2018 Johnston County Program Impact Report

Approved: January 23, 2019

I. Executive Summary

The Johnston County Extension team worked diligently in 2018 to address issues facing the county and its people. Issues and needs were ascertained through citizen input, economic indicators, and other sources of data. Identified areas of critical importance include: farm profitability and sustainability, local foods, farm & food safety, volunteer service, life skills and leadership development for youth, nutrition, chronic disease prevention, and consumer horticulture.

Agriculture and related agribusinesses comprise 10.0% of Johnston County’s gross product and account for 10.5% of all employment. This industry is vitally important to the local economy, contributing over $462 million (value-added) annually and providing diversification and stability in the local economy. Over 3,800 Johnston County farmers, agribusiness leaders, and farm workers have improved the profitability and sustainability of their businesses and lives through participation in extension programs in 2018. Notable agricultural impacts include: improved yields, improved pest management, reduced fuel consumption, better variety selection, improved marketing techniques, acquiring certification and continuing education, and improved safety for farmers, their families, and their workers. Extension agents also assisted farmers following Hurricanes Florence and Michael in varied ways including assistance with application for NC disaster funding estimated at $9.1 million for Johnston farms. By adopting recommended practices and participating in extension programs, farmers and agribusinesses have reduced environmental impacts of waste products, pesticides, and fertilizers. Extension efforts are critical to the continued sustainability of the agricultural industry in Johnston County and have resulted in a total impact of more than $21 million for local farmers and forest landowners in 2018 by either reducing costs or increasing productivity.

Cooperative Extension classes give homeowners the knowledge to enhance the value of their landscapes while protecting natural resources through planting drought tolerant and/or native plants, conserving water through proper landscaping techniques, and lawn maintenance. Implementation of these practices provides food and shelter for wildlife, reduces erosion and runoff of chemicals, and reduces strain on local water resources. Production of fruits and vegetables in home landscapes has increased as a result of extension classes and information. These horticulture programs are enhanced through the efforts of 59 trained Extension Master Gardener Volunteers. Based on survey results indicating an average $75 value per consultation, the information provided by the extension agent and the Extension Master Gardener Volunteers to 4,567 clients was worth $342,525 in 2018. Additionally, the volunteers contributed 9,276 hours of their time at a value of $24.69 per hour for a total of $229,024 along other contributions to support the program. Cooperative Extension helped Johnston County Nurserymen in 2018 become more successful by providing educational presentations, nursery tours, and trade shows. Because of these educational meetings and tours, many nurseries have implemented efficiency, mechanization, and innovative strategies, and have been able to operate their nursery with less labor, or not hire any additional, and a few have or plan to expand their nurseries.

4-H has expanded and adapted to reach the increasing number of youth in Johnston County. A total of 5496 youth participated in 4-H programs in 2018. Youth learned and employed critical life skills in the areas of consumer and family science, animal and plant science, and healthy lifestyles. The skills these youth gain will mean better jobs, higher wages, improved quality of life, and more achievement in leadership roles. Johnston County 4-H has twenty-three community clubs for youth to join or they can participate as members at large. An ASPIRE ACT prep program was taught over 10-weeks during the summer. Seven participants increased their test scores in English by an average of 3 points. At the 2018 4-H Youth Livestock Show and Sale, 110 young people earned over $146,000 or over $1000 per child. The majority of this income is used to support a college education for participants. Three 4-H’ers from across the county also earned $5,300 in college scholarships.

Extension programs for families and consumers addressed a variety of issues in 2018 in the areas of food safety and nutrition. Foodborne illness results in 128,000 hospitalizations and 3,000 deaths annually in the United States. There were 16 Johnston County Community and Senior Services employees trained in food safety and 8 Food Protection Manager Certifications earned by those in retail food businesses in Johnston County. Additionally, the Family and Consumer Sciences Agent has worked closely with Johnston County employees to offer nutrition and cooking classes. Those with hypertension spend $2,000 more annually on health care (American Heart Association) and those with diabetes spend $9,600 directly attributed to diabetes (American Diabetes Association). One participant has reported a 13 point decrease in cholesterol levels, lost 12 pounds, and was able to reduce her A1C levels to a normal range. Additionally, participants from the FCS program have reported eating at home more often, reducing sodium, reducing saturated fat, and drinking less sugar-sweetened beverages. These changes will undoubtedly result in long-term health and financial benefits.

Extension programs have touched the lives of many Johnston County citizens through multiple delivery methods this year. This includes reaching 19,077 individuals in person either one-on-one or through a face-to-face educational presentations, Another 87,396 were reached through phone calls and written communication, other than mass media. These efforts and accomplishments have been made possible through local community support including Johnston County Extension Advisory Leadership, volunteers, local businesses, government agencies, non-profit organizations, and the Johnston County Commissioners. Private and grant funding sources have contributed $218,870 to support Johnston County Extension programs this year. In addition, 915 volunteers contributed 16,742 hours of their time to support development and delivery of Cooperative Extension programs in the county. While it is estimated that the total monetary value of volunteer time contribution is $413,360, this value is overshadowed by their accomplishments and those of the extension center staff to enrich the lives, land, and economic prosperity of Johnston County people.

II. County Background

From a geographic perspective, Johnston County is located along the fall line with 20 percent of the land in the Southern Piedmont and 65 percent in the middle and upper Coastal Plain regions of North Carolina. The remaining 15 percent of the land area is in the flood plains and terraces along the Neuse River, a critical water resource for the county.

In the same way that the geography varies in the county, there is tremendous diversity with respect to very rural agricultural areas compared to rapidly developing regions. The 2010 US census reported a population of 168,878 an increase of 46,913 from 2000, a 38% increase, establishing Johnston County as one of the fastest growing counties in NC. While current statistics vary, Johnston County continues to be one of the top growth counties in the state and one of the top 100 growth counties in the nation. Major residential growth is occurring along the Wake/Johnston border and especially near Clayton, Cleveland Township, McGee’s Crossroads, and Wilders Township and the great recession decline in construction appears to have ended. Major US Highways (I-95, I-40, and US 70/I-42) have a substantial influence on residential, commercial, and industrial development in Johnston County. Improvements to US 70/I-42 will likely result in further development along the corridor from Clayton to Princeton.

The county population is diverse with 74.2% white, 15.1% black or African American, and 12.9% Hispanic/Latino according to the 2010 US Census. The Hispanic/Latino population has increased significantly from a US Census estimate of 10.5% in 2006, 7.7% in 2000, and less than 2% in 1990.

In spite of rapid residential growth, agriculture continues to hold an important place in Johnston County economy. Important agricultural commodities in Johnston County are flue-cured tobacco, greenhouse and nursery crops, sweet potatoes, cattle, swine, poultry, grains, cotton, and fresh market vegetables. In 2016, Johnston County was the second ranked tobacco producing county in the state of North Carolina. The county routinely ranks as one of the top greenhouse and nursery, and sweet potato producing counties, and 8th with respect to farm cash receipts in the state. The agricultural sector is expected to continue to be strong in the future while continuing to transition in response to the local economy. In 2018, economic indicators point to another weak year for the agricultural economy due to declining demand for tobacco, depressed commodity prices, and the strong dollar slowing exports.

The Cooperative Extension staff conducts regular environmental scans to determine key issues and needs for the county and its citizens. This process includes collaborating with the statewide environmental scan in 2012/2013. The Johnston County Cooperative Extension Advisory Council provides input on the issues and needs for the county and assists the staff with prioritization of the issues. Priority issues include farm profitability and sustainability, pressure on natural resources (water and land), life skills and leadership development in youth, food safety, and chronic disease prevention.

The following objectives constitute the plan for Cooperative Extension in Johnston County to address these priority issues. This will be a team effort for the entire Extension staff and volunteers in partnership with other local and regional entities.

III. Objectives to Address the Cooperative Extension Long Range Plan

North Carolina's plant production systems will become more profitable and sustainable.

Value* Outcome Description
3838Number of crop (all plant systems) producers increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, and/or skills as related to: 1. Best management production practices (cultural, nutrient, and genetics) 2. Pest/insect, disease, weed, wildlife management 3. Financial/Farm management tools and practices (business, marketing, government policy, human resources) 4. Alternative agriculture, bioenergy, and value-added enterprises
43Number of Extension initiated and controlled County demonstration test sites (new required for GLF/PSI reporting)
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
1726Number of crop (all plant systems) producers adopting best management practices, including those practices related to nutrient management, conservation, production, cultivars, pest management (weeds, diseases, insects), business management, and marketing
20393314Net income gains realized by the adoption of best management practices, including those practices related to nutrient management, conservation, production, cultivars, pest management (weeds, diseases, insects), business management, and marketing
1096Number of producers reporting increased dollar returns per acre or reduced costs per acre
74Number of producers reporting reduction in fertilizer used per acre
89757Number of acres in conservation tillage or other Best Management Practice
5Number of producers who adopted a dedicated bioenergy crop
345Number of acres planted to a dedicated bioenergy crop
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

North Carolina's animal production systems will become more profitable and sustainable.

Value* Outcome Description
115Number of animal producers increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, and/or skills as related to: 1. Best management production practices (cultural, nutrient, and genetics) 2. Pest/insect, disease, weed, wildlife management 3. Financial/Farm management tools and practices (business, marketing, government policy, human resources) 4. Alternative agriculture, bioenergy, and value-added enterprises
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
115Number of animal producers adopting Extension-recommended best management practices, including those practices related to husbandry, improved planning, marketing, and financial practices
69641Net income gains by producers adopting Extension-recommended best management practices, including those practices related to husbandry, improved planning, marketing, and financial practices
39Number of animal producers implementing Extension-recommended best management practices for animal waste management
39Number of waste management certifications gained or maintained due to Extension education efforts
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Producers will increase sales of food locally to more agriculturally aware consumers through market development, producer and consumer education, and new farmer and infrastructure support.

Value* Outcome Description
258Number of adults (including producers, food business owners, etc.) who improved knowledge of local food and agricultural systems.
29Number of children/youth who improved knowledge of local food and agricultural systems.
16Number of individuals who learn how to prepare local foods, including through use of home food preservation techniques.
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
33Number of new and existing access points for consumers that expand or improve their offering of local fruits and vegetables. Access points include farmers markets, retail stores, school food programs, community gardens, institutions other than schools (e.g. hospitals, universities, etc.), and other systems/access points not noted (e.g. restaurants, etc.).
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Agricultural producers, workers, food handlers and consumers will adopt safer food and agricultural production, handling, and distribution practices that reduce workplace and home injuries/illnesses, enhance food security, and increase the quality and safety of food that North Carolinians prepare and consume.

Value* Outcome Description
158Number of commercial/public operators trained
38Number of pesticide application credit hours provided
122Number of participants participating in AgriSafe personal protective equipment (PPE) selection or fit testing
12Number of food service employees receiving ServSafe certification
39Number of participants trained in safe home food handling, preservation, or preparation practices
33TOTAL number of food handlers receiving food safety training and education in safe food handling practices (new required data for federal reporting)
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
53Number of participants that have adopted farm safety practices
211Number of persons certified in Good Agricultural Practices (GAPs) or Good Handling Practices (GHPs)
12Number of participants developing food safety plans
1425000Value of reduced risk of farm and food hazards
15Number of eligible participants enrolled in Food Stamp program
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Youth and adults will address community issues and/or challenges through volunteerism.

Value* Outcome Description
34Number of adult participants acquiring the skills needed to serve as a volunteer
6Number of youth participants reporting aspirations to serve in new or expanded volunteer roles in community
24Number of hours adult volunteer training conducted
10Number of hours youth volunteer training conducted
8Number new volunteers recruited
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
192Increased number of hours contributed by trained adult volunteers
3Number of youth volunteers serving in new or expanded roles within Extension
3Number of youth volunteers serving in new or expanded roles beyond Extension, including community boards and task forces
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Futures that Work: School to Career Pathways

Value* Outcome Description
445Number of teachers trained in 4-H STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) curriculum
5916Number of youth (students) increasing knowledge in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math)
2996Total number of female participants in STEM program
500Number of high school age youth (students) participating as members of 4-H clubs
255Number of youth (students) increasing knowledge of career/employability skills
110Number of adults increasing knowledge of career/employability skills
255Number of youth (students) increasing knowledge of entrepreneurship
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
307Number of teachers using 4-H STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) curriculum in their classrooms
5916Number of youth (students) gaining knowledge in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math)
256Number of youth (students) gaining career / employability skills
255Number of youth (students) gaining entrepreneurship skills
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Consumers and communities will enhance the value of plants, animals, and landscapes while conserving valuable natural resources and protecting the environment.

Value* Outcome Description
5692Number of participants improving knowledge, attitude, skills and aspirations regarding gardening and landscape practices including plant selection and placement, turfgrass management, soil management, growing food, water conservation and water quality preservation, storm water and erosion management, green waste management, pest and wildlife management
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
5692Number of participants who use extension-recommended best management practices in landscapes, turf, and gardens, including pest (insect, weed, disease) management, fertility management, water conservation, water quality preservation and pruning techniques
284600Total cost savings from the use of extension-recommended best management practices in landscapes, turf, and gardens, including pest (insect, weed, disease) management, fertility management, water conservation, water quality preservation and pruning techniques
28Number of participants who use extension-recommended pest management practices in homes, public facilities, businesses or in community pest management programs
3500Cost savings from using extension-recommended pest management practices in homes, public facilities, businesses or in community pest management programs
436Number of participants selecting appropriate landscape plants (adapted, drought tolerant, appropriate size, etc.)
54500Cost savings from the appropriate selection of landscape plants
355Number of participants growing food for home consumption
131350Value of produce grown for home consumption
59Number of participants adopting composting
59Reduced tonnage of greenwaste as a result of Extension-recommended practices including composting and proper plant selection
6Number of participants implementing extension-recommended practices to conserve water use and protect water qualty
5790Costs savings from implementing extension-recommended practices to conserve water use and protect water qualtiy
6Number of participants implementing extension-recommended practices to conserve water use and protect water qualtiy
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Youth and adult program participants will make healthy food choices, achieve the recommended amount of physical activity and reduce risk factors for chronic diseases.

Value* Impact Description
200Number of adults increasing their fruit and vegetables consumption
33Number of youth increasing their fruit and vegetable consumption
200Number of participants reducing their BMI
200Number of adults who reduce their blood pressure
200Number of adults who improve their blood glucose (A1c.)level
200Number of adults who reduce their total cholesterol
200Number of participants who consume less sodium in their diet
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

IV. Number of Contacts Made by Extension

Type of ContactNumber
Face-to-face* 18,980
Non face-to-face** 87,396
Total by Extension staff in 2018 106,376
* Face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make directly with individuals through one-on-one visits, meetings, and other activities where staff members work directly with individuals.
** Non face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make indirectly with individuals by telephone, email, newsletters, news articles, radio, television, and other means.

V. Designated Grants Received by Extension

Type of GrantAmount
Contracts/Grants $9,000.00
Gifts/Donations $178,268.42
In-Kind Grants/Donations $4,281.90
United Way/Foundations $0.00
User Fees $27,320.00
Total $218,870.32

VI. Volunteer Involvement in Extension Programs

Number of Volunteers* Number of Volunteer Hours Known client contacts by volunteers Dollar Value at 24.69
4-H: 686 5,305 13,352 $ 130,980.00
Advisory Leadership System: 84 239 0 $ 5,901.00
Extension Community Association: 6 1,248 120 $ 30,813.00
Extension Master Gardener: 59 9,276 2,446 $ 229,024.00
Other: 80 747 215 $ 18,443.00
Total: 915 16815 16133 $ 415,162.00
* The number of volunteers reflects the overall number of volunteers for multiple events.

VII. Membership of Advisory Leadership System

Johnston County Advisory Council
John Sugg
Jeffery Lee
Judy Meyer
Billy McLamb
Gene Cox
Mark Wellons
Cynthia Toudle
Elaine McPherson
Joann Steward
Shannon Boswell
Benjy Woodard
Tami Thompson
Lane Gregory
Ruth Holcomb
Johnston County Master Gardener Specialized Committee
Vicki Shore
Joanne King
Eloise Adams
Roy Lewis
Valerie Little
Margery Pearl
Brenda Clayton
Tiffany Whichard
4-H & Youth Advisory Council
Denise Bricker
Kristi Pettit
Gene Cox
Dorothy Johnson
Rosa Andrews
Lora Bedford
Mamie Moore
Cathy Creech
Keith Beamon

Johnston County 4-H Alumni Council
Lou Woodard
Justin Powell
Ron Hughes
Charles Creech
Carmen Creech
Cathy Creech
Amanda Hughes
Jamie Thompson
Kristi Petit
Martha Stovall
Eleanor Creech
Loretta Langdon
James Reid
Johnston County 4-H Horse Council
Christine Williams
Hannah Braundel
Denise Bricker
Diane McAlin
Kate McAlin
Natalie Weeks
Tori Gwaltney
Sherry Edwards


Youth Livestock Specialized Committe
Eric Honeycutt
Katina Anderson
Chandra Farmer
Kendall Parker
Dane Williford
Sandy Batten
Maggie Earle
Harvey Blackman
Cynthia Lee
Elaine Wood
Joy Leigh Hinnant
Jon Brown
Rick Bedford
Tony Crocker
Beef Specialized Committee
Todd Marcom
H. B. Powell
Russell Wood
Jody Boswell
Gene Cox
Craig Ennis
Ervin Smith
Hunter Boone
Norman Denning, Jr.
Goat Specialized Committee
Leslie Averill
Don Edwards
Renay Edwards
Rebecca Gessner
Heather Glennon
David Brewer
Dan Murphy
Steve Nordan
Christine Holloman
Holly Hayes

Forestry Specialized Committee
Adam Huffman
Don Rogers
Mike Winslowe
Matthew Ellis
James Massey
Field Crops Specialized Committee
Donnie Barefoot
Susan Ford
Eric Westbrook
Stephen Jones
Dan Kornegay
Hunter Langdon
Johnston County Voluntary Agricultural District Board
Tom Vinson
Stephen Jones
Cookie Pope
Myron Smith
Jeremy Smith
John R. Suggs
Don Holloman
Johnston County Beekeepers Association
Al Hildreth
Barney Biles
Thomas Anderson
Adam Pendergrass
Thunder Hawk
May Markoff
Johnston County Farm-City Week Committee
Gene Cox
Michelle Davis
Joe Gregory
Kim LeQuire
Lori McBryde
Weston McCorkle
Cindy McKenzie
Mary Hunter Olive
Billy Parrish
Carl Paschal
Denise Penny
Cookie Pope
Mark Wellons
FCS Program Committee
Elaine McPherson
Kimetha Fulwood
John Phillips
Cynthia Toudle
Flora H. Grantham
Vegetable Crops Advisory Committee
Bill Foote
Jim Jones
Sue Leggett
Kelly McIver
Wayne Worley
Danny Kornegay
Keith Smith
Monica Wood
Marshall Lee

VIII. Staff Membership

Bryant Spivey
Title: County Extension Director
Phone: (919) 989-5380
Email: bryant_spivey@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Responsibilities include administration and tobacco education programs.

Tim Britton
Title: Extension Agent, Agriculture - Field Crops
Phone: (919) 989-5380
Email: tim_britton@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Responsibilities included assisting growers with problem diagnosis, variety selection, disease, weed and insect identification in field crops and developing educational programs for individuals with pesticide licenses.

Luis Cruz Santiago
Title: Farmworkers Health & Safety Educator, Agriculture - Field Crops
Phone: (919) 731-1607
Email: luis_cruz-santiago@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Luis Cruz Santiago is the Farmworkers Health & Safety Educator and Worker Protection Standard Designated Trainer with NC State Extension. His responsibilities include but not limiting to assisting farmers, farm labor contractors, and farmworkers and their families to: a) provide farmworkers health and safety training, b) develop partnerships with community organizations, agencies, programs, and members to identify educational needs and opportunities for farmworkers and their families, c) connect farmworkers and their families with other extension and community services, d) promote and lead the annual local farmworkers festival, e) provide a two-way comprehensive farmworkers safety and health training to farmers and farm labor contractors across the state of North Carolina.

Erin Eure
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Commercial Fruits & Vegetables
Phone: (252) 357-1400
Email: erin_eure@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provides educational opportunities and technical support to commercial fruit and vegetable growers, agents, and industry in northeastern NC.

Angie Faison
Title: County Extension Support Specialist, 4-H Department, Horticulture, Field Crops
Phone: (919) 989-5380
Email: angie_faison@ncsu.edu

Mike Frinsko
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Aquaculture
Phone: (252) 448-9621
Email: mike_frinsko@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provide technical training and assistance to commercial aquaculture producers in the Southeast Extension District

Cassidy Hall
Title: Area Extension Agent
Phone: (919) 989-5380
Email: cdhobbs3@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: My goal is to educate consumers how to better their health through food-based programs. I encourage healthy lifestyles through nutrition education programs and food preservation. I serve as a resource to community members who want to live healthy on a budget while working with markets, food pantries, and community partners.

Marissa Herchler
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Animal Food Safety (FSMA Programs)
Phone: (919) 515-5396
Email: marissa_herchler@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Marissa is an Area Specialized Agent for animal food safety, with emphasis on the new Food Safety Modernization Act rules, as they apply to feed mills in North Carolina. Please contact Marissa with any FSMA related questions, or PCQI training inquiries.

Lynette Johnston
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Food Safety
Phone: (919) 515-0303
Email: lynette_johnston@ncsu.edu

Colby Lambert
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Forestry
Phone: (910) 814-6041
Email: colby_lambert@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provides educational opportunities and technical support to forest landowners, agents, and forest industry in eastern North Carolina.

Danny Lauderdale
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Nursery and Greenhouse, Eastern Region
Phone: (252) 237-0111
Email: danny_lauderdale@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provides programming to commercial ornamental nursery and greenhouse producers in eastern North Carolina.

Bill Lord
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Water Resources
Phone: (919) 496-3344
Email: william_lord@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Water quality education and technical assistance

Lori McBryde
Title: Extension Agent, 4-H Youth Development
Phone: (919) 989-5380
Email: lori_mcbryde@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provide overall management of the 4-H program, youth development, school enrichment programs, 4-H clubs, resource development, and leadership, citizenship, community service education

Katie Moore
Title: County Extension Administrative Assistant
Phone: (919) 989-5380
Email: katie_moore@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provides administrative assistance to County Extension Director and manages rental of the building auditorium.

Brandon Parker
Title: Extension Agent, Agriculture - Commercial Horticulture
Phone: (919) 989-5380
Email: brandon_parker@ncsu.edu

Laura Pilkington
Title: 4-H Program Associate, 4-H Youth Development
Phone: (919) 989-5380
Email: laura_pilkington@ncsu.edu

Crystal Pope
Title: County Extension Administrative Secretary, Agriculture - Agriculture & FCS
Phone: (919) 989-5380
Email: crystal_pope@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Fill out timesheets, follow financial policies, maintain important extension scheduled dates, handle mail and postage, publish online materials, print materials, answer incoming calls, greet the public and assist them to the correct agent needed, answer any questions in person or on the phone, help the agents with any upcoming newsletters, mailings, or online materials

Diana Rashash
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Water Quality/Waste Management
Phone: (910) 455-5873
Email: diana_rashash@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Water and wastewater issues of all types: stormwater, aquatic weed ID & control, water quality & quantity, septic systems, animal waste, land application of wastewater, environment & sustainability, climate, etc.

Margaret Ross
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Poultry
Phone: (252) 670-8254
Email: margaret_ross@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Working with commercial poultry producers to assist in writing nutrient management plans and conducting educational programming.

Ahira Sanchez
Title: Program Assistant, EFNEP for Adults
Phone: (919) 989-5380
Email: azsanche@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: As a bilingual program assistant for the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP) for Adults, Ahira collaborates with English and Spanish-speaking community-based organizations and faith-based community groups to bring nutrition and health education to Johnston County families. She focuses on adults with the goal to impact the future of families and their children. She also provides Faithful Families, an EFNEP-based curriculum that is meant to teach health education in a faith-based setting.

Chip Simmons
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Food Safety
Phone: (919) 414-5632
Email: odsimmon@ncsu.edu

Wesley Stallings
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture- Grain Crops
Phone: (910) 455-5873
Email: wcstalli@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Agriculture-Grain Crops

Debbie Stroud
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Consumer and Retail Food Safety
Phone: (919) 515-9149
Email: dlstroud@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Area Specialized Agents in Consumer and Retail Food Safety help to ensure that Family and Consumer Sciences (FCS) Agents have access to timely, evidence-based food safety information. This is accomplished by (1) working with FCS Agents in their counties, (2) developing food safety materials and (3) planning and implementing a NC Safe Plates Food Safety Info Center.

Marshall Warren
Title: Extension Agent, Agriculture - Horticulture
Phone: (919) 989-5380
Email: marshall_warren@ncsu.edu

Dan Wells
Title: Extension Agent, Agriculture - Livestock
Phone: (919) 989-5380
Email: dan_wells@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Develops educational programs in the areas of Livestock production and management as well as youth livestock programs.

Mitch Woodward
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Watersheds and Water Quality
Phone: (919) 250-1112
Email: mdwoodwa@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: NC Cooperative Extension's Goals include: - NC's natural resources and environmental quality will be protected, conserved and enhanced. - NC will have profitable, environmentally sustainable plant, animal and food systems. Protecting our environmental resources, particularly drinking water quality, is a top priority in NC. NC Cooperative Extension is a leader in teaching, researching, and accelerating the adoption of effective water quality protection practices.

IX. Contact Information

Johnston County Center
2736 NC Highway 210
Smithfield, NC 27577

Phone: (919) 989-5380
Fax: (919) 934-2698
URL: http://johnston.ces.ncsu.edu