for animal waste management
5000Tons of livestock organic by-products utilized (nutrients from waste, compost, etc)
14Number of waste management certifications gained or maintained due to Extension education efforts
350Number of acres where Extension-recommended waste analysis was used for proper land application
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Producers will increase sales of food locally to more agriculturally aware consumers through market development, producer and consumer education, and new farmer and infrastructure support.

Value* Outcome Description
30Number of producers who gain skills or knowledge to increase production for local markets.
600Number of adults (including producers, food business owners, etc.) who improved knowledge of local food and agricultural systems.
190Number of children/youth who improved knowledge of local food and agricultural systems.
60Number of producers who improve local food marketing skills or knowledge.
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
2Number of new and existing access points for consumers that expand or improve their offering of local fruits and vegetables. Access points include farmers markets, retail stores, school food programs, community gardens, institutions other than schools (e.g. hospitals, universities, etc.), and other systems/access points not noted (e.g. restaurants, etc.).
15Number of producers selling their agricultural products to local markets (direct, intermediated/food service, institutional) for consumption in NC.
700000Gross sales of local foods by producers. (Increase in gross sales to be calculated at the state level.)
45Number of producers (and other members of the local food supply chain) who have increased revenue.
15Number of new farms (beginning farmers) selling into local markets for local consumption (in this reporting period).
60Number of youth who grow food in school gardens.
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Agricultural producers, workers, food handlers and consumers will adopt safer food and agricultural production, handling, and distribution practices that reduce workplace and home injuries/illnesses, enhance food security, and increase the quality and safety of food that North Carolinians prepare and consume.

Value* Outcome Description
96Number of commercial/public operators trained
12Number of pesticide application credit hours provided
3Number of persons certified in Pork Quality Assurance (PQA) or Beef Quality Assurance (BQA)
1Number of persons certified in Transport Quality Assurance (TQA)
21Number of participants participating in AgriSafe personal protective equipment (PPE) selection or fit testing
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Individuals and groups will acquire leadership and decision making capacities needed to guide and actively participate in local and state organizations.

Value* Outcome Description
38Number of adults increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
42Number of adults assuming new/expanded leadership roles in the community
123Number of youth increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
96Number of youth assuming new/expanded leadership roles in the community
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
42Number of adults increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
43Number of adults assuming new/expanded leadership roles in the community
123Number of youth increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
123Number of youth assuming new/expanded leadership roles in the community
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Youth and adults will address community issues and/or challenges through volunteerism.

Value* Outcome Description
34Number of adult participants acquiring the skills needed to serve as a volunteer
52Number of youth participants reporting aspirations to serve in new or expanded volunteer roles in community
34Number of adult participants reporting aspirations to serve in new or expanded volunteer roles in community
383Number of hours adult volunteer training conducted
4Number of hours youth volunteer training conducted
8Number new volunteers recruited
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
2Increased number of hours contributed by trained youth volunteers
10Increased number of hours contributed by trained adult volunteers
5Number of youth volunteers serving in new or expanded roles within Extension
3Number of adult volunteers serving in new or expanded roles within Extension
2Number of adult volunteers serving in new or expanded roles beyond Extension, including community boards and task forces
2Number of youth volunteers recruiting and/or training new volunteers
6Number of adult volunteers recruiting and/or training new volunteers
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Community members, organizations and local government will engage in collaborative dialog and decision-making to build economically, socially and environmentally resilient communities. This will be done through inclusive engagement, partnership building, and/or community planning.

Value* Outcome Description
379Number of participants increasing knowledge and skills in convening and leading inclusive, representative groups (including limited resources, new resident, or immigrant groups) for evidence based community development
167Number of participants developing skills in leading community, economic, and/or disaster planning and change
152Number of participants who increased their awareness, knowledge or skill in business related topics (e.g., management, product development, marketing, business structure options, business law and/or liability)
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
124Number of participants who report new or expanded leadership roles and opportunities undertaken
156354Dollar value of in-kind resources (funding, in-kind service or volunteers) contributed to Projects or Programs in which Extension was critically involved by an organization or community to support community or economic development work
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Futures that Work: School to Career Pathways

Value* Outcome Description
6Number of teachers trained in 4-H STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) curriculum
543Number of youth (students) increasing knowledge in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math)
365Total number of female participants in STEM program
49Number of youth (students) participating in 4-H dropout prevention (student at-risk) programs
101Number of high school age youth (students) participating as members of 4-H clubs
441Number of youth (students) increasing knowledge of career/employability skills
36Number of adults increasing knowledge of career/employability skills
543Number of youth (students) increasing knowledge of entrepreneurship
30Number of adults increasing knowledge of entrepreneurship
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
9Number of teachers using 4-H STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) curriculum in their classrooms
441Number of youth (students) gaining knowledge in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math)
68Number of youth (students) gaining career / employability skills
12Number of adults gaining career / employability skills
441Number of youth (students) gaining entrepreneurship skills
24Number of adults gaining entrepreneurship skills
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

North Carolinians will make decisions and adopt practices that implement effective resource protection and conservation.

Value* Outcome Description
405Number of participants increasing their knowledge about best management practices
205Number of child and youth educators aspiring to implement quality outdoor learning environments for children
840Number of youth and adults demonstrating increased knowledge of natural resources and environmental issues
470Number of youth willing to participate in conservation actions
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Consumers and communities will enhance the value of plants, animals, and landscapes while conserving valuable natural resources and protecting the environment.

Value* Outcome Description
900Number of participants improving knowledge, attitude, skills and aspirations regarding gardening and landscape practices including plant selection and placement, turfgrass management, soil management, growing food, water conservation and water quality preservation, storm water and erosion management, green waste management, pest and wildlife management
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
900Number of participants who use extension-recommended best management practices in landscapes, turf, and gardens, including pest (insect, weed, disease) management, fertility management, water conservation, water quality preservation and pruning techniques
6200Total cost savings from the use of extension-recommended best management practices in landscapes, turf, and gardens, including pest (insect, weed, disease) management, fertility management, water conservation, water quality preservation and pruning techniques
2500Number of participants who use extension-recommended pest management practices in homes, public facilities, businesses or in community pest management programs
7000Cost savings from using extension-recommended pest management practices in homes, public facilities, businesses or in community pest management programs
850Number of participants selecting appropriate landscape plants (adapted, drought tolerant, appropriate size, etc.)
7000Cost savings from the appropriate selection of landscape plants
600Number of participants growing food for home consumption
8000Value of produce grown for home consumption
25Number of participants adopting composting
5Reduced tonnage of greenwaste as a result of Extension-recommended practices including composting and proper plant selection
125Number of participants implementing extension-recommended practices to conserve water use and protect water qualty
3500Costs savings from implementing extension-recommended practices to conserve water use and protect water qualtiy
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Youth and adult program participants will make healthy food choices, achieve the recommended amount of physical activity and reduce risk factors for chronic diseases.

Value* Impact Description
299Number of adults increasing their fruit and vegetables consumption
1134Number of youth increasing their fruit and vegetable consumption
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

IV. Number of Contacts Made by Extension

Type of ContactNumber
Face-to-face* 8,348
Non face-to-face** 22,226
Total by Extension staff in 2017 30,574
* Face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make directly with individuals through one-on-one visits, meetings, and other activities where staff members work directly with individuals.
** Non face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make indirectly with individuals by telephone, email, newsletters, news articles, radio, television, and other means.

V. Designated Grants Received by Extension

Type of GrantAmount
Contracts/Grants $25,315.00
Gifts/Donations $96,002.00
In-Kind Grants/Donations $13,335.00
United Way/Foundations $370.00
User Fees $3,222.00
Total $138,244.00

VI. Volunteer Involvement in Extension Programs

Number of Volunteers* Number of Volunteer Hours Known client contacts by volunteers Dollar Value at 24.69
4-H: 122 2,546 865 $ 62,861.00
Advisory Leadership System: 69 156 0 $ 3,852.00
Extension Community Association: 4 4 2 $ 99.00
Extension Master Gardener: 0 0 0 $ 0.00
Other: 261 682 136 $ 16,839.00
Total: 456 3388 1003 $ 83,650.00
* The number of volunteers reflects the overall number of volunteers for multiple events.

VII. Membership of Advisory Leadership System

Anson County Cooperative Extension Advisory Council
Sharon Edwards, Chair
Beth Rogers, Vice Chair
Pam Layfield, Secretary
Eloise Harrington
Lee Roy Lookabill
Pearl Blount
Ronnie Morgan
John Springer
Charlie Little
Jimmy Sturdivant
Lewis Evans
Margaret Ridenhour
Betty Garris
Janet Gilreath
Mark Mills
Roddy Purser
Bobby Sikes
Ruth Ann Pope
CRD Program Committee
Emmett Patterson
Eloise Harrington
Lee Roy Lookabill
Lewis Evans
Beef Production Program Comittee
Lannie Allen
Ronnie Morgan
Mark Mills
Ronnie Mills
Poultry Program Area Committee
Roddy Purser
Tommy Edwards
Eddie Edwards
Mike Livingston
Crops Program Committee
Fincher Martin
Dale McRae
John Springer
Bobby Sikes
Horticulture Program Committee
Eddie Maye
H.L. Carpenter
Charlie Ann Carpenter
Jimmy Sturdivant
Natural Resources Program Committee
Janet Gilreath
Jim Little
Jason Miller
Family & Consumer Sciences Program Committee
Peg Pinkston
Ruth Ann Pope
Beth Rogers
Catherine Bennett
Cindy Taylor-Kupfer
4-H & Youth Program Committee
Pearl Blount
Betty Garris
Katie Edwards
Sharon Edwards
Margaret Ridenhour
Chris Stinson
Charlie Little
Pam Layfield

VIII. Staff Membership

Roshunda Terry
Title: County Extension Director
Phone: (704) 694-2915
Email: roshunda_terry@ncsu.edu

Candice Christian
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Consumer and Retail Food Safety
Phone: (919) 515-9148
Email: Candice_Christian@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: The overall goal of the Area Specialized Agents (ASAs) in Consumer & Retail Food Safety is to support FCS Agents in delivering timely and evidence-based food safety education and information to stakeholders in North Carolina.

Sam Cole
Title: Program Director, 4-H Youth Promise
Phone: (704) 694-2915
Email: srcole3@ncsu.edu

Aimee Colf
Title: Extension Agent, Agriculture - Horticulture and Forestry
Phone: (704) 694-2415
Email: aimee_colf@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Horticulture, forestry, beekeeping, local foods coordinator, Anson County Voluntary Ag District

Marti Day
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Dairy
Phone: (919) 542-8202
Email: marti_day@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Responsible for educational programs for dairy farmers, youth with an interest in dairy projects and the general public with an interest in dairy foods and the dairy industry.

Richard Goforth
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Poultry
Phone: (704) 283-3801
Email: richard_goforth@ncsu.edu

Marissa Herchler
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Animal Food Safety (FSMA Programs)
Phone: (919) 515-5396
Email: marissa_herchler@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Marissa is an Area Specialized Agent for animal food safety, with emphasis on the new Food Safety Modernization Act rules, as they apply to feed mills in North Carolina. Please contact Marissa with any FSMA related questions, or PCQI training inquiries.

Quan Johnson
Title: Case Manager, 4-H Youth Promise
Phone: (704) 694-2915
Email: qldumas@ncsu.edu

Stacey Jones
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Commercial Nursery and Greenhouse
Phone: (704) 920-3310
Email: stacey_jones@ncsu.edu

Pam Layfield
Title: County Extension Administrative Assistant
Phone: (704) 694-2415
Email: pam_layfield@ncsu.edu

Bill Lord
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Water Resources
Phone: (919) 496-3344
Email: william_lord@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Water quality education and technical assistance

Aaron Moore
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Small Farms
Phone: (704) 283-3743
Email: jamoore3@ncsu.edu

Currey Nobles
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Food Safety
Phone: (919) 515-9520
Email: canobles@ncsu.edu

Elena Rogers
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Food Safety - Fresh Produce Western NC
Phone: (828) 352-2519
Email: elena_rogers@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provide educational programs, training and technical support focusing on fresh produce safety to Agents and growers in Western NC.

Allan Thornton
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Commercial Vegetables and Fruits
Phone: (910) 592-7161
Email: allan_thornton@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Vegetable Extension Specialist. Conducts Extension and applied research programs for commercial vegetable and fruit growers and agents in eastern North Carolina.

Mitch Woodward
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Watersheds and Water Quality
Phone: (919) 250-1112
Email: mdwoodwa@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: NC Cooperative Extension's Goals include: - NC's natural resources and environmental quality will be protected, conserved and enhanced. - NC will have profitable, environmentally sustainable plant, animal and food systems. Protecting our environmental resources, particularly drinking water quality, is a top priority in NC. NC Cooperative Extension is a leader in teaching, researching, and accelerating the adoption of effective water quality protection practices.

IX. Contact Information

Anson County Center
501 McLaurin St
Wadesboro, NC 28170

Phone: (704) 694-2915
Fax: (704) 694-2248
URL: http://anson.ces.ncsu.edu