2019 Hyde County Program Impact Report

Approved: January 27, 2020

I. Executive Summary

The Hyde County Center of North Carolina Cooperative Extension partners with the county government, local organizations and local agencies to define the needs and issues of the county. Together we are improving the quality of life of the citizens of Hyde County through innovative programming.

Hyde County Cooperative Extension served on as a stakeholder in the Hyde County Community Health Assessment.
According to the 2018 Hyde County Health Assessment the significant health priorities are:
1 - Access to Health Services
2 - Diabetes
3 - Economy
4 - Exercise, Nutrition & Weight
5 - Social Environment
6 - Substance Abuse

Hyde County is apart of the Blacklands. The Blacklands are known for its unique black color and the organic matter in the soil. Not all techniques, treatments and varieties that work throughout the state work here in Hyde. Farmer's deal with drainage issues, saltwater intrusion and a variety of soil types. Salt water intrusion has been an issue for many coastal counties for decades. Repeated tidal surge from hurricanes and tropical storms has caused land to become less productive. The land that is affected in the Blacklands area is some of the most productive ag land in the state. While areas affected are relatively small, it is a persistent issue. Farmers have also started questioning if salt water could be seeping up through the soil from the ground water. NC Cooperative Extension and ECU faculty partnered together to help dig deeper into the issue of salt water intrusion. The group was awarded two grants (NCCES Gore Innovation Grant and the National Science Foundation Grant) to fund salt water intrusion research. Equipment was purchased and ground water monitoring wells were installed and data is continuing to be collected. An alternate crops trial was also established. A salt water intrusion field day was held at the test site on June 10, 2019. 75 people attended the field day. This collaborative research project has gain a lot of attention. An article about salt water intrusion was published in the "The Washington Post" and French Public Television interviewed Extension employees and farmers about the issue. A survey was sent to attendees and the response was positive. We will continue to work to find answers and possible solutions for the farmers of Eastern North Carolina.

Rural Hyde County is always seeking ways to strengthen their economy, provide better quality of life through services and building upon local assets. Hyde County faces many challenges such as declining populations, lack of jobs and overall economic growth. Hyde County Cooperative Extension is committed to help create economic, societal and intellectual prosperity to all citizens. The Hyde County Cooperative Extension Service partnered with the County of Hyde and the ECU RISE 29 Program to help strengthen our economy. Five ECU Interns were selected to focus on 3 projects within Hyde County: Restoration of the Mattamuskeet Lodge, Reopening of the Ocracoke Child Care Center and Countywide Broadband. These 5 interns are currently working on these projects. Hyde County Cooperative Extension has interviewed and assisted this group, provided an informational tour of the Mattamuskeet Lodge, and attended meetings related to these projects. This partnership with the ECU Rise 29 Program will bring much needed economic innovation into Hyde County.

The Ocracoke Child Care Center has faced many challenges over the past few years. They have opened, closed, lost funding and lost the trust with Ocracoke Island residents. The Center is currently closed but good quality care is needed. The Hyde County Cooperative Extension Director was asked to facilitate the Ocracoke Child Care Center Board Meeting on June 5 to help discover the challenges surrounding the reopening of the Center. Five Board Members, the Hyde County Department of Social Services Director, Beaufort/Hyde Partnership of Children Director, County Manager, Ocracoke Township County Commissioner, ECU Rise 29 Interns and 7 community members joined together for this meeting. The Ocracoke Child Care Center Board walked away with short term goals to help reopen the Center. A business plan will be written by the ECU Rise 29 Interns along with marketing tools. In the meantime, the Ocracoke Child Care Center will partner with Hyde County 4-H to provide programming in 4 hour segments to get the doors open. The Board will meet again in July to discuss the business plan.

Lack of resources to students at risk for economic, behavioral, and/or academic troubles is primary concern. Preventative measures can help set students up to better prepare and handle these difficult situations in home and school life. H.Y.D.E. Kids reaches 15 students in grades 3-5 at Mattamuskeet Elementary School who are exhibiting at-risk behaviors or are in family situations considered at-risk. The JCPC Coordinator works with school personnel to identify these 15 students and subsequently meets with parents or guardians to orient them to the program and complete necessary paperwork. The Coordinator then works primarily with teachers during the school day to coordinate in-school academic tutoring, individually and/or small groups, and assistance with behavior management in the classroom setting. After school, the Coordinator leads an interpersonal skill building group with activities centered around S.T.E.A.M. areas and interpersonal skills, such as improved group work, taking responsibility, self-respect, learning appropriate ways to respond to others in undesirable situations, and general every-day manners. 100% of 15 youth successfully completed H.Y.D.E. Kids program in August 2019, including minimum direct, contact hours. 87% of youth completed more than 150% of required, minimum direct contact hours (24 hours needed; most completed over 35 hours). Of the 15 students, 7 improved their ELA grade from the start of the year to the end of the year; 7 stayed the same letter grade. Of the 15 students, 4 improved their Math grade from the start of the year to the end of the year; 10 stayed the same letter grade. Some teacher feedback related to student behaviors and academics include the following: • “When his behavior was not appropriate, he was quick to realize and apologize.” • “He tends to do better quality work when he knows someone is watching and cares.” • “I have seen improvement in completion of classroom assignments.” • “He needs a caring adult. Hyde Kids gave him this.” • “ became very mannerly and considerate of others thoughts/feelings.” • “I have seen an improvement with her attitude toward her school work. She seem more confident in herself.” Some parental/guardian feedback related to student behaviors and academics include the following: • “He loves learning about new things, always excited about his meetings.” • “More motivated and doing better in math.”

The Hyde County Cooperative Extension Service programming:
Field Days
Variety Trials
Blackland Farm Managers Tour
Winter Meetings/Road Shows
Interactive Workshops
Snap-ed Classes- Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program
Food Preservation Classes
Gardening Classes
Newsletters
Social Media
Personal Visits
Workshops - Ag, 4-H, FCS, Horticulture
Summer Programming
Shooting Sports Team
School Enrichment
JCPC H.Y.D.E .Kids Program
Volunteer-based 4-H Club Meetings
4-H Special Interest Programming
4-H Camps
S.T.E.M. Fairs

II. County Background

Hyde County is a coastal county in North Carolina bordered by the Atlantic Ocean to the east, Dare, Tyrrell, and Washington Counties to the north, Beaufort County to the west and Pamlico to the south. The County is divided by the Pamlico Sound yielding Mainland Hyde and Ocracoke Island. Swan Quarter is the county seat and there are four other small villages, Sladesville, Engelhard, Fairfield, and Scranton along with numerous little communities. The land area of Hyde County is 612.80 square miles or 392,146 acres. There are 811 square miles of water in Hyde County. Of the land area, 34% is in public trust which includes the Department of Fish and Wildlife, National Park Service and North Carolina Wildlife Resources. The current population is estimated at 5,631. The make up of the population is 68% white, 29% black, and 8% Hispanic or Latino. Hyde County is considered a Tier 1 economically distressed county according to the North Carolina Department of Commerce with 17% of the population considered to be living in poverty. The leading cause of deaths are cancer, diseases of the heart and diabetes. According to the Nutrition and Physical Activity Surveillance system an average of 31% of 2-4 year olds are considered overweight or obese. Also, the Hyde County School reported that 47% of middle schoolers were considered overweight or obese in 2014.

Agriculture is the #1 industry in Hyde County. Bringing in over $154 million in revenue in 2016.
Hyde County ranked the following in production:
Corn for Grain - 5th
Cotton - 15th
Wheat - 41st
Soybeans - 13th
Hyde County is apart of the Blacklands. The Blacklands are known for its unique black color and the organic matter in the soil. Not all techniques, treatments and varieties that work throughout the state work here in Hyde. Farmer's deal with drainage issues, saltwater intrusion and a variety of soil types.

Hyde County Cooperative Extension served on as a stakeholder in the Hyde County Community Health Assessment.
According to the Hyde County Health Assessment the top 3 health priorities are:
1 - Physical Activity/Nutrition
2 - Access to Primary Care
3 - Substance Abuse

The Hyde County Center of North Carolina Cooperative Extension partners with the county government, local organizations and local agencies to define the needs and issues of the county. Together we are improving the quality of life of the citizens of Hyde County through innovative programming.

The Hyde County Cooperative Extension Service programming:
Field Days
Variety Trials
Blackland Farm Managers Tour
Winter Meetings/Road Shows
Interactive Workshops
Snap-ed Classes- Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program
Newsletters
Social Media
Personal Visits
Workshops - Ag, 4-H, FCS, Horticulture
Summer Programming
Shooting Sports Team
School Enrichment
JCPC H.Y.D.E .Kids Program
Volunteer-based 4-H Club Meetings
4-H Special Interest Programming
4-H Camps
S.T.E.M. Fairs

III. Objectives to Address the Cooperative Extension Long Range Plan

Our family and consumer sciences programs improve the well-being of individuals, families, and communities.

Value* Outcome Description
15Number of adults increasing knowledge of life skills (such as goal setting, stress management, self-care and healthy relationships)
7Number of adults increasing their knowledge of community resources
15Number of adults and professionals increasing their knowledge of human development over the life course and emerging best practices in parenting and caregiving
15Number of parents and other caregivers of children increasing their knowledge of positive parenting practices (such as communication and discipline)
17Number of people gaining knowledge and/or skills to increase family economic security (such as; how to access: SNAP benefits, SHIIP Medicare Part D; food cost management, cost comparison skills, shop for reverse mortgages, select long term care insurance, etc.)
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
32Number of adults using effective life skills (such as goal setting, stress management, self-care and healthy relationships)
15Number of adults increasing their use of identified community resources
15Number of professionals using learned best practices with children/youth/adults/older adults
15Number of parents/other caregivers of children adopting positive parenting practices (such as communication and discipline)
15Number of people actively managing their financial accounts and financial identity (such as; obtaining credit reports, choosing among credit products, implementing identity theft safeguards, opening or selecting bank accounts, etc.)
3Number of people accessing financial products and programs recognized as vehicles for wealth accumulation
27Number people implementing risk management strategies (such as; seeking HUD or other housing counseling, accessing federal or state programs to address the issue, comparing among and selecting insurance coverage, financial preparation for disasters)
15Number of people accessing programs and implementing strategies to support family economic well-being
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Our plant production programs improve production, profitability, and sustainability of the agriculture sector.

Value* Outcome Description
5Number of producers who gain skills or knowledge to increase production for local markets.
2Number of producers who improve local food marketing skills or knowledge.
80Number of pesticide applicators receiving continuing education credits
16Number of pesticide credit hours provided
1Number of Certified Crops Advisors receiving continuing education credits
96Number of crop (all plant systems) producers increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, and/or skills as related to: 1. Best management production practices (cultural, nutrient, and genetics) 2. Pest/insect, disease, weed, wildlife management 3. Financial/Farm management tools and practices (business, marketing, government policy, human resources) 4. Alternative agriculture, bioenergy, and value-added enterprises
24Number of Extension initiated and controlled county demonstration test sites
18Number of Certified Crops Advisors credit hours provided
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
0Number of producers (and other members of the local food supply chain) who have increased revenue
60Number of producers reporting reduction in fertilizer used per acre
208Number of acres in conservation tillage or other Best Management Practice
70Number of crop (all plant systems) producers adopting best management practices, including those practices related to nutrient management, conservation, production, cultivars, pest management (weeds, diseases, insects), business management, and marketing
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Our community development programs build strong and thriving communities.

Value* Outcome Description
491Number of adult participants acquiring the skills needed to serve as a volunteer
8Number of participants who increased their awareness, knowledge or skill in business related topics (e.g., management, product development, marketing, business structure options, business law and/or liability)
49Number of participants acquiring knowledge and skills to convene and lead inclusive groups
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
5000Dollar value of in-kind resources contributed by organizations or community
8Value of grants received by organizations, communities, or Extension where Extension was instrumental in initiating, facilitating, or providing technical assistant in the development of the grants to support community or economic development work
1Number of (eg., community and economic development, land use, disaster, etc.) new, revised or adopted plans that have begun to be implemented in communities, organizations, local governments, or businesses
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Our 4-H youth development programs grow the skills young people need to succeed in life and career.

Value* Outcome Description
4Number of teachers trained in 4-H STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) curriculum
382Number of youth (students) increasing knowledge in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math)
176Total number of female participants in STEM program
15Number of youth (students) participating in 4-H dropout prevention (student at-risk) programs
7Number of high school age youth (students) participating as members of 4-H clubs
217Number of youth increasing knowledge of life skills
22Number of children/youth who improved knowledge of local food and agricultural systems.
55Number of youth increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
133Number of youth demonstrating increased knowledge of natural resources and environmental issues
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
3Number of teachers using 4-H STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) curriculum in their classrooms
37Number of youth (students) gaining career / employability skills
10Number of youth (students) gaining entrepreneurship skills
187Number of youth using effective life skills
133Number of youth willing to participate in conservation actions
170Number of youth increasing their physical activity
4Number of youth volunteers serving in new or expanded roles beyond Extension, including community boards and task forces
37Number of youth increasing their fruit and vegetable consumption
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Our consumer horticulture programs teach families and communities about environmentally friendly methods for gardening and controlling pests.

Our food safety and nutrition programs create a safer and more sustainable food supply and improve the health and nutrition of individuals, families, and our communities.

Value* Outcome Description
37Number of participants who increase their knowledge of safe home food handling, preservation, or preparation practices
37Number of individuals who learn how to prepare local foods, including through use of home food preservation techniques.
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
2Number of new and existing access points for consumers that expand or improve their offering of local fruits and vegetables. Access points include farmers markets, retail stores, school food programs, community gardens, institutions other than schools (e.g. hospitals, universities, etc.), and other systems/access points not noted (e.g. restaurants, etc.).
7Number of adults increasing their fruit and vegetables consumption
37Number of participants increasing their physical activity
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

IV. Number of Contacts Made by Extension

Type of ContactNumber
Face-to-face* 5,818
Non face-to-face** 1,309,749
Total by Extension staff in 2019 1,315,567
* Face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make directly with individuals through one-on-one visits, meetings, and other activities where staff members work directly with individuals.
** Non face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make indirectly with individuals by telephone, email, newsletters, news articles, radio, television, and other means.

V. Designated Grants Received by Extension

Type of GrantAmount
Contracts/Grants $32,722.00
Gifts/Donations $19,183.56
In-Kind Grants/Donations $0.00
United Way/Foundations $0.00
User Fees $0.00
Total $51,905.56

VI. Volunteer Involvement in Extension Programs

Number of Volunteers* Number of Volunteer Hours Known client contacts by volunteers Dollar Value at 25.43
4-H 158 1421 945 $ 36,136.00
Advisory Leadership System 49 112 61 $ 2,848.00
Extension Community Association 16 20 19 $ 509.00
Other: Agriculture 11 100 500 $ 2,543.00
Other: Community, Family & Individual Development 24 200 162 $ 5,086.00
Total: 258 1853 1687 $ 47,122.00
* The number of volunteers reflects the overall number of volunteers for multiple events.

VII. Membership of Advisory Leadership System

Hyde County 4-H Advisory Leadership
Karen Mason - Home School Teacher
Julio Morales - ESL Teacher MECHS
Alishia Holloway - MES Afterschool Program
Chase Luker - 4-H Program Outreach/Volunteer
Sherri Cox - MES Teacher
Chad Green - Community Member
Leslie Cole - Ocracoke School Principal
Guire Cahoon - Hyde County Sheriff
Kris Noble - Assistant County Manager
Anthony Roper - Pastor/Faith-based Community
Floy Loftus - Volunteer/School Administrator
Zac Eakes - Honorary 4-H Teen
Hyde County 4-H Livestock Show Committee
Jay Eakes
Dawn Davis
Lindsey Mooney
Emma Williams
James Topping
Dawn Armstrong
Daryl Smith
Kathy Williford
Chad Spencer
Suzanne Torres
Jaime Jones
Hyde County Advisory Council
Anna Shaffer - Hyde County Health Department
Julio Morales - Hyde County ESL Teacher
Kris Noble - Assitant County Manager and Hyde County Planner
Karen Mason - 4-H / Home School Parent
Andy Holloway - Northeast Workforce/JCPC
Richard Mann - Hyde County Farmer
Alice Mackey - ADPAT Center/Davis Ventures
Sandra Tunnell - State Advisory
Zac Eakes - Youth Representative/4-H
Kim Meacham - Ocracoke
Agricultural Advisory Committee
Dawson Pugh
Tony Carawan
Dick Tunnell
Richard Mann
Isaac Boerema
Ray Tooley
Hyde County Parks and Recreation Advisory Committee
Ben Simmons
Barry Swindell
Daryl Smith
Andy Holloway
Emma Williams
Brandon Marshall
Kris Noble
Anna Schaffer
Randy Etheridge

VIII. Staff Membership

Natalie Wayne
Title: County Extension Director, Hyde and Tyrrell
Phone: (252) 926-4489
Email: natalie_wayne@ncsu.edu

CatieJo Black
Title: Extension Agent - Family and Consumer Sciences
Phone: (252) 926-5278
Email: catiejo_black@ncsu.edu

Lee Brimmage
Title: Extension Agent, 4-H Youth Development
Phone: (252) 926-4487
Email: lee_brimmage@ncsu.edu

Connie Burleson
Title: County Extension Administrative Assistant
Phone: (252) 943-8570
Email: connie_burleson@ncsu.edu

Candice Christian
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Consumer and Retail Food Safety
Phone: (919) 515-9148
Email: cadescha@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: The overall goal of the Area Specialized Agents (ASAs) in Consumer & Retail Food Safety is to provide North Carolinians with technical food safety information and to support Family and Consumer Sciences agents in delivering timely and evidence-based food safety education and information to stakeholders.

Erin Eure
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Commercial Fruits and Vegetables
Phone: (252) 357-1400
Email: erin_eure@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provides educational opportunities and technical support to commercial fruit and vegetable growers, agents, and industry in northeastern NC.

Gene Fox
Title: Area Agent, Agriculture - Consumer Horticulture
Phone: (252) 946-0111
Email: gene_fox@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: I work in all areas of home horticulture from vegetables and fruit to ornamentals, houseplants, and lawns. I also work with commercial landscapers in the area to provide their continuing education credits.

Steve Gabel
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Aquaculture
Phone: (252) 482-6585
Email: steve_gabel@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Responsible for aquaculture educational programs for the NC NE extension district.

Andrea Gibbs
Title: Extension Agent, Agriculture - Field Crops
Phone: (252) 926-4488
Email: andrea_gibbs@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Andrea’s areas of responsibility include field crops, fresh market and wholesale vegetable crops, commercial and home agriculture, & pesticide education and certification.

Marissa Herchler
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Animal Food Safety (FSMA Programs)
Phone: (919) 515-5396
Email: marissa_herchler@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Marissa is an Area Specialized Agent for animal food safety, with emphasis on the new Food Safety Modernization Act rules, as they apply to feed mills in North Carolina. Please contact Marissa with any FSMA related questions, or PCQI training inquiries.

Lynette Johnston
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Food Safety
Phone: (919) 515-0303
Email: lynette_johnston@ncsu.edu

Danny Lauderdale
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Ornamental Nursery and Greenhouse, Eastern Region
Phone: (252) 237-0111
Email: danny_lauderdale@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provides programming to commercial ornamental nursery and greenhouse producers in eastern North Carolina.

Mary Mann
Phone:
Email: memann2@ncsu.edu

Lori McBryde
Title: Area 4-H Agent, East Region
Phone: (919) 989-5380
Email: lori_mcbryde@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provide support the Eastern 34 Counties of the Northeast and Southeast Districts in 4-H Youth Development.

Margaret Ross
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Poultry
Phone: (252) 670-8254
Email: margaret_ross@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Working with commercial poultry producers to assist in writing nutrient management plans and conducting educational programming.

Chip Simmons
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Food Safety
Phone: (919) 414-5632
Email: odsimmon@ncsu.edu

Scott Tilley
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Grain
Phone: (252) 793-4428
Email: scott_tilley@ncsu.edu

Mitch Woodward
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Watersheds and Water Quality
Phone: (919) 414-3873
Email: mdwoodwa@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: NC Cooperative Extension's Goals include: - NC's natural resources and environmental quality will be protected, conserved and enhanced. - NC will have profitable, environmentally sustainable plant, animal and food systems. Protecting our environmental resources, particularly drinking water quality, is a top priority in NC. NC Cooperative Extension is a leader in teaching, researching, and accelerating the adoption of effective water quality protection practices.

IX. Contact Information

Hyde County Center
30 Oyster Creek Rd
Hyde County Government Center
Swan Quarter, NC 27885

Phone: (252) 926-4486
Fax: (252) 926-3705
URL: http://hyde.ces.ncsu.edu