2019 Harnett County Program Impact Report

Approved: January 10, 2020

I. Executive Summary

The staff of N.C. Cooperative Extension-Harnett County Center consists of 14 members including full-time agents, area specialized agents, administration, program assistants, associates, and grant-funded staff members. Programs addressing issues identified by the county advisory and specialized committees are led by agents within the areas of Foods and Nutrition, Agriculture, Family, and Consumer Sciences, 4-H Youth Development, and Community and Rural Development. The following is a brief narrative of Cooperative Extension program impacts addressing the needs of the citizens of Harnett County.

Community and Rural Development:

The Community and Rural Development program had 336 participants increase their knowledge of disaster preparedness planning, mitigation, and recovery through fairs and community gatherings. 32 of these individuals developed actual preparedness plans. Through partnerships with both land grant institutions over 96 community leaders and Extension agents acquired knowledge and skills to convene and lead inclusive groups. STEM and physical activity was a major initiative taught by teen health ambassadors, 61 youth increased knowledge of life skills, STEM careers, and the importance of physical activity. 76 limited resource participants increased their awareness, knowledge or skills in business-related topics (e.g., management, product development, marketing, business structure options, business law and/or liability) and 3 developed non-profit organizations.

4-H Youth Development:

4-H Youth Development programs during 2019 focused on a number of valuable competencies including 110 limited resource youth that increased knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership. Service to the community is another key component of leadership development. During the 2019 sweet potato harvest, 140 youth and adult volunteers worked together to glean over 31,000 pounds of sweet potatoes to meet the needs of needy people in the community. 4-H members and county youth also participated in public speaking presentations, 4-H State Congress, 4-H Citizenship Focus, Winter Enrichment, Teen Retreat, and many other leadership development opportunities. STEM programming was a major focus of Harnett County 4-H along with attention devoted toward helping give young people the skills they need for careers and employability. Through STEM programs like embryology and others, 1,961 youth increased their knowledge of science through 4-H initiatives with 138 gaining new career and employability skills. Not only did the students benefit from 4-H STEM curriculum, 101 teachers were trained in the effective use of this 4-H resource in their classroom.

Foods and Nutrition:

Harnett County Cooperative Extension offered the NC Safe Plates certified food safety managers course and the National Registry of Food Safety Professionals certified exam. Of the 22 participants tested, all passed. In addition, 100% of the participants that completed the post-survey said that the class met their needs and that they intended to implement the food safety principles learned during the course in their facilities. Harnett County Cooperative Extension also partnered with Harnett County Health Dept., Harnett County Library, Campbell University, and Harnett County Extension Community Association (ECA) to offer programs including Healthy Cooking on a Budget, Girls are Great: Kids in the Kitchen, Med Instead of Meds, ECA International Day, and Farm to Kitchen. Three hundred eighty-four (384) youth and adult participants were reached with these workshops and participants demonstrated increased culinary skills by preparing healthy meals at the end of the programs. Also, 90% of participants surveyed reported increase consumption of fruit and vegetables due to the program.

Agricultural Programs:

The Harnett County Agriculture program had an outstanding year with many positive financial impacts for local growers and livestock producers. Through best management practices, including those practices related to husbandry, improved planning, marketing, and financial practices along with using livestock organic by-products instead of synthetic fertilizers; Harnett livestock producers saw an estimated income gain of $322,461. Net income gains realized by the adoption of best management practices, including those practices related to nutrient management, conservation, production, cultivars, pest management (weeds, diseases, insects), business management, and marketing showed estimated income gains of nearly half a million dollars for local growers. In an effort to ensure safety for farm laborers and consumers, 1,756 hours of pesticide application credit hours were provided with 140 persons also certified in Good Agricultural Practices (GAPs) or Good Handling Practices (GHPs).s). Harnett County Agriculture Agents provided assistance to nine Harnett County farmers with help writing, reviewing and submitting grant applications. Five Harnett County farmers were awarded grants totaling $31, 050. Harnett County Agriculture agents were awarded grants totaling $50,595 from The North Carolina Tobacco Trust Fund Commission ($32, 500), NC State Ag Innovation Grant ($16,250), and NCDA Pesticide Container Recycling Program ($1,845).

Horticulture Programs:

Harnett County Horticulture has had a fantastic year. On-farm consultations have led to an increase in best management practices, integrated pest management, and diversified operations, with some growers producing a combination of livestock, row crops, and produce. Dozens of farmers diversified their operations by adding industrial hemp, allowing Harnett County to become one of the top two producers of industrial hemp in the state. Growers benefited from interest meetings, in-field training led by Extension Agents and NCDA Regional Agronomists, and training programs tailored to specific needs, such as produce marketing options.

Harnett County has also grown in two important ways: an increase in new homeowners living in the southeastern US for the first time and an increase in first-time property owners who are looking to homestead or farm. To meet the needs and provide information on their interests, trainings were held to orient first-time farmers to the ag industry and presentations were given across the county to highlight the challenges and benefits of landscaping in the southeast. To further meet the needs of homeowners, the Horticulture program welcomed 10 new Extension Master Gardener Volunteers (EMGVs) who are dedicated to serving Harnett County residents and educating the public on home gardening best practices. Over the course of 2019, nearly 40 EMGVs gave 2,536 hours valued at nearly $65,000.

II. County Background

Harnett County is located within an easy drive of Research Triangle Park (RTP) and all its amenities as well as Fort Bragg, home of the elite 82nd Airborne, FORSCOM, and USARC Headquarters. Transportation corridors include I-95, US 301, US 421 and US 401 providing easy access to regional and national markets and a short distance from connections with I-40. North Carolina routes 24, 27, 42, 55, 82, 87, 210 and 217 also provide direct links throughout Harnett County. The globally recognized Research Triangle Park and RDU International Airport are less than an hour away and Fayetteville's airport is half that. Harnett is home to Campbell University and the county's location offers easy access to the University of NC System campuses, North Carolina State University's Centennial Campus and many private universities within an hour's drive or less. Harnett borders seven counties: Sampson and Johnston Counties to the east; Wake County to the north; Chatham, Lee and Moore Counties to the west; and Cumberland County (Fort Bragg US Army Base) to the south. In 2010 the population for Harnett County was listed at 114,678 and is currently listed as a Tier 2 County.

Harnett County is composed of a blend of industry, a military presence, and a significant agricultural industry. Agriculture has taken a small decline with the closing of poultry plants; some farms are either changing their operation or selling to development. There are 727 farms with an average farm size of 154 acres representing total land acreage in farms at 111,770. Cash receipts from all agriculture for 2012 are estimated to be $196,983,305. Currently, over 85,000 acres of forest land is managed in Harnett County. The management of forestry accounted for $4.2 million in 2008. Urban horticulture, greenhouses, and nurseries represent another important aspect of the agricultural economy in the county and rank 39th in the state. Harnett County is unique in the region in that it has an extensive water supply network, serving 98% of the county as well as Cumberland, Lee, Wake, Johnston, and Moore.

Harnett County is projected to be the 3rd fastest growth county behind Wake and Johnston Counties to 2030, it is also one of the fastest growing counties in numbers of families with young children. The county’s median age is 32.5 while the state median age is 35.3. The population of children 0-5 has increased by 11.7% in the past 3 years while it has increased statewide by only 4.9%. The county has also seen a major increase in enrollment for school age children. These numbers are expected to grow as US Department of Defense Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) continues to move soldiers and their families to Fort Bragg. The county continuously addressing issues in western part of the county because of BRAC; utilities and education are the areas of concern. New schools are being built along the Highway 87 corridor along with retails businesses that will be in new sources of tax dollars.

To meet growing issues and needs, the extension staff surveyed citizens, government officials and leaders through a variety of methods, which included focus groups, community forums, one-on-one interviews, mailed surveys, electronic and telephone surveys. The environmental scan involved our extension advisory council, specialized committees, agricultural agencies, small business owners, volunteers, youth groups, decision makers and other external partners. The advisory leadership council and extension staff set priorities in determining the issues Cooperative Extension would address in its plan. The major issues selected to address include: Profitable and Sustainable Agriculture Systems; Safety and Security of our Food and Farm Systems; Leadership Development; Volunteer Readiness; School to Career (Youth and Adults); Natural Resources Conservation and Environmental Sustainability; Urban and Consumer Agriculture; and Healthy Eating, Physical Activity and Chronic Disease Risk Reduction.

III. Objectives to Address the Cooperative Extension Long Range Plan

Our family and consumer sciences programs improve the well-being of individuals, families, and communities.

Value* Outcome Description
32Number of adults increasing knowledge of life skills (such as goal setting, stress management, self-care and healthy relationships)
142Number of adults increasing their knowledge of community resources
47Number of people gaining basic financial management knowledge and/or skills (such as; budgeting, record keeping, goal setting, writing goals, consumer decision-making)
47Number of people gaining knowledge and/or skills in managing financial products and financial identity (such as; credit, debt management, identify theft, credit reports and scores, scams, banking skills)
81Number of people gaining knowledge and/or skills to increase family assets (such as; home ownership, Individual Development Accounts (IDAs), estate planning (including Grandma’s Yellow Pie Plate), savings and investments, retirement planning)
47Number of people gaining knowledge and/or skills to protect family assets (such as; foreclosure prevention, insurance, implementing a financial document protection strategy against natural disasters, bankruptcy prevention, etc.)
75Number of people gaining knowledge and/or skills to increase family economic security (such as; how to access: SNAP benefits, SHIIP Medicare Part D; food cost management, cost comparison skills, shop for reverse mortgages, select long term care insurance, etc.)
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
14Number of adults using effective life skills (such as goal setting, stress management, self-care and healthy relationships)
38Number of adults increasing their use of identified community resources
43Number of people implementing basic financial management strategies (such as; developing a budget, keeping records, etc.)
23Number of people actively managing their financial accounts and financial identity (such as; obtaining credit reports, choosing among credit products, implementing identity theft safeguards, opening or selecting bank accounts, etc.)
32Number of people accessing financial products and programs recognized as vehicles for wealth accumulation
8Number people implementing risk management strategies (such as; seeking HUD or other housing counseling, accessing federal or state programs to address the issue, comparing among and selecting insurance coverage, financial preparation for disasters)
15Number of people accessing programs and implementing strategies to support family economic well-being
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Our plant production programs improve production, profitability, and sustainability of the agriculture sector.

Value* Outcome Description
30Number of producers who gain skills or knowledge to increase production for local markets.
109Number of producers who improve local food marketing skills or knowledge.
279Number of pesticide applicators receiving continuing education credits
558Number of pesticide credit hours provided
374Number of crop (all plant systems) producers increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, and/or skills as related to: 1. Best management production practices (cultural, nutrient, and genetics) 2. Pest/insect, disease, weed, wildlife management 3. Financial/Farm management tools and practices (business, marketing, government policy, human resources) 4. Alternative agriculture, bioenergy, and value-added enterprises
5Number of Extension initiated and controlled county demonstration test sites
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
55Number of producers who diversified their marketing strategies into local markets (direct, intermediated/food service, institutional).
50Number of producers (and other members of the local food supply chain) who have increased revenue
30Number of new farms (beginning farmers) selling into local markets for local consumption (in this reporting period)
100Number of farmers, employees or family members adopting regular use of appropriate PPE following AgriSafe or Certified Safe Farm participation
60Number of producers reporting reduction in fertilizer used per acre
300000Number of acres in conservation tillage or other Best Management Practice
245Number of crop (all plant systems) producers adopting best management practices, including those practices related to nutrient management, conservation, production, cultivars, pest management (weeds, diseases, insects), business management, and marketing
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Our animal production programs improve production, profitability, and sustainability of the agriculture sector.

Value* Outcome Description
75Number of producers who improve local food marketing skills or knowledge.
45Number of producers who gain skills or knowledge to increase production for local markets.
150Number of animal producers who increased knowledge of farm business management, business planning, financial management, marketing, or estate planning.
40Number of animal producers who learned how to develop a management plan (i.e. grazing plan, feeding plan, drought plan, business plan, disaster plan, etc.)
75Number of producers who increased knowledge of pasture/forage management practices (field improvement, herbicide management, grazing season extension, weed control, forage quality, haylage production, nitrate testing, etc.)
20Number of producers who increased knowledge of nutrition, ration balancing, mineral supplements, breeding, and reproduction
45Number of producers who increased knowledge of the strategies to promote animal health and welfare and reduce the potential for infectious diseases through proper use of vaccines, biosecurity, detection and identification of common diseases, appropriate use of animal medications, and mitigation of antimicrobial resistance transmission
91Number of producers who increased knowledge of animal waste management practices
40Number of animal waste management credits earned through Extension programs
15Number of producers who increased knowledge of how to prepare, mitigate, and recover from natural disasters impacting animal agriculture
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
25Number of producers who diversified their marketing strategies into local markets (direct, intermediated/food service, institutional).
25Number of new farms (beginning farmers) selling into local markets for local consumption (in this reporting period)
50Number of producers (and other members of the local food supply chain) who have increased revenue
60Number of farmers, employees or family members adopting regular use of appropriate PPE following AgriSafe or Certified Safe Farm participation
20Number of producers adopting extension-recommended practices related to planning, marketing, and financial management
26Number of producers implementing Extension-recommended best management practices for animal waste management
6865Number of acres where Extension-recommended nutrient applications were used
25Number of producers who adopted Extension-recommended best management practices and production changes related to quality assurance (vaccinations, castration, culling techniques, etc.)
25Number of producers who adopted Extension-recommended best management practices and production changes related to genetic improvement (AI, heifer/bull selection)
20Number of producers who adopted Extension-recommended best management practices and production changes related to nutrition (mineral, feed rations)
45Number of producers who adopted Extension-recommended best management practices and production changes related to internal parasite management (fecals, deworming)
60Number of producers who adopted Extension-recommended best management practices related to pasture management
45Number of producers who adopted Extension-recommended best management practices and production changes related to nutrition, ration balancing, mineral supplement, breeding, and reproduction
75Number of producers using improved biosecurity practices
26Number of waste utilization/waste management plans developed or updated
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Our community development programs build strong and thriving communities.

Value* Outcome Description
105Number of participants who improved knowledge of local food and agricultural systems
76Number of participants who developed new jobs skills
136Number of adult participants acquiring the skills needed to serve as a volunteer
138Number of participants who increased their awareness, knowledge or skill in business related topics (e.g., management, product development, marketing, business structure options, business law and/or liability)
359Number of participants that increase their knowledge of disaster preparedness planning, mitigation and recovery
102Number of participants acquiring knowledge and skills to convene and lead inclusive groups
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
3800Dollar value of in-kind resources contributed by organizations or community
15Value of grants received by organizations, communities, or Extension where Extension was instrumental in initiating, facilitating, or providing technical assistant in the development of the grants to support community or economic development work
31Number of (eg., community and economic development, land use, disaster, etc.) new, revised or adopted plans that have begun to be implemented in communities, organizations, local governments, or businesses
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Our 4-H youth development programs grow the skills young people need to succeed in life and career.

Value* Outcome Description
101Number of teachers trained in 4-H STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) curriculum
1755Number of youth (students) increasing knowledge in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math)
841Total number of female participants in STEM program
36Number of high school age youth (students) participating as members of 4-H clubs
2011Number of youth increasing knowledge of life skills
182Number of children/youth who improved knowledge of local food and agricultural systems.
144Number of youth increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
176Number of youth demonstrating increased knowledge of natural resources and environmental issues
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
101Number of teachers using 4-H STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) curriculum in their classrooms
166Number of youth (students) gaining career / employability skills
33Number of youth (students) gaining entrepreneurship skills
2022Number of youth using effective life skills
38Number of youth willing to participate in conservation actions
101Number of youth increasing their physical activity
61Number of youth volunteers serving in new or expanded roles within Extension
18Number of youth volunteers serving in new or expanded roles beyond Extension, including community boards and task forces
18Number of youth assuming new/expanded leadership roles in the community
96Number of youth increasing their fruit and vegetable consumption
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Our natural resource and environmental programs conserve our precious natural resources and maintain a clean and healthy environment.

Value* Outcome Description
250Number of participants willing to participate in conservation actions (such as rain gardens, wildlife management, conservation easements, land trusts, generational planning, etc.)
2505Number of participants increasing their knowledge about best management practices (including storm water systems, septic system maintenance, erosion control, rain gardens, forestry, etc.)
4Number of child and youth educators aspiring to implement quality outdoor learning environments for children
1809Number of adults demonstrating increased knowledge of natural resources and environmental issues
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
500Number of participants that adopted recommended agroecosystem adaption strategies for production agriculture or natural resource management, including for invasive species, pest management, pollutant loads, and wetlands.
13000Number of acres under recommended agroecosystem adaption strategies for production agriculture or natural resource management, including for invasive species, pest management, pollutant loads, and wetlands.
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Our consumer horticulture programs teach families and communities about environmentally friendly methods for gardening and controlling pests.

Value* Outcome Description
135Number of individuals who gain knowledge or acquire skills related to vegetable/fruit gardening
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
5Number of individuals who grow food in community gardens.
82Number of participants who use extension-recommended best management practices in landscapes, turf, and gardens, including pest (insect, weed, disease, wildlife) and soil management
51Number of participants selecting appropriate landscape plants (adapted, drought tolerant, appropriate size, etc.)
35Number of participants growing food for home consumption
2Number of participants adopting composting
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Our food safety and nutrition programs create a safer and more sustainable food supply and improve the health and nutrition of individuals, families, and our communities.

Value* Outcome Description
48Number of participants who increase their knowledge of safe home food handling, preservation, or preparation practices
84Number of school personnel who increase their knowledge of School HACCP principles
118Number of food handlers who increase their knowledge and skills in safe food handling practices
36Number of individuals who learn how to prepare local foods, including through use of home food preservation techniques.
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
12Number of participants developing food safety plans
23Number of adults increasing their fruit and vegetables consumption
23Number of participants increasing their physical activity
23Number of participants who consume less sodium in their diet
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

IV. Number of Contacts Made by Extension

Type of ContactNumber
Face-to-face* 17,005
Non face-to-face** 282,511
Total by Extension staff in 2019 299,516
* Face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make directly with individuals through one-on-one visits, meetings, and other activities where staff members work directly with individuals.
** Non face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make indirectly with individuals by telephone, email, newsletters, news articles, radio, television, and other means.

V. Designated Grants Received by Extension

Type of GrantAmount
Contracts/Grants $163,395.00
Gifts/Donations $13,920.00
In-Kind Grants/Donations $0.00
United Way/Foundations $0.00
User Fees $8,694.39
Total $186,009.39

VI. Volunteer Involvement in Extension Programs

Number of Volunteers* Number of Volunteer Hours Known client contacts by volunteers Dollar Value at 25.43
4-H 582 5260 3055 $ 133,762.00
Advisory Leadership System 22 40 0 $ 1,017.00
Extension Community Association 52 7437 375 $ 189,123.00
Extension Master Gardener 373 2536 1068 $ 64,490.00
Other: Agriculture 29 222 4 $ 5,645.00
Other: Community, Family & Individual Development 43 79 287 $ 2,009.00
Other: Food & Nutrition 2 26 120 $ 661.00
Total: 1103 15600 4909 $ 396,708.00
* The number of volunteers reflects the overall number of volunteers for multiple events.

VII. Membership of Advisory Leadership System

Homeowner Horticulture
(Currently Being Reformed)
Carrie Bibbens
Dwight Cotton
Forestry
Jim Graves
Henry Randolph
Buren Fulmer

4-H
Hettie Fultz
Beth Blinson
Toni Swaim
Heather Broadwell
Susan Foster
Karen Jones
Lynn Lambert
Jessica Maiello
Anna Marie
Patricia McKoy
Andrew Milton
Mary Nower


Family & Consumer Science--CCR
James Goff
Dr. Pauline Calloway
Judy West
Jim Burgin
Tony Wilder
Dorothy Hales
Wanda Hardison
Elsie Lee
Jo Ann Geddie
Becky Wise
Beth Blinson
Alice Thomas
Dr. Meredith Williams
Dave Taylor
Dr. Susan Byerly
Brandy Woods
Dr. Catherine Evans
Ginger Harris-McGrintly
Community Rural Development Board--Harnett Voices
Cherry McNeill
Cornelia McKoy
Hattie Smith
Avest Smith
Stanley Price
Frances Harvey
Michael Smith
Family & Consumer Science--PAT
Dr. Connie Chester
Kathy Gower
Terri Crisp
William Baker
Tracy Barnes
Charles Royal
Glenn Johnson
Dr. Susan Byerly
Sara Bowman
Alice Thomas
Leon McKoy
Maureen Mercho
Wanda Hardison
Family & Consumer Science--TAP
Debra Hawkins
Deborah Whittington
Wendy Butcher
David Tillman
Tonya Gray
mary Lou Winchester
Lauren Cappola
Erika parker
Erin Brown
Barrett Payne
Starquasia Bond

Livestock
Dennis Eason
Ted Gardner
Buster Johnson
Cindy Johnson
Phillip Page
Veve Page
Tom Butler
Tim Stephenson
Bryan Blinson
Steven Broadwell
4-H--Girls Are Great
Deborah Hawkins
Heather Carter
Brittany Dunnigan
Jennifer Lee


4-H--Harnett County Juvenile Crime Prevention Council
Jim Burgin
Chris Carr
Shavonda Chance
Carl Davis
Resson Faircloth
Barbara McKoy
Vera Jones
Pam Little
Gary McNeill
Leslie Morris
Alice Price
Avis Smith
David Whittenton
Tony Wilder
Angie Wood
Marsha Woodall
Advisory Leadership Council
Cherry McNeill
Costella McKoy
Patsy Avery
Donna Rigby
Golda Bailey
Donna Springle
Leon McKoy
Rose Cotton, Chair
Dr. Pauline Calloway
Craig Senter
Beth Blinson
Hettie Fultz
Shirley Bryant
Howard Penny
Alice Thomas
Crops
Ricky Sears
Kent Revels
Frankie Spivey
Clay Gardner
Jeff Autry
Stephen Salmon
Ryan Patterson
Nick Dupree
Trent Wilson
CH Johnson
Beekeepers
Charles Fleming
Claude Tweed
Conrad Ward
Kurt Rhodes
Equine
Allison Delong
Ben Dixon
Effie Carroll
Harold Dixon
Jennifer Champion
Justin McLeod
Leon Carroll
Madison Reilly
Mashelle Cleckner
Norman Lichtman
Sharon McCray
Suzanne MacCallum
Taylor Harrison
Tonya Reilly
Tori Miller
Tracey Ireland
Nutrition, Health & Wellness
Belinda Raynor
Cynthia Pierce
Rose Cotton
Janet Johnson
Krista Johnson
4-H Teen Court
Mary Newton
Hettie Fultz
Betty Ellis
Patrick Dean
Shavonda Guyton
Marsha Johnson

VIII. Staff Membership

Tim Mathews
Title: County Extension Director
Phone: (910) 893-7530
Email: tim_mathews@ncsu.edu

Polly Allegra
Title: County Family Programs Manager
Phone: (910) 893-7530
Email: plallegr@ncsu.edu

Jenny Carleo
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Grain Crops
Phone: (704) 873-0507
Email: jscarleo@ncsu.edu

Richard Goforth
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Poultry
Phone: (910) 893-7530
Email: richard_goforth@ncsu.edu

Jackie Helton
Title: Extension Agent, 4-H Youth Development
Phone: (910) 814-6027
Email: jackie_helton@ncsu.edu

Marissa Herchler
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Animal Food Safety (FSMA Programs)
Phone: (919) 515-5396
Email: marissa_herchler@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Marissa is an Area Specialized Agent for animal food safety, with emphasis on the new Food Safety Modernization Act rules, as they apply to feed mills in North Carolina. Please contact Marissa with any FSMA related questions, or PCQI training inquiries.

Greg Huneycutt
Title: Extension Agent, Family and Consumer Sciences - Foods and Nutrition
Phone: (910) 893-7530
Email: greg_huneycutt@ncsu.edu

Lynette Johnston
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Food Safety
Phone: (919) 515-0303
Email: lynette_johnston@ncsu.edu

Peggie Lewis Joyce
Title: Area 4-H Agent - Central Region
Phone: (336) 242-2080
Email: peggie_lewis@ncsu.edu

Colby Lambert
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Forestry
Phone: (910) 814-6041
Email: colby_lambert@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provides educational opportunities and technical support to forest landowners, agents, and forest industry in eastern North Carolina.

Alia Langdon-Williford
Title: 4-H Program Assistant
Phone: (910) 893-7530
Email: aklangdo@ncsu.edu

Danny Lauderdale
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Ornamental Nursery and Greenhouse, Eastern Region
Phone: (252) 237-0111
Email: danny_lauderdale@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provides programming to commercial ornamental nursery and greenhouse producers in eastern North Carolina.

Selena McKoy
Title: Extension Agent, Agriculture - Commercial and Consumer Horticulture
Phone: (910) 893-7530
Email: sdmckoy@ncsu.edu

Brian Parrish
Title: Extension Agent, Agriculture - Field Crops and Livestock
Phone: (910) 893-7530
Email: brian_parrish@ncsu.edu

Kittrane Sanders
Title: Extension Agent, Community and Rural Development
Phone: (910) 893-7535
Email: kittrane_sanders@ncsu.edu

Chip Simmons
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Food Safety
Phone: (919) 414-5632
Email: odsimmon@ncsu.edu

Phillip Stewart
Phone:
Email: psstewar@ncsu.edu

Debbie Stroud
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Consumer and Retail Food Safety
Phone: (919) 515-9149
Email: dlstroud@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Area Specialized Agents in Consumer and Retail Food Safety help to ensure that Family and Consumer Sciences (FCS) Agents have access to timely, evidence-based food safety information. This is accomplished by (1) working with FCS Agents in their counties, (2) developing food safety materials and (3) planning and implementing a NC Safe Plates Food Safety Info Center.

Allan Thornton
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Commercial Vegetables and Fruits
Phone: (910) 592-7161
Email: allan_thornton@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Vegetable Extension Specialist. Conducts Extension and applied research programs for commercial vegetable and fruit growers and agents in eastern North Carolina.

Sharon Williams
Title: County Extension Administrative Assistant
Phone: (910) 893-7530
Email: sharon_williams@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Administrative Assistant to the County Extension Director, Office Manager, Payroll Coordinator, Prepares Purchase Orders and Requisitions for Agents and staff, Computer Technology Contact,

Mitch Woodward
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Watersheds and Water Quality
Phone: (919) 414-3873
Email: mdwoodwa@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: NC Cooperative Extension's Goals include: - NC's natural resources and environmental quality will be protected, conserved and enhanced. - NC will have profitable, environmentally sustainable plant, animal and food systems. Protecting our environmental resources, particularly drinking water quality, is a top priority in NC. NC Cooperative Extension is a leader in teaching, researching, and accelerating the adoption of effective water quality protection practices.

IX. Contact Information

Harnett County Center
126 Alexander Dr
Lillington, NC 27546

Phone: (910) 893-7530
Fax: (910) 893-7539
URL: http://harnett.ces.ncsu.edu