2018 Guilford County Plan of Work

Approved: January 19, 2018

I. County Background

As part of the eleven-county Piedmont Triad region, Guilford County is centered along the Piedmont industrial crescent stretching from Raleigh to Charlotte. With a population estimated at 517,600 Guilford County is ranked third in the state. Major cities include Greensboro (287,027) and High Point (111,223). Over 117,820 school age youth reside in Guilford County communities. 4-H is a community-builder delivering resources for young people. 4-H partners with young people, families, schools and communities to create dynamic youth development programs and support structures for all young people.

Agriculture continues to be an integral part of Guilford County, blending urban and rural. Of our 413,565 acres in the county, about 96,519 acres are farmland. The 2014 NCDA&CS Agricultural Income for Guilford County is $72.3 million. Top commodities include: hay, grain crops, nursery and greenhouse operations, livestock and horses, but interest in local foods is bringing on a shift in what is being grown on many farms. In 2016 a “Shared Use” Kitchen was established to increase added value products for local farmers and community residents. There is still 15,500 acres of hay that is harvested yearly, ranking us 17th in the state for hay production. Guilford County also ranks 2nd in the state for horses with an equine inventory of 10,940 and value of $66,504,000. There is 14,500 head of cattle which we rank 18th and 1,400 head of milk cows where we rank 7th not to mention the 8,000 hogs. The nursery and greenhouse industry is also still a viable industry with over 10 wholesale nurseries and greenhouses in the county. Issues involving residential and consumer horticulture such as pest management and home food production continue to intensify each year. Cooperative Extension is the only agency designed to provide pesticide applicators training. Now that construction is on the rise, we are experiencing increased landscape investment decision-making as home owners take on "Do-it-Yourself" projects. Water quality and conservation continue to be of a concern. Our farmers and public have become more aware of the economic and environmental impacts that applying pesticides and fertilizers. Emphasis on reduced pesticide and fertilizer use in the Jordan Lake Watershed has increased the need for additional education on more environmentally conscious decisions.

Public interest and concern about nutrition and health issues are at an all-time high. A survey conducted by Gallup for the Food Research and Action Center ranked Greensboro/High Point in the top 10 cities in the nation for the amount of people who say they don't have enough money for food - Food Insecurity. There are 25 food deserts that have been identified in Guilford County. Community/School gardens and FoodCorps programs are addressing this concern. While more consumers than ever are aware of the major health issues, few can put those concepts into every day practice. Consumers are now learning how to read product labels. However, label information and percentage calculations can be confusing for all consumers, especially limited resource people. Consumers need help in order to understand, interpret, and apply the label information to eating and preparing food for good health. Consumers need help in using My Plate to incorporate balance, moderation and variety in their diets. It is through the use of My Plate that chronic diseases such as heart disease, hypertension, stroke, cancer, diabetes and obesity can be addressed in a tangible way through Extension programs and classes on healthy food selection and lifestyle management.

Financial woes continue to plague Guilford County's limited-resource families with 15.7 percent of the population living below the poverty level. The Median Household income is $46,896. The Top employer is Guilford County Schools followed by Moses Cone. In addition, 5.6 percent of the county's population is currently unemployed, slightly above the state's unemployment of 4.1%. Cooperative Extension can assist these individuals with financial management information and job hunting skills. Cooperative Extension offers financial literacy to help strengthen families. Audiences include limited resource individuals, single mothers, and displaced individuals residing in transitional housing.

Guilford County Schools’ Strategic Plan calls for an implementation of inquiry-based science instruction and recognizes the importance of STEM. Although today’s youth are immersed in technology, they are less engaged in STEM subjects (science, technology, engineering and math) All young people experience learning losses when they do not engage in educational activities during the summer. By the end of the 4th grade, African-American, Hispanic and low-income students are already two years behind grade level. By the time they reach the 12th grade they are four years behind. This achievement gap leads to early drop-out rates and lower college attendance which ultimately leads to a lower income as an adult and presents the opportunity for the cycle to repeat itself. In high school, these students are required to volunteer 250 service learning hours before they will receive their high school diploma.

In January 2016 at its annual retreat, a majority of the Board of Commissioners ranked the county priorities as: High Quality K-12 Education, Health People, Economic Development, Public Safety and Recreation and Culture. These priority issues will be addressed by Cooperative Extension through our objectives this year.

II. Objectives to Address the Cooperative Extension Long Range Plan

North Carolina's plant production systems will become more profitable and sustainable.
North Carolina's agricultural crops industry makes major contributions to local communities and the state’s economy. In 2014, the estimated farm gate value of crops was $4.72 billion, placing NC as the 17th largest in the nation. North Carolina is one of the most diversified agriculture states in the nation. The state's 50,200 farmers grow over 80 different commodities, utilizing 8.4 million of the state's 31 million acres to furnish consumers a dependable and affordable supply of food and fiber. Tobacco remains one of the state's most predominant farm commodities. North Carolina produces more tobacco and sweet potatoes than any other state and ranks second in Christmas tree cash receipts. The state also produces a significant amount of cucumbers for pickles, lima beans, turnip greens, collard greens, mustard greens, strawberries, bell peppers, blueberries, chili peppers, fresh market cucumbers, snap beans, cabbage, eggplant, watermelons, pecans, peaches, squash, apples, sweet corn, tomatoes, and grapes. There is continual technological change and the relative profitability of individual farm enterprises changes over time; therefore, farmers must respond by modifying their farming operations. Changes in consumer demand create new opportunities for producers. Growth in alternative forms of agriculture will include, among others, organic and niche market production. Educational and training programs for producers of plant agricultural products and services will enhance their ability to achieve financial and lifestyle goals and to enhance economic development locally, regionally and statewide.
North Carolina's animal production systems will become more profitable and sustainable.
North Carolina's livestock industry makes major contributions to local communities and the state’s economy. In 2014, the estimated farm gate value of livestock, dairy, and poultry was $8.85 billion, placing NC as the 7th largest in the nation. Hogs & pigs have historically been an important part of North Carolina agriculture. The industry has changed dramatically since the 1980s from the small farm raising a few hogs to large confinement type operations. North Carolina's number of cattle & calves on farms has remained relatively stable throughout time. Milk cow inventory and milk production have continued to decline in the state. Unlike other commodities, broiler production in North Carolina is increasing throughout the state. There is continual technological change and the relative profitability of individual farm enterprises changes over time; therefore, farmers must respond by modifying their farming operations. Changes in consumer demand create new opportunities for producers. Growth in alternative forms of agriculture will include, among others, organic, niche market production, and pasture-raised livestock. Educational and training programs for producers of animal agricultural products and services will enhance their ability to achieve financial and lifestyle goals and to enhance economic development locally, regionally and statewide.
Producers will increase sales of food locally to more agriculturally aware consumers through market development, producer and consumer education, and new farmer and infrastructure support.
Farmers will increase their capacity to supply product for local food sales through market planning efforts, producer and consumer education, beginning farmer training programs and local market infrastructure development. The fastest growing area of consumer demand in agriculture continues to be organic. Farmers' markets continue to expand as do multiple efforts in local sustainable agriculture. Nationally, "Buy Local, Buy Fresh" movements have emerged in the face of concerns about the risks involved in long distance transportation of industrialized food production. Increasingly, public officials and business leaders see promotion of local farm products as good public policy and local economic development. Additionally, individuals will learn to supplement their current diet by growing their own fruits and vegetables as individuals or as community groups.
Adults and youth will apply financial management practices to increase their economic security, which include to: meet basic necessities, increase savings, reduce debt, and build long-term assets.
North Carolina families are experiencing financial distress. A slowing state economy with depressed incomes, rising interest rates, housing and medical costs and increased living expenses for gasoline and food have strained household budgets. NC households (21%) lack access to enough food for an active healthy life for all household members. Families forced into home insecurity in the state reached 47% because of the inability to pay their rent or increased mortgage payments. Foreclosure starts increased 154% between the third quarter of 2006 and first quarter 2010 with projections of increases in foreclosures through 2012. The loss of housing as a primary asset hurts the family emotionally, psychologically and economically and impacts property values and tax revenue in communities. To avoid negative financial outcomes families need skills to develop and execute spending plans to better manage income to cover monthly living expenses, to evaluate, select and manage financial products, and to increase and protect family assets. Eighteen percent (18%) or 1 out of 5 households are asset poor and lack sufficient net worth to subsist at the poverty level for three months without a job or source of support. Due to inadequate savings 1 out of 3 households reported using credit cards to cover basic living expenses, including rent, mortgage payments, groceries, utilities and insurance. Credit card debt and changes in interest rate policies have forced many families to become delinquent on credit repayment. Families nationwide also report feeling that they have inadequate savings for emergencies, educating their children and retirement. Skills that help families develop and implement debt repayment strategies, make sound consumer decisions to avoid scams and frauds, like predatory lending and identity theft, and create and implement plans to achieve short-term and long-term financial goals like acquiring a home, saving for retirement and education and emergency funds can help families recover from poor financial management practices and become more financially secure. In the context of “the Great Recession” and high unemployment (10.4% North Carolina; 9% National (October 2011)) families need knowledge and skills to access information and programs that support family economic security during periods of unemployment, under-employment and/or retirement.
Futures that Work: School to Career Pathways
We are living in a new economy powered by technology, fueled by information and driven by knowledge. Extension programs provide opportunities for youth and adults to improve their level of education and increase their skills that enable them to be competitive in our global society and workforce.
Consumers and communities will enhance the value of plants, animals, and landscapes while conserving valuable natural resources and protecting the environment.
Residential, commercial and public entities will make decisions regarding plant selection, placement and management that will decrease water consumption, preserve and improve water quality, mitigate storm water contaminants, reduce erosion, energy consumption, and greenwaste, expand wildlife habitat, improve real estate value, and improve diet and nutrition of consumers. The horse and "farmer lifestyle" industry will continue to grow and have an increasing impact on North Carolina's economy, while protecting the environment. The NCDA&CS reports that 65,000 horse producers own over 225,000 horses which annually generates over $704 million of gross revenue from training, showing, boarding and breeding establishments in addition to agri-business sales of horse-related products. The total economic impact of the NC green industry is $8.6 billion, involving 151,982 employees, and 120,741 acres of production (Green Industry Council, 2006). North Carolina residential consumers spend $5.9 billion dollars per year on garden and landscape related expenses (Green Industry Council, 2006). For 2007, North Carolina's population is estimated to be 8,968,800 (LINC). The population grew by 1,323,288 (15%), between 1997 and 2007 and it is projected to grow by another 1,330,055 (13%), over the next ten years (LINC). Over 50% of the population now lives in urban areas. Despite evidence of the ecological and financial benefits, environmentally responsible landscaping strategies are not being implemented widely. Renovating a landscape to incorporate water conserving strategies may result in using 36% less water. Urban water run-off accounts for the majority of water pollution, mostly pesticides and fertilizers, that does not come from a specific industrial source. Selection of well-adapted plants, effective pest management, and appropriate care and feeding of plants will greatly reduce dependence on fertilizers and pesticides. Rain water that is not absorbed by the soil becomes erosive storm water runoff, which transports pollutants such as fertilizer, pesticides, sediment, motor oil, litter, and animal waste to local streams and rivers. Landscape designs will include rain gardens and other runoff catchment facilities (underground cisterns, etc.) that are attractive and easy to maintain in residential areas. Homeowners will learn that proper plant selection and placement can reduce winter heating bills by as much as 15% and summer cooling bills by as much as 50 percent, while reducing the need to prune over-sized plants. Wild habitat areas are rapidly being converted into housing and commercial properties, displacing native plants and animals. Choosing native or adapted plants that provide food and shelter creates a haven for butterflies, birds, lizards, and other animals. Edible landscaping can increase the amount and expand the variety of fresh fruits and vegetables consumed.
Youth and adult program participants will make healthy food choices, achieve the recommended amount of physical activity and reduce risk factors for chronic diseases.
Many North Carolinians are affected by chronic disease and conditions that compromise their quality of life and well-being. Heart disease, stroke and cancer continue to be leading causes of death in our state. In addition, obesity and obesity related chronic diseases such as diabetes continue to rise at alarming rates. Healthy eating and physical activity are critical to achieve optimal health. Many North Carolinians have diets that are too high in calories and too low in fruits, vegetables and whole grains. Portion sizes, foods eaten away-from-home and consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages continue to rise. In addition, most North Carolinians do not engage in regular physical activity. The prevalence of overweight and obesity has nearly doubled in the past 10 years. If the trend of overweight is not slowed, it will eliminate the progress we have made in reducing the burden of weigh-related chronic disease. One in every three US children born after 2000 will become diabetic unless many more people start eating less and exercising more. The cost of obesity in North Carolina in health care costs alone is over 2 billion dollars. There are many proposed reasons for the obesity epidemic, however unhealthy eating and physical inactivity are widely recognizes as primary contributors to the problem. Those who make healthy food choices and are physically active are more likely to achieve and maintain a healthy weight as well reduce chronic diseases. Ultimately, this will lead to reduction in health care costs, increased longevity, greater productivity and improved quality of life.

III. Relationship to County Government Objectives

Guilford County Government is a high performing local government organization that maintains a culture which embraces diversity, strives for equality, inspires individual and organizational excellence in an effective, fiscally sound and sustainable manner, and promotes quality development while protecting the character of communities and citizen engagement in supporting community health, citizen welfare and prosperity, public safety and educational opportunities in a business friendly environment.

The Six strategic issues/objectives our County Commissioners have set for 2018 are:
Providing High Quality K-12 Education
Healthy People
Economic Development
Infrastructure - safe and adequate public facilities
Public Safety- safe and secure communities
Organizational Excellence - providing the highest possible level of service
Recreation and Culture- enhance the quality of life in the community by supporting leisure physical activities and cultural opportunities

Cooperative Extension contributes to every one of the strategic goals in some way. Because our primary mission is research-based education, we help create opportunities for all residents via our educational outreach efforts. We reach Guilford County citizens through informal education which results in personal enrichment, and certification in pesticide licenses and safe plate. We encourage cultural diversity and have an active diversity committee. Nutrition, health and well-being are one of our major initiatives as is School to Career. Extension provides research-based information in agriculture (which includes field crops, livestock, dairy, forestry) and commercial horticulture to Guilford County citizens to support economic growth that provides a high quality of life. Customer service is of utmost importance to our staff to provide Guilford County citizens with efficient and timely information.

IV. Diversity Plan

Guilford County continues to welcome and acknowledge the positive impact related to differences in age, culture, class, ethnicity, gender, physical and mental abilities, race, sexual orientation, political beliefs, marital or family status, spiritual practice, and all dimensions of human diversity.

The population of Guilford is very diverse with the following statistics: 57.4% White; 34.6% Black; 4.9% Asian; and 7.9% Hispanic. The Hispanic population is the fastest growing segment of the county's population. The majority of our registration forms for programs include a space for any special needs of participants. We have in the past provided a Spanish translator as well as an interpreter for the hearing impaired as requested. We submitted five marketing brochures to Extension to have them translated into Spanish. Consulting with a new group called the Immigrant Advisory Board to see if there are ways Extension can become more engaged. Numerous publications are available on-line from other universities as needed. Our Legacy Demonstration Garden has a site for the physically limited to learn how to garden. A booklet has been prepared for assisted facilities to use this garden.

One way in which the Cooperative Extension office in Guilford County ensures that all reasonable efforts are made is to reach new, under-served, culturally diverse and any other audiences is via mass media. Over a year, we reach 25 million viewers and listeners through our television spots on WFMY-TV and WGHP-TV, and radio programs through Clear Channel stations. Although this viewership carries into other counties, we are helping to impact a vast population. The majority of individuals in the county own a television so we provide them with educational information in this way.

We are also directly with a number of organizations that provide assistance to the limited resource community of Guilford County.

Facebook and YouTube provide new avenues to connect with citizens. The Extension Facebook page is updated to keep people current with events and educational material. YouTube provides a means to increase viewership of the "Answer People" shows by splitting segments which could be targeted at specific needs.

For the past three years, programs have been offered through the public library system at four different branches. Our web site provides us with another avenue of reaching citizens since many individuals use a computer on a daily basis.

V. Primary Delivery and Evaluation Methods

Guilford County continues to welcome and acknowledge the positive impact related to differences in age, culture, class, ethnicity, gender, physical and mental abilities, race, sexual orientation, political beliefs, marital or family status, spiritual practice, and all dimensions of human diversity.

The population of Guilford is very diverse with the following statistics: 57.9% White; 34.2% Black; 4.8% Asian; and 7.8% Hispanic. The Hispanic population is the fastest growing segment of the county's population. The majority of our registration forms for programs include a space for any special needs of participants. There are 115 different dialects spoken in the Guilford County school system. We have in the past provided a Spanish translator as well as an interpreter for the hearing impaired as requested. Master Gardeners have translated several vegetable gardening publications into Spanish and other publications are available on-line from other universities. Our Legacy Demonstration Garden is ADA equipped. A booklet has been prepared for assisted living facilities to use this garden.
One way in which the Cooperative Extension office in Guilford County ensures that all reasonable efforts are made to reach new, underserved, culturally diverse and any other audiences is via mass media. Over a year, we reach 25 million viewers and listeners through our television spots on WFMY-TV, WGHP-TV, PBS's Almanac Gardener, and and radio programs through Clear Channel stations. Although this viewership carries into other counties, we are helping to impact a vast population. The majority of individuals in the county own a television so we provide them with educational information in this way.

Facebook and YouTube provide new avenues to connect with citizens. The Extension Facebook page is updated to keep people current with events and educational material. We hope to use YouTube as a means to increase viewership which could be targeted at specific needs.
For the past three years, programs have been offered through the public library system at four different branches. Our web site provides us with another avenue of reaching citizens since many individuals use a computer on a daily basis.

VI. Membership of Advisory Leadership System

Guilford County Advisory Council
Odile Huchette
Alison Manka
Steve Hayes
Heidi Majors
Rhonda Ingram
Marian King
Melaine Buckingham
Elaine Fryar
Carl Vierling
Chris Wilson
Micahel Washington
Dr Malcomb Schug
Faith Freeman
Carolyn Velez
Gerard Tuesdale
Lindley Ivey
Dennis Elliot
Jim Killacky
Doug Thorne
Steve hayes
Lindsay Whitley
Phil Flieschman
Extension Master Gardener Advisory Committee
Hanna P. Smith
Janice Newsom
Crystal Mercer
Christina Larson
Barb Purdie
Rose Foster
Ginny Sandberg
Julia Davis
Laura Tew
Linda M. Anderson
Deborah Pelli
Carol James
Janet Sommers
Debbie Frisbee
Jeanne Aller
Kay Quinliavan
Karen Williams
Dottie Brogdon
4-H Advisory Council
Jaymie Meyer
Brett Higgins
Grace Thompsom
Chrystal Black
Manju Schwandt
Star King
Jennifer Wilson
Andrew Cline
Valentina Curtis
4-H Volunteer Leaders Advisory Committee
Lisa Dillon
Sue Archer
Ivey Harris
Felicia Jones
Tanya Gold
Karen Wallace
Ernestine Alston
Alfreda Poteat
Betty Ingold
Emily Clapp
Rhonda Imgram
Farrah Beeson
Kay Coltrane
Janet McNeal
Jennifer El Najjar
Jeff Woodward
Patti Hoyt
Leah Dunlap
JessicalBlack
Shawnee Robinson
Family & Consumer Education Committee
Brenda Ross,
N'Gai Dickerson
Milagros Amaro
Janet Mayer
Joyce Younger
Britt Huggins
Andrea Wright
Horse Specialized Committee
Steva Allgood
Randy Boles
Sara Jo Durham
BJ Rierson
Georgianne Simms
Jerry Tyson
Beef Cattle Sp Committee
Harvey (RED) Dunlap
Ann Dunlap
Kelly Fields
Glen Hardin
Bruce Humble
Richard Jenkins
Shannon Oliver
Don K. Winfree
Sidney Wray
Guilford County Farmers
Gerald Frayar
Trey Early
Erin Early
Tommy Black
Vic Coffee
Edward Lewis
Jamey Walker
FoodCorps
Liz Driscoll
Tes Thraves
Caroline Stover
Cynthia Neilsen
Haily Moses
Keren Ferris
Susan Andreatta
Eliza Hudson
Janet Mayer

VII. Staff Membership

Karen Neill
Title: County Extension Director & Extension Agent, Agriculture - Urban Horticulture
Phone: (336) 641-2400
Email: karen_neill@ncsu.edu

Shameca Battle
Title: Extension Agent, Family and Consumer Sciences
Phone: (336) 641-2415
Email: shameca_battle@ncsu.edu

Lisa Benavente
Title: Regional Nutrition Extension Associate - Urban Programming, EFNEP & SNAP-Ed
Phone: (919) 515-3888
Email: lisa_benavente@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provides programmatic supervision to the EFNEP program in Wake, Durham, and Orange Counties. Responsible for training new EFNEP educators and volunteer development.

Daniel Campeau
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Poultry
Phone: (919) 542-8202
Email: dan_campeau@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Work mainly with Commercial Poultry industry. I also work with small scale poultry production. Service area is now the North Central District from Guilford to Halifax with the southern edge being Chatham and Wake county respectively.

Ben Chase
Title: Area Agent, Agriculture - Livestock
Phone: (336) 342-8235
Email: ben_chase@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Area Livestock Extension Agent - Rockingham & Guilford Counties

Marti Day
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Dairy
Phone: (919) 542-8202
Email: marti_day@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Responsible for educational programs for dairy farmers, youth with an interest in dairy projects and the general public with an interest in dairy foods and the dairy industry.

Erin Eure
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Commercial Fruits & Vegetables
Phone: (252) 357-1400
Email: erin_eure@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provides educational opportunities and technical support to commercial fruit and vegetable growers, agents, and industry in northeastern NC.

Deb Fuller
Title: County Extension Administrative Assistant
Phone: (336) 641-2433
Email: debra_fuller@ncsu.edu

Marissa Herchler
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Animal Food Safety (FSMA Programs)
Phone: (919) 515-5396
Email: marissa_herchler@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Marissa is an Area Specialized Agent for animal food safety, with emphasis on the new Food Safety Modernization Act rules, as they apply to feed mills in North Carolina. Please contact Marissa with any FSMA related questions, or PCQI training inquiries.

Jordan Jefferies-James
Title: Program Assistant, Family and Consumer Sciences - EFNEP
Phone: (336) 641-2400
Email: jjeffer3@ncsu.edu

Stacey Jones
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Commercial Nursery and Greenhouse
Phone: (704) 920-3310
Email: stacey_jones@ncsu.edu

Peggie Lewis Joyce
Title: Extension Agent, 4-H Youth Development
Phone: (336) 641-2400
Email: peggie_lewis@ncsu.edu

Bill Lord
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Water Resources
Phone: (919) 496-3344
Email: william_lord@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Water quality education and technical assistance

Rachel McDowell
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Consumer & Retail Food Safety
Phone: (919) 515-9155
Email: romcdowe@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Support FCS Agents in delivering timely and evidence-based food safety education and information to stakeholders in NC.

Crystal Mercer
Title: Extension Master Gardener Volunteer Coordinator
Phone: (336) 641-2414
Email: crystal_mercer@ncsu.edu

Currey Nobles
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Food Safety
Phone: (919) 515-9520
Email: canobles@ncsu.edu

Sadie Payne
Title: Extension Agent, 4-H Youth Development
Phone: (336) 641-2400
Email: sadie_payne@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: I work specifically with non traditional audiences in the urban Guilford County setting. Youth ages 5-18 are invited to participate in hands-on, experiential learning in the areas of S.T.E.M., Healthy Living and Citizenship with 4-H!

Elena Rogers
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Food Safety - Fresh Produce Western NC
Phone: (828) 352-2519
Email: elena_rogers@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provide educational programs, training and technical support focusing on fresh produce safety to Agents and growers in Western NC.

Mignon Sheppard
Title: County Extension Support Specialist
Phone: (336) 641-2421
Email: mignon_sheppard@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provide administrative support to the Family and Consumer Sciences staff.

Hanna Smith
Title: Extension Agent, Agriculture - Horticulture
Phone: (336) 641-2407
Email: hanna_smith@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Responsible for the Extension Master Gardener Volunteer program and consumer and commercial horticulture.

Barbara Strong
Title: Family Education Program Associate
Phone: (336) 641-2430
Email: barbara_strong@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Family Education Program Associate for Parenting, Energy Conservation, Home Care and Maintenance Programs, Mold & Mildew Calls, and Household Pest Calls

Lauren Taubert
Title: County Extension Support Specialist
Phone: (336) 641-2400
Email: lauren_taubert@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Support for 4-H and Urban Horticulture.

Justina Vaughan
Title: 4-H Program Assistant, 4-H Youth Development
Phone: (336) 641-2400
Email: justina_vaughan@ncsu.edu

Vince Webb
Title: Extension Agent, Family and Consumer Sciences
Phone: (336) 641-2400
Email: vince_webb@ncsu.edu

Anna-Beth Williams
Title: Extension Agent, Agriculture
Phone: (336) 641-2400
Email: anna-beth_williams@ncsu.edu

Mitch Woodward
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Watersheds and Water Quality
Phone: (919) 250-1112
Email: mdwoodwa@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: NC Cooperative Extension's Goals include: - NC's natural resources and environmental quality will be protected, conserved and enhanced. - NC will have profitable, environmentally sustainable plant, animal and food systems. Protecting our environmental resources, particularly drinking water quality, is a top priority in NC. NC Cooperative Extension is a leader in teaching, researching, and accelerating the adoption of effective water quality protection practices.

VIII. Contact Information

Guilford County Center
3309 Burlington Rd
Greensboro, NC 27405

Phone: (336) 641-2400
Fax: (336) 641-2402
URL: http://guilford.ces.ncsu.edu