2019 Guilford County Program Impact Report

Approved: January 17, 2020

I. Executive Summary

The N.C. Cooperative Extension Team was proud to serve the citizens of Guilford County in 2019 by addressing issues and needs as identified by advisory groups, existing clients and community partners.

In 2019, Extension Agents reported 24,126 face to face contacts which included 1,462 hours of workshops, seminars, and hands-on demonstrations with 10,833 registered participants. Extension responded to 78,374 citizens through telephone, Facebook, email and other non-face-to-face methods and provided research-based education to an estimated 2 million citizens with monthly radio and TV programs.

637 volunteers worked with Agents to extend the outreach efforts of Cooperative Extension programming by contributing 17,169 volunteer hours. These hours are conservatively valued at $25.43 an hour and totaled $436,607. In addition to this number, $39,665 were collected through donations, grants, and user fees to expand programming and opportunities for Guilford County citizens.

Below are some program highlights:

3,230 youth were involved in at least 6 hours of 4-H activities this year. 247 youth were registered members of a 4-H club and attended regular meetings. 243 youth were registered as "at large" members and participated in special educational programs offered by Extension Agents throughout the year. A grant of $11,760 was received to help 40 youth attend overnight camp at Betsy Jeff Penn 4-H Camp and 60 youth participated in the 4-H day camp program during the summer. Youth activities both inside and outside of schools contribute significantly to school achievement and overall development through the programs that we offer. 3,058 unduplicated youth participated in school enrichment activities offered by Extension. 13 youth strengthened their research and reasoning skills by participating in County, District, and/or State level presentation competitions bringing home gold, silver, and bronze State Medals. 4-H teens also had the opportunity to participate in many activities inside and outside the county including, NC 4-H Congress, NC Youth Summit, NC Citizenship Focus, Teen Retreat, and National 4-H Congress.

Extension Agents impact agricultural initiatives through their support of row crop farmers, livestock producers, local farmer's markets, community gardens and both commercial and home horticulture producers throughout the county. In 2019, 4,677 participants reported use of Extension-recommended best management practices in landscapes, turf, gardens, and pest and soil management. In addition, row crop and animal production related programs resulted in 2,039 individual client contacts. Our Agents also worked with 2,168 individuals growing food in community or home gardens. Timely and relevant education by our Agricultural Agents has included on-farm demonstrations, community and school garden programs, pruning demonstrations, information on fruit and vegetable production, value-added product information, alternative enterprises, farm tours, and special outreach events.

Family and Consumer Sciences Agents assisted county residents through programs related to nutrition, wellness, food safety and financial management. Programs assisted residents with making healthy diet choices, increasing physical activity, working toward chronic disease risk reduction strategies, and making sound financial decisions. In 2019, 2,053 individuals increased their knowledge of healthy eating and physical activity. 288 food handlers and restaurant managers increased their knowledge and skills in safe food handling practices through the Safe Plates program. 191 participants increased their knowledge in safe home food handling, preservation, or preparation practices through cooking and canning classes. In addition, 2,225 individuals increased their understanding related to family financial management skills.

II. County Background

As part of the eleven-county Piedmont Triad region, Guilford County is centered along the Piedmont industrial crescent stretching from Raleigh to Charlotte. With a population estimated at 517,600 Guilford County is ranked third in the state. Major cities include Greensboro (287,027) and High Point (111,223). Over 117,820 school age youth reside in Guilford County communities. 4-H partners with young people, families, schools and communities to create dynamic youth development programs and support structures for all young people. Guilford County Schools’ Strategic Plan calls for an implementation of inquiry-based science instruction and recognizes the importance of STEM, and 4-H is instrumental in leading these efforts in communities around across the County.

Agriculture continues to be an integral part of Guilford County, blending urban and rural. Of our 413,565 acres in the county, about 90,750 acres are farmland. The 2017 NCDA&CS Agricultural Income for Guilford County is $55.7 million. Top commodities include: hay, grain crops, nursery and greenhouse operations, livestock and horses, but interest in local foods is bringing on a shift in what is being grown on many farms. There are still 14,100 acres of hay that is harvested yearly, ranking us 16th in the state for hay production. Guilford County also ranks 2nd in the state for horses with an equine inventory of 10,940 and value of $66,504,000. There are 14,000 head of cattle which we rank 18th and 1,500 head of milk cows where we rank 4th not to mention 8,000 hogs and 355,000 layers. The nursery and greenhouse industry is also still a viable industry with over 10 wholesale nurseries and greenhouses in the county. Issues involving residential and consumer horticulture such as pest management and home food production continue to intensify each year. Cooperative Extension is the only agency designed to provide pesticide applicators training.

Public interest and concern about nutrition and health issues are at an all-time high. A survey conducted by Gallup for the Food Research and Action Center ranked Greensboro/High Point in the top 10 cities in the nation for the amount of people who say they don't have enough money for food - Food Insecurity. There are 25 food deserts that have been identified in Guilford County. Community/School gardens and Food Corps programs are addressing this concern. While more consumers than ever are aware of the major health issues, few can put those concepts into every day practice. Heart disease, hypertension, stroke, cancer, diabetes and obesity can be addressed in a tangible way through Extension programs and classes on healthy food selection and lifestyle management.

Financial woes continue to plague Guilford County's limited-resource families with 15.7 percent of the population living below the poverty level. The Median Household income is $46,896. The Top employer is Guilford County Schools followed by Moses Cone. In addition, 5.6 percent of the county's population is currently unemployed, slightly above the state's unemployment of 4.1%. Cooperative Extension can assist these individuals with financial management information and job-hunting skills. Cooperative Extension offers financial literacy to help strengthen families. Audiences include limited resource individuals, single mothers, and displaced individuals residing in transitional housing.

The Board of Commissioners ranked the county priorities as: High Quality K-12 Education, Health People, Economic Development, Public Safety and Recreation and Culture. These priority issues will be addressed by Cooperative Extension through our objectives this year.

III. Objectives to Address the Cooperative Extension Long Range Plan

Our natural resource and environmental programs conserve our precious natural resources and maintain a clean and healthy environment.

Value* Outcome Description
14Number of child and youth educators aspiring to implement quality outdoor learning environments for children
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Our family and consumer sciences programs improve the well-being of individuals, families, and communities.

Value* Outcome Description
18Number of adults increasing knowledge of life skills (such as goal setting, stress management, self-care and healthy relationships)
18Number of adults increasing their knowledge of community resources
18Number of adults and professionals increasing their knowledge of human development over the life course and emerging best practices in parenting and caregiving
18Number of parents and other caregivers of children increasing their knowledge of positive parenting practices (such as communication and discipline)
2225Number of people gaining basic financial management knowledge and/or skills (such as; budgeting, record keeping, goal setting, writing goals, consumer decision-making)
2225Number of people gaining knowledge and/or skills in managing financial products and financial identity (such as; credit, debt management, identify theft, credit reports and scores, scams, banking skills)
2325Number of people gaining knowledge and/or skills to increase family assets (such as; home ownership, Individual Development Accounts (IDAs), estate planning (including Grandma’s Yellow Pie Plate), savings and investments, retirement planning)
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
2225Number of adults using effective life skills (such as goal setting, stress management, self-care and healthy relationships)
2225Number of professionals using learned best practices with children/youth/adults/older adults
2225Number of people implementing basic financial management strategies (such as; developing a budget, keeping records, etc.)
2225Number of people accessing financial products and programs recognized as vehicles for wealth accumulation
2225Number of people accessing programs and implementing strategies to support family economic well-being
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Our plant production programs improve production, profitability, and sustainability of the agriculture sector.

Value* Outcome Description
6Number of producers who gain skills or knowledge to increase production for local markets.
8Number of producers who improve local food marketing skills or knowledge.
482Number of pesticide applicators receiving continuing education credits
26Number of pesticide credit hours provided
338Number of crop (all plant systems) producers increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, and/or skills as related to: 1. Best management production practices (cultural, nutrient, and genetics) 2. Pest/insect, disease, weed, wildlife management 3. Financial/Farm management tools and practices (business, marketing, government policy, human resources) 4. Alternative agriculture, bioenergy, and value-added enterprises
1Number of Extension initiated and controlled county demonstration test sites
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
2Number of producers who diversified their marketing strategies into local markets (direct, intermediated/food service, institutional).
2Number of producers (and other members of the local food supply chain) who have increased revenue
1Number of new farms (beginning farmers) selling into local markets for local consumption (in this reporting period)
302Number of crop (all plant systems) producers adopting best management practices, including those practices related to nutrient management, conservation, production, cultivars, pest management (weeds, diseases, insects), business management, and marketing
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Our animal production programs improve production, profitability, and sustainability of the agriculture sector.

Value* Outcome Description
74Number of producers who improve local food marketing skills or knowledge.
74Number of producers who gain skills or knowledge to increase production for local markets.
74Number of animal producers who increased knowledge of farm business management, business planning, financial management, marketing, or estate planning.
74Number of animal producers who learned how to develop a management plan (i.e. grazing plan, feeding plan, drought plan, business plan, disaster plan, etc.)
100Number of producers who increased knowledge of pasture/forage management practices (field improvement, herbicide management, grazing season extension, weed control, forage quality, haylage production, nitrate testing, etc.)
105Number of producers who increased knowledge of nutrition, ration balancing, mineral supplements, breeding, and reproduction
74Number of producers who increased knowledge of the strategies to promote animal health and welfare and reduce the potential for infectious diseases through proper use of vaccines, biosecurity, detection and identification of common diseases, appropriate use of animal medications, and mitigation of antimicrobial resistance transmission
2Number of producers who increased knowledge of animal waste management practices
75Number of producers who increased knowledge of how to prepare, mitigate, and recover from natural disasters impacting animal agriculture
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
6Number of producers who diversified their marketing strategies into local markets (direct, intermediated/food service, institutional).
74Number of new farms (beginning farmers) selling into local markets for local consumption (in this reporting period)
5Number of producers (and other members of the local food supply chain) who have increased revenue
74Number of participants that have adopted farm safety practices
74Number of farmers, employees or family members adopting regular use of appropriate PPE following AgriSafe or Certified Safe Farm participation
74Number of producers adopting extension-recommended practices related to planning, marketing, and financial management
2Number of producers implementing Extension-recommended best management practices for animal waste management
55Number of acres where Extension-recommended nutrient applications were used
94Number of producers who adopted Extension-recommended best management practices and production changes related to quality assurance (vaccinations, castration, culling techniques, etc.)
90Number of producers who adopted Extension-recommended best management practices and production changes related to genetic improvement (AI, heifer/bull selection)
101Number of producers who adopted Extension-recommended best management practices and production changes related to nutrition (mineral, feed rations)
105Number of producers who adopted Extension-recommended best management practices and production changes related to internal parasite management (fecals, deworming)
86Number of producers who adopted Extension-recommended best management practices related to pasture management
96Number of producers who adopted Extension-recommended best management practices and production changes related to nutrition, ration balancing, mineral supplement, breeding, and reproduction
20Number of producers using improved biosecurity practices
1Number of waste utilization/waste management plans developed or updated
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Our community development programs build strong and thriving communities.

Our 4-H youth development programs grow the skills young people need to succeed in life and career.

Value* Outcome Description
77Number of teachers trained in 4-H STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) curriculum
3553Number of youth (students) increasing knowledge in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math)
1663Total number of female participants in STEM program
50Number of youth (students) participating in 4-H dropout prevention (student at-risk) programs
125Number of high school age youth (students) participating as members of 4-H clubs
843Number of youth increasing knowledge of life skills
2016Number of children/youth who improved knowledge of local food and agricultural systems.
1382Number of youth increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
43Number of youth demonstrating increased knowledge of natural resources and environmental issues
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
70Number of teachers using 4-H STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) curriculum in their classrooms
669Number of youth (students) gaining career / employability skills
790Number of youth (students) gaining entrepreneurship skills
1062Number of youth using effective life skills
25Number of youth willing to participate in conservation actions
504Number of youth increasing their physical activity
11Number of youth volunteers serving in new or expanded roles within Extension
2Number of youth volunteers serving in new or expanded roles beyond Extension, including community boards and task forces
1160Number of youth increasing their fruit and vegetable consumption
1402Number of youth who grow food in school gardens.
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Our consumer horticulture programs teach families and communities about environmentally friendly methods for gardening and controlling pests.

Value* Outcome Description
1533Number of individuals who gain knowledge or acquire skills related to vegetable/fruit gardening
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
765Number of individuals who grow food in community gardens.
712Number of individuals who begin home food production by starting a vegetable and/or fruit garden
4677Number of participants who use extension-recommended best management practices in landscapes, turf, and gardens, including pest (insect, weed, disease, wildlife) and soil management
1169Number of participants selecting appropriate landscape plants (adapted, drought tolerant, appropriate size, etc.)
1403Number of participants growing food for home consumption
479Number of participants adopting composting
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Our food safety and nutrition programs create a safer and more sustainable food supply and improve the health and nutrition of individuals, families, and our communities.

Value* Outcome Description
191Number of participants who increase their knowledge of safe home food handling, preservation, or preparation practices
11Number of participants who increase their knowledge of Growing Safer Gardens
288Number of food handlers who increase their knowledge and skills in safe food handling practices
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
173Number of participants developing food safety plans
220Number of adults increasing their fruit and vegetables consumption
211Number of participants increasing their physical activity
7039Number of pounds of local food donated for consumption by vulnerable populations
189Number of participants who consume less sodium in their diet
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

IV. Number of Contacts Made by Extension

Type of ContactNumber
Face-to-face* 24,126
Non face-to-face** 1,872,955
Total by Extension staff in 2019 1,897,081
* Face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make directly with individuals through one-on-one visits, meetings, and other activities where staff members work directly with individuals.
** Non face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make indirectly with individuals by telephone, email, newsletters, news articles, radio, television, and other means.

V. Designated Grants Received by Extension

Type of GrantAmount
Contracts/Grants $11,760.00
Gifts/Donations $13,185.00
In-Kind Grants/Donations $5,618.95
United Way/Foundations $0.00
User Fees $9,101.34
Total $39,665.29

VI. Volunteer Involvement in Extension Programs

Number of Volunteers* Number of Volunteer Hours Known client contacts by volunteers Dollar Value at 25.43
4-H 230 1956 7749 $ 49,741.00
Advisory Leadership System 63 103 0 $ 2,619.00
EFNEP 89 222 1252 $ 5,645.00
Extension Master Gardener 152 9946 3624 $ 252,927.00
Extension Master Food Volunteers 4 13 92 $ 331.00
Other: Agriculture 89 4643 302 $ 118,071.00
Other: Food & Nutrition 10 286 179 $ 7,273.00
Total: 637 17169 13198 $ 436,608.00
* The number of volunteers reflects the overall number of volunteers for multiple events.

VII. Membership of Advisory Leadership System

Guilford County Advisory Council
Odile Huchette
Alison Manka
Steve Hayes
Heidi Majors
Rhonda Ingram
Marian King
Melaine Buckingham
Elaine Fryar
Carl Vierling
Chris Wilson
Micahel Washington
Dr Malcomb Schug
Faith Freeman
Carolyn Velez
Gerard Tuesdale
Lindley Ivey
Dennis Elliot
Jim Killacky
Doug Thorne
Steve hayes
Lindsay Whitley
Phil Flieschman
Extension Master Gardener Advisory Committee
Hanna P. Smith
Janice Newsom
Crystal Mercer
Christina Larson
Barb Purdie
Rose Foster
Ginny Sandberg
Julia Davis
Laura Tew
Linda M. Anderson
Deborah Pelli
Carol James
Janet Sommers
Debbie Frisbee
Jeanne Aller
Kay Quinliavan
Karen Williams
Dottie Brogdon
4-H Advisory Council
Jaymie Meyer
Brett Higgins
Grace Thompsom
Chrystal Black
Manju Schwandt
Star King
Jennifer Wilson
Andrew Cline
Valentina Curtis
4-H Volunteer Leaders Advisory Committee
Lisa Dillon
Sue Archer
Ivey Harris
Felicia Jones
Tanya Gold
Karen Wallace
Ernestine Alston
Alfreda Poteat
Betty Ingold
Emily Clapp
Rhonda Imgram
Farrah Beeson
Kay Coltrane
Janet McNeal
Jennifer El Najjar
Jeff Woodward
Patti Hoyt
Leah Dunlap
JessicalBlack
Shawnee Robinson
Horse Specialized Committee
Steva Allgood
Randy Boles
Sara Jo Durham
BJ Rierson
Georgianne Simms
Jerry Tyson
Beef Cattle Sp Committee
Thom Atkinson
Harvey (RED) Dunlap
Ann Dunlap
Kelly Fields
Glen Hardin
Bruce Humble
Richard Jenkins
Shannon Oliver
Don K. Winfree
Sidney Wray
Guilford County Farmers
Gerald Frayar
Trey Early
Erin Early
Tommy Black
Vic Coffee
Edward Lewis
Jamey Walker
FoodCorps
Liz Driscoll
Tes Thraves
Caroline Stover
Cynthia Neilsen
Haily Moses
Keren Ferris
Susan Andreatta
Eliza Hudson
Janet Mayer

VIII. Staff Membership

Molly Alexi
Title: County Extension Director
Phone: (336) 641-2417
Email: molly_alexi@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: County Extension Director; Community and Rural Development

Jonas Asbill
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Poultry
Phone: (336) 318-6000
Email: jonas_asbill@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Serving the poultry industry across 20 counties in the North Central and Northeast districts

Shameca Battle
Title: Extension Agent, Family and Consumer Sciences
Phone: (336) 641-2415
Email: ssbattle@ncat.edu
Brief Job Description: The Extension Agent for Family and Consumer Science is responsible for planning, implementing and evaluating effective and comprehensive educational programs and training designed to solve social and economic problems in family and consumer sciences confronting socially disadvantaged and limited resource families

Lisa Benavente
Title: Nutrition Extension Associate, EFNEP and SNAP-Ed
Phone: (919) 515-3888
Email: lisa_benavente@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provides leadership to statewide EFNEP staff and volunteer development. Communicates and guides EFNEP Regional Nutrition Extension Associates (RNEA) in coaching new PAs as they complete EFNEP's New Educator Skills Training (NEST). Supports RNEAs in training EFNEP PAs and/or FCS Agents on Policy, Systems, and Environmental initiatives.

Marti Day
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Dairy
Phone: (919) 542-8202
Email: marti_day@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Responsible for educational programs for dairy farmers, youth with an interest in dairy projects and the general public with an interest in dairy foods and the dairy industry.

Erin Eure
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Commercial Fruits and Vegetables
Phone: (252) 357-1400
Email: erin_eure@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provides educational opportunities and technical support to commercial fruit and vegetable growers, agents, and industry in northeastern NC.

Ben Grandon
Title: Extension Agent, Agriculture - Commercial Horticulture and Field Crops
Phone: (336) 641-2416
Email: ben_grandon@ncsu.edu

Marissa Herchler
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Animal Food Safety (FSMA Programs)
Phone: (919) 515-5396
Email: marissa_herchler@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Marissa is an Area Specialized Agent for animal food safety, with emphasis on the new Food Safety Modernization Act rules, as they apply to feed mills in North Carolina. Please contact Marissa with any FSMA related questions, or PCQI training inquiries.

Rachel Herring
Title: County Extension Administrative Assistant
Phone: (336) 641-2433
Email: rachel_herring@ncsu.edu

Stacey Jones
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Commercial Nursery and Greenhouse
Phone: (704) 920-3310
Email: stacey_jones@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: I work with commercial greenhouses and nurseries to help them with growing related issues. These issues range from pests (insect, disease, and weeds), substrates, nutrition, and other miscellaneous topics.

Peggie Lewis Joyce
Title: Area 4-H Agent - Central Region
Phone: (336) 242-2080
Email: peggie_lewis@ncsu.edu

Meredith Kreeger
Title: EFNEP Educator, Extension Program Assistant
Phone: (336) 641-2445
Email: mlkreeger@ncat.edu

Cole Maness
Title: Extension Agent, Agriculture - Livestock and Forage Crops
Phone: (336) 641-2400
Email: scmaness@ncsu.edu

Robin McNeill
Title: EFNEP Educator, Extension Program Assistant - Youth
Phone: (336) 641-2422
Email: rsmcneil@ncsu.edu

Crystal Mercer
Title: Extension Master Gardener Volunteer Coordinator & Visit NC Farm App Coordinator
Phone: (336) 641-2414
Email: crystal_mercer@ncsu.edu

Sarah Paschall
Title: Extension Agent, 4-H Youth Development
Phone: (336) 641-2423
Email: sehyder@ncsu.edu

Megan Reid
Title: County Extension Support Specialist
Phone: (336) 641-2421
Email: amreid@ncat.edu

Ashley Robbins
Title: Area Specialized Agent - Dairy
Phone: (919) 542-8203
Email: ashley_robbins@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Marti Day and I are the Area Specialized Dairy Agents - the county-based arm of the Cooperative Extension Dairy Team. We are out here in the counties to help you set and reach your farm, family and business goals. We have collaborative expertise in the areas of Waste Management, Udder Health, Cow Comfort, Nutrition and Forage Management with specialties in (Ashley)Reproduction, Records Management, Animal Health and (Marti)Alternative Markets, Organic Dairy, Grazing Management, and On-farm Processing. We hope to provide comprehensive educational programs for our farmers, consumers and youth for every county across the state. We are here for you by phone, email or text and look forward to working with you!

Elena Rogers
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Food Safety - Fresh Produce Western NC
Phone: (828) 352-2519
Email: elena_rogers@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provide educational programs, training and technical support focusing on fresh produce safety to Agents and growers in Western NC.

Hanna Smith
Title: Extension Agent, Agriculture - Horticulture
Phone: (336) 641-2407
Email: hanna_smith@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Responsible for the Extension Master Gardener volunteer program, consumer horticulture, and commercial nurseries, greenhouses, and landscape companies.

Lauren Taubert
Title: County Extension Support Specialist
Phone: (336) 641-2424
Email: lauren_taubert@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Support for 4-H and Urban Horticulture.

Raven Tuffin
Title: EFNEP Educator, Extension Program Assistant - Adult
Phone: (336) 641-2411
Email: rstuffin@ncsu.edu

Vince Webb
Title: Extension Agent, Family and Consumer Sciences
Phone: (336) 641-2400
Email: vince_webb@ncsu.edu

Quina Weber-Shirk
Title: Extension Agent, Agriculture - Community and School Gardens
Phone: (336) 641-2427
Email: jjwebers@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: My goal is to support a vibrant network of community and school gardens throughout Guilford County which contribute to a just and sustainable food system. I do this by coordinating educational programs for community and school gardeners including garden site visits, technical assistance with garden start-up, community organizing, garden-based curriculum and activities, and year-round sustainable gardening practices. As part of Cooperative Extension, I am here to be a resource to the residents of Guilford County -- let me know how I can best support your community gardening efforts! Focus areas: Community Gardens, School Gardens, Farm to School, Farm to Early Child Education (ECE), Local Foods Coordinator

Mitch Woodward
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Watersheds and Water Quality
Phone: (919) 414-3873
Email: mdwoodwa@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: NC Cooperative Extension's Goals include: - NC's natural resources and environmental quality will be protected, conserved and enhanced. - NC will have profitable, environmentally sustainable plant, animal and food systems. Protecting our environmental resources, particularly drinking water quality, is a top priority in NC. NC Cooperative Extension is a leader in teaching, researching, and accelerating the adoption of effective water quality protection practices.

IX. Contact Information

Guilford County Center
3309 Burlington Rd
Greensboro, NC 27405

Phone: (336) 641-2400
Fax: (336) 641-2402
URL: http://guilford.ces.ncsu.edu