2017 Greene County Program Impact Report

Approved: January 23, 2018

I. Executive Summary

In 2017, Greene County Extension staff reported 33,338 face-to-face contacts, 16,783 non-face to face contacts, $29,612.50.00 in fiscal resources, and a total of 3,483 volunteer hours. News articles (59) printed showed a circulation of 218,300 and 110,000 website visits. Social media and mass media efforts resulted in showing an impact of reaching over 208,000 audiences by television and cable programming. Pesticide education remains an emerging issue of protective fumigant spraying. Two-hundred and ten livestock farmers received animal waste training, one-hundred eighty were re-certified and 30 received new certifications due to the new EPA licensing requirements. Due to the high volume of animal farms, waste management education continues to be a high priority when it comes to irrigation of crops and avoiding regulatory repercussions. Ten congregate meal site food handlers received ServSafe food safety training and five were re-certified. Eight SHIIP (Seniors Health Insurance and Information Program) volunteers received quarterly training and four received new certifications.

Greene County Extension secured funding from Resourceful Communities ($7,000) to assist Greene County Master Gardeners maintain the community garden. A six month internship was created for a rising senior interested in a horticulture career with North Carolina Cooperative Extension. Results from the internship showed capacity building among six gardeners, increased knowledge of horticulture education, higher garden produce yields, becoming more physically active and saving food dollars. The Local Foods program is constantly striving to remain sustainable through grants and local donations. The Rural Advancement Foundation, Inc., funded the Fresh Bucks pilot program to extend the value of the EBT and physical activity. (Electronics Benefit Program) offered to low-income families to increase their fruit and vegetable intake by purchasing local produce at the farmers' market. Survey results showed a ten percent increase in fruit and vegetable intake among low income families and increased profits of two produce farmers by five percent. Net income from sales of locally produced agriculture products to local market in 2017 totaled $50,000 and customer participation increased by five percent at the farmer’s market due to the Fresh Bucks program funded by RAFI (Rural Advancement Foundation International). Greene Community Garden volunteers donated over 684 pounds of fresh produce to the local Interfaith Food Shelter and Senior Center to over one-hundred families. Food insecurity among families in Greene County continues to be a need to address with the help of other county agencies.

Obesity rates in Greene County averaged thirty-five percent of adults (2017 County Health Rankings) and twenty-five percent of children and youth ages 2-19. Efforts to address obesity and related health issues in older adults resulted a partnership with Greene County Senior Center. The Better Choices Program, a SNAP-ED program for older adults focused on adding more fruits and vegetables to the diet and showed that eighty-five percent improved their dietary intake by increasing their fruit and vegetable consumption and improved food resource management skills. NC A&T State University's Snap-Ed Agent partnered with Family Literacy, Greene County Schools, Senior Center and Housing Authorities to educate low-income families and individuals about the need to make healthier food choices, make sound financial management decisions and become more physically active to reduce their risk of chronic illnesses.

The Greene County 4-H program reached a total of 1,002 youth participating in clubs, summer camps, district events, shooting sports, state and national events and school enrichment activities. The Down East Dairy Project at Simply Natural Farm and Creamery resulted in fifty children participating for seven weeks, learning about the dairy industry, caring for their calf, and preparing for a livestock show. Parents reported that this project allows their family to have a true farm experience with very little expense and taught the children responsibility, confidence, cooperation and respect. The 4-H program continues to focus efforts on building and recruiting new club leaders and volunteers improving the knowledge of youth towards agricultural systems and leadership skills. The 4-H Greene Chicks Program, a partnership with the Pre-K Center and Harper Landscaping Company resulted in educating twenty-five four-year old children about how to hatch eggs, and the life cycle of a chicken. Each youth participated in the show. Parent evaluations resulted in ninety-three percent of youth reporting responsibility, eighty percent increased their confidence, and seventy-three percent increased family time.

Forty-six percent of youth assessed by the Department of Public Safety, Division of Juvenile Justice have moderate to serious behavior problems (affrays, assaults, disorderly conduct, drug/alcohol offenses, larceny, weapons on campus) at school resulting in referrals to the juvenile and district court system. To address the need, juveniles participating in Greene County Teen Court and Restitution received help in dealing with their negative behavior through completion of educational activities, community service and jury duty. Approximately, seventy-five percent of the youth who successfully completed the Teen Court Program did not return to the court system in the year following participation in the program. Extension's Juvenile Justice program saved Greene County and the State of NC over $2.2 million by utilizing the Greene County Teen Court Program as an alternative for handling minor criminal behavior.

SHIIP (Seniors Health Information and Insurance Program) volunteers, Greene County Senior Center, local pharmacies, Greene County Health Care, and NC Department of Insurance partnered to assist Medicare beneficiaries in choosing affordable prescription drug plans. In 2017, nine hundred Medicare beneficiaries saved over $121,000 in prescription drug costs, Medicare supplement plan costs and Medicare health plan premiums.

II. County Background

Per the US Census Bureau, the 2015 estimated population of Greene County 21,093 and is comprised of five townships. The county's largest population groups are identified as 59.2% white, 36.6% Black, 14.7% Hispanic or Latino. The number of families living in poverty has increased from 23.5% to 27.1% with 35.6% being children and youth. One-hundred percent of school-aged children eat free or reduced lunches. There are 8,125 households with a median income of $40,853. Fifteen percent of the population are elderly, 76% of adults 25 years or older have a high school education or more and twelve percent have a bachelor's degree or more.

Greene County is a rural agriculture dependent county with 101,189 acres in farms. Per the 2015 NCAS (North Carolina Agriculture Statistics), data reported farm income of $284.5 million. Poultry, dairy and livestock reported ($172,343,224) in cash receipts. Flue cured tobacco (7,000 acres) and sweet potatoes (5,300 acres) remains the leading field crops in the county. Greene County has a small manufacturing base, with the trend being the development of small retail businesses niche markets, food establishments and agribusinesses.

The local foods program in Greene County is expanding more towards roadside stands and niche markets, showing that the local foods movement is improving contributing an increase in the county tax base and revenues. Local gardeners rent garden beds for ten dollars a year to grow their own produce to supplement their current diets and to lower their food costs. The mission of the garden is to give back at least 10% to the local Interfaith Food Shelter which provides food for 900 families monthly. Limited-resource families and food-insecure individuals will be provided opportunities to enhance their household food, diet and nutrition status by growing or purchasing local foods. Extension agents will plan and implement farm food safety educational programs for producers to assist them in sustaining their heritage farms by keeping up to date with the new Food Safety Modernization Act.

Heart disease, cancer and diabetes are among the major chronic diseases in Greene County; higher than the state rate. With the older adult population in Greene County steadily rising, programs to address chronic illnesses will be implemented to help combat health issues such as: obesity, high blood pressure, diabetes and strokes. Partnerships with other agencies will help to provide resources for programming needs for limited and unlimited resource families.

Greene County 4-H youth programs will provide opportunities for all youth to improve their level of education, social, public speaking, technology and leadership development skills so that they may become a productive, competitive member of society. Twenty-two percent of children under 18 years old living in Greene County. The number of children attending elementary, middle, high school, early college and the Alternative School totaled 4,800 in 2016. Teens committing minor criminal behaviors in school increases each year in Greene County and programming provided by the Division of Juvenile Justice saves the county thousands of dollars through the Teen Court Program and Juvenile Restitution.

Prescription drugs and insurance premium costs continue to increase for Medicare beneficiaries. Extension coordinates with the Greene County Senior Center, pharmacists, community health centers and NC Department of Insurance to deliver counseling sessions and outreach to Medicare beneficiaries to assist them in choosing affordable prescription drug plans that are affordable.

Extension agents and program assistants will address the above needs by offering research based information programs. In partnering with other county agencies Extension can extend resources, funding and provide solutions to the many needs that county residents face.

III. Objectives to Address the Cooperative Extension Long Range Plan

North Carolina's plant production systems will become more profitable and sustainable.

Value* Outcome Description
313Number of crop (all plant systems) producers increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, and/or skills as related to: 1. Best management production practices (cultural, nutrient, and genetics) 2. Pest/insect, disease, weed, wildlife management 3. Financial/Farm management tools and practices (business, marketing, government policy, human resources) 4. Alternative agriculture, bioenergy, and value-added enterprises
14Number of Extension initiated and controlled County demonstration test sites (new required for GLF/PSI reporting)
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
313Number of crop (all plant systems) producers adopting best management practices, including those practices related to nutrient management, conservation, production, cultivars, pest management (weeds, diseases, insects), business management, and marketing
500000Net income gains realized by the adoption of best management practices, including those practices related to nutrient management, conservation, production, cultivars, pest management (weeds, diseases, insects), business management, and marketing
80Number of producers reporting increased dollar returns per acre or reduced costs per acre
80Number of producers reporting reduction in fertilizer used per acre
8000Number of acres in conservation tillage or other Best Management Practice
4Number of producers who adopted a dedicated bioenergy crop
450Number of acres planted to a dedicated bioenergy crop
1350Tons of feedstock delivered to processor
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

North Carolina's animal production systems will become more profitable and sustainable.

Value* Outcome Description
205Number of animal producers increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, and/or skills as related to: 1. Best management production practices (cultural, nutrient, and genetics) 2. Pest/insect, disease, weed, wildlife management 3. Financial/Farm management tools and practices (business, marketing, government policy, human resources) 4. Alternative agriculture, bioenergy, and value-added enterprises
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
99Number of animal producers adopting Extension-recommended best management practices, including those practices related to husbandry, improved planning, marketing, and financial practices
23Number of animal producers implementing Extension-recommended best management practices for animal waste management
2950000Net income gain by using livestock organic by-products instead of synthetic fertilizers
198Number of waste management certifications gained or maintained due to Extension education efforts
32895Number of acres where Extension-recommended waste analysis was used for proper land application
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Producers will increase sales of food locally to more agriculturally aware consumers through market development, producer and consumer education, and new farmer and infrastructure support.

Value* Outcome Description
20Number of producers who gain skills or knowledge to increase production for local markets.
16Number of adults (including producers, food business owners, etc.) who improved knowledge of local food and agricultural systems.
29Number of children/youth who improved knowledge of local food and agricultural systems.
40Number of individuals who gain knowledge or acquire skills related to vegetable/fruit gardening, and if also reporting under Urban and Consumer Agriculture Objective, divide up the reported number appropriately between the two objectives to avoid duplication.
13Number of producers who improve local food marketing skills or knowledge.
41Number of individuals who learn how to prepare local foods, including through use of home food preservation techniques.
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
7Number of new and existing access points for consumers that expand or improve their offering of local fruits and vegetables. Access points include farmers markets, retail stores, school food programs, community gardens, institutions other than schools (e.g. hospitals, universities, etc.), and other systems/access points not noted (e.g. restaurants, etc.).
5Number of producers selling their agricultural products to local markets (direct, intermediated/food service, institutional) for consumption in NC.
4Number of producers who diversified their marketing strategies into local markets (direct, intermediated/food service, institutional).
32000Gross sales of local foods by producers. (Increase in gross sales to be calculated at the state level.)
18Number of producers (and other members of the local food supply chain) who have increased revenue.
18Number of new farms (beginning farmers) selling into local markets for local consumption (in this reporting period).
37Number of individuals who grow food in community gardens.
770Number of pounds of local foods donated for consumption by vulnerable populations.
165Number of youth who grow food in school gardens.
0Number of individuals who begin home food production by starting a vegetable and/or fruit garden, and if also reporting under Urban and Consumer Horticulture Objective, divide up the reported number appropriately between the two objectives to avoid duplication.
17Number of individuals who begin home food production by starting to raise backyard livestock.
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Agricultural producers, workers, food handlers and consumers will adopt safer food and agricultural production, handling, and distribution practices that reduce workplace and home injuries/illnesses, enhance food security, and increase the quality and safety of food that North Carolinians prepare and consume.

Value* Outcome Description
421Number of commercial/public operators trained
22Number of pesticide application credit hours provided
34Number of participants participating in AgriSafe personal protective equipment (PPE) selection or fit testing
6Number of participants trained in Growing Safer Gardens
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
7Number of persons certified in Good Agricultural Practices (GAPs) or Good Handling Practices (GHPs)
7Number of participants developing food safety plans
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Individuals and groups will acquire leadership and decision making capacities needed to guide and actively participate in local and state organizations.

Value* Outcome Description
26Number of adults increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
4Number of adults assuming new/expanded leadership roles in the community
9Number of youth increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
2Number of youth assuming new/expanded leadership roles in the community
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
26Number of adults increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
4Number of adults assuming new/expanded leadership roles in the community
9Number of youth increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
2Number of youth assuming new/expanded leadership roles in the community
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Youth and adults will address community issues and/or challenges through volunteerism.

Value* Outcome Description
139Number of adult participants acquiring the skills needed to serve as a volunteer
17Number of youth participants reporting aspirations to serve in new or expanded volunteer roles in community
28Number of adult participants reporting aspirations to serve in new or expanded volunteer roles in community
171Number of hours adult volunteer training conducted
64Number of hours youth volunteer training conducted
53Number new volunteers recruited
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
316Increased number of hours contributed by trained youth volunteers
1048Increased number of hours contributed by trained adult volunteers
17Number of youth volunteers serving in new or expanded roles within Extension
27Number of adult volunteers serving in new or expanded roles within Extension
6Number of youth volunteers serving in new or expanded roles beyond Extension, including community boards and task forces
40Number of adult volunteers serving in new or expanded roles beyond Extension, including community boards and task forces
56Number of youth volunteers recruiting and/or training new volunteers
22Number of adult volunteers recruiting and/or training new volunteers
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Community members, organizations and local government will engage in collaborative dialog and decision-making to build economically, socially and environmentally resilient communities. This will be done through inclusive engagement, partnership building, and/or community planning.

Value* Outcome Description
45Number of participants developing skills in leading community, economic, and/or disaster planning and change
5Number of communities that have included agricultural and food system considerations into disaster preparedness plans or procedures due to Extension’s involvement
3300Number of residents that increase their knowledge in disaster preparedness planning, mitigation and recovery
4Number of participants who increased their awareness, knowledge or skill in business related topics (e.g., management, product development, marketing, business structure options, business law and/or liability)
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
4Number of businesses created, retained, or expanded due to Extension’s community and economic development programming
379Number of participants who adopted disaster preparedness and mitigation practices
2Number of participants who report new or expanded leadership roles and opportunities undertaken
16600Dollar value of in-kind resources (funding, in-kind service or volunteers) contributed to Projects or Programs in which Extension was critically involved by an organization or community to support community or economic development work
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Futures that Work: School to Career Pathways

Youth and adult program participants will make healthy food choices, achieve the recommended amount of physical activity and reduce risk factors for chronic diseases.

Value* Impact Description
1242Number of adults increasing their fruit and vegetables consumption
193Number of participants increasing their physical activity
130Number of participants reducing their BMI
134Number of adults who reduce their blood pressure
35Number of adults who improve their blood glucose (A1c.)level
55Number of adults who reduce their total cholesterol
110Number of participants who consume less sodium in their diet
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

IV. Number of Contacts Made by Extension

Type of ContactNumber
Face-to-face* 12,591
Non face-to-face** 23,212
Total by Extension staff in 2017 35,803
* Face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make directly with individuals through one-on-one visits, meetings, and other activities where staff members work directly with individuals.
** Non face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make indirectly with individuals by telephone, email, newsletters, news articles, radio, television, and other means.

V. Designated Grants Received by Extension

Type of GrantAmount
Contracts/Grants $19,862.50
Gifts/Donations $7,700.00
In-Kind Grants/Donations $800.00
United Way/Foundations $0.00
User Fees $1,250.00
Total $29,612.50

VI. Volunteer Involvement in Extension Programs

Number of Volunteers* Number of Volunteer Hours Known client contacts by volunteers Dollar Value at 24.69
4-H: 162 1,407 4,489 $ 34,739.00
Advisory Leadership System: 0 0 0 $ 0.00
Extension Community Association: 0 0 0 $ 0.00
Extension Master Gardener: 28 268 60 $ 6,617.00
Other: 198 1,808 1,028 $ 44,640.00
Total: 388 3483 5577 $ 85,995.00
* The number of volunteers reflects the overall number of volunteers for multiple events.

VII. Membership of Advisory Leadership System

Advisory Council
Jasper Barfield
Billy Dail
Jack Edmondson, Jr.
Larry Holloway
Parmilla Edwards
William Sugg, III
Patricia Adams
Sharon Harrison
Helen Hill
Johnny McLawhorn
James Shackleford
Family & Consumer Science Specialized Committee
Parmilla Edwards
Cathy Dail
Gwenoese Smith
Taylor Bowen
Eric Miller
Angela Ellis
Doris Jones
4-H Advisory Program Committee
Ashley Campbell
Chris Campbell
Rose McLaughlin
Susan Hubbard
Christin Beaman
Hosea Garcia
Mike Anderson
Farmers Market Advisory Board
Sandra Warren
Charles Lanier
Mary Betty Kearney
Natalie Relyea,Chairman
Johnny B. McLawhorn
Rog Thagard
Kim Hoskins
Voluntary Ag District Committee
Ed Sugg
Mike Gay
Todd Pellitier
Audie Murphy
Ralph Noble
Jerry Jones
Frankie Beaman
Chris Murphy
Jerry Cunningham
Livestock Program Committee
Jack Cunningham
John B. McLawhorn,Sr.
Frankie Beaman
David Lanier
Billy Dail
JCPC Advisory Program Committee
James Fulghum
Pam Stokes
Jennifer Short
Pam Stokes
Michael Rhodes
Elizabeth Heath
June Cummings
Darlene Lang-Koonce
Master Gardener Association
Gene Riddle
David Jones
Brenda Blackmon
Patricia Adams
Karla Jennings
Marjorie Suggs
Lawton Suggs
Roy Thagard

Ag Specialized Program Committee
Brian Lovitt
Chris Jernigan
Jordan Rouse
Brooks Edmondson
Rory Wood, Jr.
Larry Cobb
Michael Cobb
David Jones
Farm Bureau Committee
Mike Gay
Johnny McLawhorn,Sr.
Johnny B. McLawhorn Jr.
Jerry Cunningham
Jerry Jones
Pat Harris
Ricky Moore
Stan Dixon
Tina Murphy
Dawn Murphy
Milo Lewis
Matt Gay
Brooks Edmondson
Frankie Beamon
Mike Hardy
Audie Murphy
Heather Harper
Jimmy Dail
Ted Harris
James Shackleford

VIII. Staff Membership

Shenile Ford
Title: County Extension Director
Phone: (252) 747-5831
Email: shenile_ford@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Responsibilities include: Administration, Community Development,(FCS)-Local Foods

Coleman Becton
Title: Extension Agent, 4-H Youth Development
Phone: (252) 747-5831
Email: coleman_becton@ncsu.edu

Shelina Bonner
Title: Family & Consumer Sciences Agent
Phone: (252) 747-5831
Email: shelina_bonner@ncsu.edu

Candice Christian
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Consumer and Retail Food Safety
Phone: (919) 515-9148
Email: Candice_Christian@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: The overall goal of the Area Specialized Agents (ASAs) in Consumer & Retail Food Safety is to support FCS Agents in delivering timely and evidence-based food safety education and information to stakeholders in North Carolina.

Marti Day
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Dairy
Phone: (919) 542-8202
Email: marti_day@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Responsible for educational programs for dairy farmers, youth with an interest in dairy projects and the general public with an interest in dairy foods and the dairy industry.

Mike Frinsko
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Aquaculture
Phone: (252) 448-9621
Email: mike_frinsko@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provide technical training and assistance to commercial aquaculture producers in the Southeast Extension District

Marissa Herchler
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Animal Food Safety (FSMA Programs)
Phone: (919) 515-5396
Email: marissa_herchler@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Marissa is an Area Specialized Agent for animal food safety, with emphasis on the new Food Safety Modernization Act rules, as they apply to feed mills in North Carolina. Please contact Marissa with any FSMA related questions, or PCQI training inquiries.

Eve Honeycutt
Title: Extension Agent, Agriculture - Livestock, Lenoir and Greene
Phone: (252) 521-1706
Email: eve_honeycutt@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Develop quality programs for Greene and Lenoir Counties relating to Animal Waste Management, Livestock Production, and Forages.

Kim Hoskins
Title: County Extension Administrative Assistant
Phone: (252) 747-5831
Email: kim_hoskins@ncsu.edu

Missy Jernigan
Title: Program Assistant, 4-H Youth Development
Phone: (252) 747-5831
Email: mkjernig@ncsu.edu

Lynette Johnston
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Food Safety
Phone: (919) 515-0303
Email: lynette_johnston@ncsu.edu

Colby Lambert
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Forestry
Phone: (910) 814-6041
Email: colby_lambert@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provides educational opportunities and technical support to forest landowners, agents, and forest industry in eastern North Carolina.

Jo Langley
Title: County Extension Support Specialist
Phone: (252) 747-5831
Email: jo_langley@ncsu.edu

Danny Lauderdale
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Nursery and Greenhouse, Eastern Region
Phone: (252) 237-0111
Email: danny_lauderdale@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provides programming to commercial ornamental nursery and greenhouse producers in eastern North Carolina.

Bill Lord
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Water Resources
Phone: (919) 496-3344
Email: william_lord@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Water quality education and technical assistance

Stephanie McDonald-Murray
Title: Regional Nutrition Extension Associate - Southeast EFNEP and SNAP-Ed
Phone: (910) 296-2143
Email: stephanie_mcdonald@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Job Description: Provides programmatic supervision to the EFNEP program in the South East District.

Lauren Pace
Title: Program Coordinator, Juvenile Restitution & Teen Court
Phone: (747) -58-31
Email: lapace@ncsu.edu

Diana Rashash
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Water Quality/Waste Management
Phone: (910) 455-5873
Email: diana_rashash@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Water and wastewater issues of all types: stormwater, aquatic weed ID & control, water quality & quantity, septic systems, animal waste, land application of wastewater, environment & sustainability, climate, etc.

Margaret Ross
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Poultry
Phone: (252) 670-8254
Email: margaret_ross@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Working with commercial poultry producers to assist in writing nutrient management plans and conducting educational programming.

Chip Simmons
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Food Safety
Phone: (919) 414-5632
Email: odsimmon@ncsu.edu

Wesley Stallings
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture- Grain Crops
Phone: (910) 455-5873
Email: wcstalli@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Agriculture-Grain Crops

Allan Thornton
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Commercial Vegetables and Fruits
Phone: (910) 592-7161
Email: allan_thornton@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Vegetable Extension Specialist. Conducts Extension and applied research programs for commercial vegetable and fruit growers and agents in eastern North Carolina.

Scott Tilley
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Field Crops
Phone: (252) 793-4428
Email: scott_tilley@ncsu.edu

Grayson Wells
Title: Extension Agent, Agriculture - Field Crops
Phone: (252) 747-5831
Email: sgwells@ncsu.edu

Mitch Woodward
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Watersheds and Water Quality
Phone: (919) 250-1112
Email: mdwoodwa@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: NC Cooperative Extension's Goals include: - NC's natural resources and environmental quality will be protected, conserved and enhanced. - NC will have profitable, environmentally sustainable plant, animal and food systems. Protecting our environmental resources, particularly drinking water quality, is a top priority in NC. NC Cooperative Extension is a leader in teaching, researching, and accelerating the adoption of effective water quality protection practices.

IX. Contact Information

Greene County Center
229 Kingold Blvd
Suite E
Snow Hill, NC 28580

Phone: (252) 747-5831
Fax: (252) 747-7024
URL: http://greene.ces.ncsu.edu