2019 Lee County Program Impact Report

Approved: January 21, 2020

I. Executive Summary

I. Executive Summary
4-H Youth Development Overview and Impacts:

The emphasis in the 4-H Program was placed on reaching students through STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, and mathematics) based programs including embryology, natural, animal and laboratory sciences as well as through Summer STEAM activities. According to surveys, approximately 180 students increased their knowledge, interest and had positive experiences in multiple areas related to STEAM and other life sciences. Leadership development was another major focus of the 4-H program in Lee County, positively impacting 150 participants. Leadership was fostered primarily in 4-H members through their club involvement, roles as officers in these clubs, and through summer and school-based programs. Nearly 450 4-H members and county youth also participated in Public Speaking Presentations, School Enrichment, 4-H State Congress, 4-H Citizenship Focus, Winter Enrichment, Teen Retreat, Character Plus program, and Lee County Young Commissioners.

Food, Nutrition, and Healthy Lifestyle Programming Impacts:

As a result of Extension programming in 2019, 90 individuals increased their fruit and vegetable consumption. A total of 220 individuals agreed they had increased their overall level of physical activity. “Safe Plates” food safety classes were also offered, the third year this class has taken place here with 17 restaurant food handlers passing the class. The Family Consumer Science Agent also took the lead on a county-wide health and wellness taskforce, “LEEding Toward Wellness”. This coalition initiated a number of successful projects including a Healthy Resource Map. The map includes the location of local parks, sport facilities, playgrounds, walking trails, wellness centers, greenway trails, passive parks, roadside produce stands, and community gardens. 750 of these maps were distributed to the Sanford Welcome Center, Lee County Health Department, Christian United Outreach Center Food Pantry, Lee County School System, and First Health Community Health Services. The map is digitally available on the LEEding Toward Wellness web portal and was viewed 63 times in the last 3 months.

Livestock Program Impacts:

Through livestock association meetings and certification trainings, livestock programming reached a total of 325 participants in 2019. Through these meetings, training was offered on a variety of best management practices. Topics included disease and pest management practices, proper forage selection, and proper chemical use.

In addition, 22 animal producers increased knowledge of farm business management, business planning, financial management, marketing, or estate planning. 27 animal producers learned how to develop a management plan and an additional 40 producers increased knowledge of pasture/forage management practices

Field Crops and Horticulture Program Impacts:

During 2019, over 1,650 producers and homeowners benefited from N.C. Cooperative Extension in Lee County through education on best management practices, certifications, trainings, technical assistance, education, and individual site visits. Based on the information they received and the incorporation of recommended practices, clients have indicated several behavioral changes they plan to adopt or utilize more often due to knowledge gain.

Highlights of these numbers included: 575 individuals who gained knowledge or acquired skills related to vegetable/fruit gardening, 655 clients who used extension-recommended best management practices in landscapes, turf, and gardens, 144 individuals who begin home food production by starting a vegetable and/or fruit garden and 164 participants adopting composting practices.

Safety and best agricultural practices were also a point of emphasis with 41 farmers, employees or family members adopting regular use of appropriate PPE following AgriSafe or Certified Safe Farm participation and an additional 38 pesticide applicators receiving continuing education credits.

II. County Background

Lee County, located in the geographic center of the state, was formed in 1907 from parts of Moore and Chatham counties as the 98th county in North Carolina and was named for General Robert E. Lee. The city of Sanford is the county seat. Broadway is another municipality in the county. Lee County has 164,700 acres or 256.76 sq. miles in land and 2.44 square miles in water for a total of 259.2 square miles.

Lee County had an estimated population of 60,430 in 2017. The median household income was $49,272 with a per capita income of $23,613 in 2017 with a poverty rate of 14.8%. In 2017, Lee County population was categorized as 58.1% white, black (not Hispanic or Latino) 20.2% and Hispanic 19.2%. A diverse mixture of industrial manufacturing, retail sales, agriculture, and agribusiness result in a strong and stable economy. Major industries include cosmetics, pharmaceuticals, automotive components, furniture manufacturing, food processing, brick manufacturing, textiles, recycling industries, and electronic components manufacturing. Almost 38% of our county work force is employed in the manufacturing sector, 24% in the service industry, 14% in retail and wholesale trade, and 12% in government. The agriculture and agri-business sector employs 12%.

We have two traditional high schools, and one Early College, seven elementary schools, three middle schools, as well as one alternative and one exceptional school and two private schools. The public schools are currently serving over 10,000 students from pre-kindergarten to high school.

In 2012 Agriculture and Agri-business brought in $235 million to Lee County. Poultry and flue-cured tobacco are the major income producers for farmers. With over 63% of the land in the county classified as forestland, this industry generated over 20 million dollars for our landowners. The average age of our farmers is 56. The total number of farms in Lee County is 246 with over 36,081 acres in production. The average farm size is 159 acres.

Health and wellness issues are plaguing our county. Obesity trends show that over 40% of Lee county residents are considered overweight or obese. Obesity may increase the chance of developing costly chronic diseases such as type 2 diabetes, certain cancers, heart disease, and stroke. Cooperative Extension Family and Consumer Science Agent led nutrition education and healthy lifestyle programming and Expanded Foods and Nutrition Education Programming (EFNEP) can help address these issues.

Lee County has an active Advisory Council and program committees. The Council meets quarterly and has been kept informed of the North Carolina Cooperative Extension's strategic plan. The Advisory Council supports the staff working in the areas of profitable and sustainable agriculture, leadership development, workforce preparedness, and food, nutrition, and health. Suggestions were also made to work with local farmers on emerging alternative crops, and marketing and financing production for agriculture. The Lee County staff is committed to providing responsive and relevant programs and will continue to partner with other county agencies to address issues in these areas.

III. Objectives to Address the Cooperative Extension Long Range Plan

Our family and consumer sciences programs improve the well-being of individuals, families, and communities.

Our plant production programs improve production, profitability, and sustainability of the agriculture sector.

Value* Outcome Description
22Number of producers who gain skills or knowledge to increase production for local markets.
62Number of producers who improve local food marketing skills or knowledge.
38Number of pesticide applicators receiving continuing education credits
4Number of pesticide credit hours provided
60Number of crop (all plant systems) producers increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, and/or skills as related to: 1. Best management production practices (cultural, nutrient, and genetics) 2. Pest/insect, disease, weed, wildlife management 3. Financial/Farm management tools and practices (business, marketing, government policy, human resources) 4. Alternative agriculture, bioenergy, and value-added enterprises
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
30Number of producers who diversified their marketing strategies into local markets (direct, intermediated/food service, institutional).
49Number of producers (and other members of the local food supply chain) who have increased revenue
1Number of farms certified as a Certified Safe Farm
7Number of new farms (beginning farmers) selling into local markets for local consumption (in this reporting period)
1Number of farms that made safety improvements following a CSF on-farm safety review
63Number of farmers, employees or family members adopting regular use of appropriate PPE following AgriSafe or Certified Safe Farm participation
22Number of participants that have adopted farm safety practices
22Number of producers reporting reduction in fertilizer used per acre
63Number of crop (all plant systems) producers adopting best management practices, including those practices related to nutrient management, conservation, production, cultivars, pest management (weeds, diseases, insects), business management, and marketing
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Our animal production programs improve production, profitability, and sustainability of the agriculture sector.

Value* Outcome Description
22Number of animal producers who increased knowledge of farm business management, business planning, financial management, marketing, or estate planning.
27Number of animal producers who learned how to develop a management plan (i.e. grazing plan, feeding plan, drought plan, business plan, disaster plan, etc.)
40Number of producers who increased knowledge of pasture/forage management practices (field improvement, herbicide management, grazing season extension, weed control, forage quality, haylage production, nitrate testing, etc.)
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
24Number of producers who diversified their marketing strategies into local markets (direct, intermediated/food service, institutional).
24Number of producers who adopted Extension-recommended best management practices and production changes related to genetic improvement (AI, heifer/bull selection)
22Number of producers who adopted Extension-recommended best management practices and production changes related to internal parasite management (fecals, deworming)
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Our community development programs build strong and thriving communities.

Value* Outcome Description
150Number of participants who improved knowledge of local food and agricultural systems
81Number of participants who developed new jobs skills
81Number of adult participants acquiring the skills needed to serve as a volunteer
22Number of participants that increase their knowledge of disaster preparedness planning, mitigation and recovery
59Number of participants acquiring knowledge and skills to convene and lead inclusive groups
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
10000Dollar value of in-kind resources contributed by organizations or community
3Number of (eg., community and economic development, land use, disaster, etc.) new, revised or adopted plans that have begun to be implemented in communities, organizations, local governments, or businesses
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Our 4-H youth development programs grow the skills young people need to succeed in life and career.

Value* Outcome Description
27Number of teachers trained in 4-H STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) curriculum
688Number of youth (students) increasing knowledge in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math)
367Total number of female participants in STEM program
9Number of youth (students) participating in 4-H dropout prevention (student at-risk) programs
50Number of high school age youth (students) participating as members of 4-H clubs
745Number of youth increasing knowledge of life skills
56Number of children/youth who improved knowledge of local food and agricultural systems.
79Number of youth increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
35Number of youth demonstrating increased knowledge of natural resources and environmental issues
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
1Number of teachers using 4-H STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) curriculum in their classrooms
127Number of youth (students) gaining career / employability skills
57Number of youth (students) gaining entrepreneurship skills
162Number of youth using effective life skills
17Number of youth willing to participate in conservation actions
2Number of youth volunteers serving in new or expanded roles within Extension
1Number of youth volunteers serving in new or expanded roles beyond Extension, including community boards and task forces
9Number of youth assuming new/expanded leadership roles in the community
47Number of youth increasing their fruit and vegetable consumption
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Our natural resource and environmental programs conserve our precious natural resources and maintain a clean and healthy environment.

Our consumer horticulture programs teach families and communities about environmentally friendly methods for gardening and controlling pests.

Value* Outcome Description
575Number of individuals who gain knowledge or acquire skills related to vegetable/fruit gardening
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
23Number of individuals who grow food in community gardens.
144Number of individuals who begin home food production by starting a vegetable and/or fruit garden
655Number of participants who use extension-recommended best management practices in landscapes, turf, and gardens, including pest (insect, weed, disease, wildlife) and soil management
575Number of participants selecting appropriate landscape plants (adapted, drought tolerant, appropriate size, etc.)
655Number of participants growing food for home consumption
164Number of participants adopting composting
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Our food safety and nutrition programs create a safer and more sustainable food supply and improve the health and nutrition of individuals, families, and our communities.

Value* Outcome Description
248Number of participants who increase their knowledge of safe home food handling, preservation, or preparation practices
269Number of food handlers who increase their knowledge and skills in safe food handling practices
267Number of individuals who learn how to prepare local foods, including through use of home food preservation techniques.
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
229Number of participants developing food safety plans
90Number of adults increasing their fruit and vegetables consumption
220Number of participants increasing their physical activity
232Number of participants who consume less sodium in their diet
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

IV. Number of Contacts Made by Extension

Type of ContactNumber
Face-to-face* 7,027
Non face-to-face** 1,019,881
Total by Extension staff in 2019 1,026,908
* Face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make directly with individuals through one-on-one visits, meetings, and other activities where staff members work directly with individuals.
** Non face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make indirectly with individuals by telephone, email, newsletters, news articles, radio, television, and other means.

V. Designated Grants Received by Extension

Type of GrantAmount
Contracts/Grants $4,000.00
Gifts/Donations $8,309.00
In-Kind Grants/Donations $0.00
United Way/Foundations $1,500.00
User Fees $2,970.00
Total $16,779.00

VI. Volunteer Involvement in Extension Programs

Number of Volunteers* Number of Volunteer Hours Known client contacts by volunteers Dollar Value at 25.43
4-H 226 602 970 $ 15,309.00
Advisory Leadership System 25 30 54 $ 763.00
Extension Community Association 42 5169 743 $ 131,448.00
Extension Master Gardener 189 929 533 $ 23,624.00
Extension Master Food Volunteers 9 163 528 $ 4,145.00
Other: Agriculture 10 12 22 $ 305.00
Other: Food & Nutrition 35 96 230 $ 2,441.00
Total: 536 7001 3080 $ 178,035.00
* The number of volunteers reflects the overall number of volunteers for multiple events.

VII. Membership of Advisory Leadership System

Advisory Council
Jim Foster
Alan Cox
John Cameron
Nancy Gust
Avron Upchurch
Wayne Watson
Grace Lawrence
Mark Luellen
Bernie Smith
Amy Dalrymple
Mildred Smith
Susan Alexander
Crystal McIver
Ryan Faulk
Gary Hart
Agricultural Advisory Board
AK Griffin
Cecil Cameron
Donald Nicholson
George Gilliam
Molly Whitaker
Tom Haislip
Wayne Watson
Ed Angel


Forestry Program Advisory Committee
Mark Luellen
Jeremy Isom
Bud Taylor
Charles Oldham
Martha Oldham
4-H Program Advisory Committee
Peggy Mann
Carole Stevens
Mary Hawley Oates
Larry Aiken
David Caplan
Patrick Kelly
Cindy Howenstein
Layne Baker
Chris Kelly
Kristy Airey
Daniel Simmons
Zac West
Morgan Barbour
Dustin Kornegay
Master Gardener Volunteer Advisory Committee
Pat Banville
Avron Upchurch
Ann Kightlinger
Anna Culler
Georgianna Kiggins
Donna Frangipane
4-H Volunteer Leaders Advisory Committee
Brandon Steger
Regina Fox
Myrna Rodriguez
Pam Kerley
Tammy Steger
Petra Wooten
Carol Smith
Karen Mersinger
LJ Carroll
ECA Leadership Team
Mildred Smith
Becky Poole
Roland Armstrong
Sharon Raschke
Georgia Garner
Edna Foushee
Sylvia Churchwell
Valerie Johnson
Peggy Abshear
Rosemary Gregurich
Sondra Burford
Irene Smith
Carol Cox
Anna Simmons

VIII. Staff Membership

Bill Stone
Title: County Extension Director
Phone: (919) 775-5624
Email: bill_stone@ncsu.edu

Alyssa Anderson
Title: Extension Agent, Family and Consumer Sciences - Nutrition
Phone: (919) 775-5624
Email: alyssa_anderson@ncsu.edu

Jenny Carleo
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Grain Crops
Phone: (704) 873-0507
Email: jscarleo@ncsu.edu

Minda Daughtry
Title: Extension Agent, Agriculture - Horticulture
Phone: (919) 775-5624
Email: minda_daughtry@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Commercial Horticulture: Small Fruits, Tree Fruits, Vegetables Consumer Horticulture Community Gardening Master Gardener Volunteers

Marti Day
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Dairy
Phone: (919) 542-8202
Email: marti_day@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Responsible for educational programs for dairy farmers, youth with an interest in dairy projects and the general public with an interest in dairy foods and the dairy industry.

Rhonda Gaster
Title: County Extension Administrative Assistant
Phone: (919) 775-5624
Email: rhonda_gaster@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Works on all administrative aspects including but not limited to the following: Prepares and monitors all administrative correspondence, reports (budget, travel, leave, mail etc.) Maintains personnel files and confidential information. Updates staff on personnel policy changes. Works closely with CED in coordinating events, meetings, agenda, etc. Analyze monthly & daily financial reports relative to county budget. Prepare and process invoices for payment Assist CED in annual County Extension budget. Maintains 4 in-house checking accounts and makes quarterly reports. Maintain the center's webpage. Assist all agents with projects/programs. Maintain and monitors office supplies and publications. Manages calendar/reservations for events held in the auditorium. Reports to the County's General Services repairs needed at the McSwain Center. Serves on the Lee County Safety Committee. Maintains good relationship with Finance and General Services offices.

Richard Goforth
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Poultry
Phone: (910) 893-7530
Email: richard_goforth@ncsu.edu

Marissa Herchler
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Animal Food Safety (FSMA Programs)
Phone: (919) 515-5396
Email: marissa_herchler@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Marissa is an Area Specialized Agent for animal food safety, with emphasis on the new Food Safety Modernization Act rules, as they apply to feed mills in North Carolina. Please contact Marissa with any FSMA related questions, or PCQI training inquiries.

Stacey Jones
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Commercial Nursery and Greenhouse
Phone: (704) 920-3310
Email: stacey_jones@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: I work with commercial greenhouses and nurseries to help them with growing related issues. These issues range from pests (insect, disease, and weeds), substrates, nutrition, and other miscellaneous topics.

Peggie Lewis Joyce
Title: Area 4-H Agent - Central Region
Phone: (336) 242-2080
Email: peggie_lewis@ncsu.edu

Pam Kerley
Title: 4-H Program Assistant
Phone: (919) 775-5624
Email: pkerley@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Support the 4-H agent, club communication and management, teen council, coordinate/attend/chaperone 4-H trips, STEM programming, program marketing, public speaking program, project record book program, awards collection and recognition program,

Colby Lambert
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Forestry
Phone: (910) 814-6041
Email: colby_lambert@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provides educational opportunities and technical support to forest landowners, agents, and forest industry in eastern North Carolina.

Sarah Perry
Title: Program Assistant - EFNEP
Phone: (919) 775-5624
Email: saperry3@ncsu.edu

Ashley Robbins
Title: Area Specialized Agent - Dairy
Phone: (919) 542-8203
Email: ashley_robbins@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Marti Day and I are the Area Specialized Dairy Agents - the county-based arm of the Cooperative Extension Dairy Team. We are out here in the counties to help you set and reach your farm, family and business goals. We have collaborative expertise in the areas of Waste Management, Udder Health, Cow Comfort, Nutrition and Forage Management with specialties in (Ashley)Reproduction, Records Management, Animal Health and (Marti)Alternative Markets, Organic Dairy, Grazing Management, and On-farm Processing. We hope to provide comprehensive educational programs for our farmers, consumers and youth for every county across the state. We are here for you by phone, email or text and look forward to working with you!

Chip Simmons
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Food Safety
Phone: (919) 414-5632
Email: odsimmon@ncsu.edu

Debbie Stroud
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Consumer and Retail Food Safety
Phone: (919) 515-9149
Email: dlstroud@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Area Specialized Agents in Consumer and Retail Food Safety help to ensure that Family and Consumer Sciences (FCS) Agents have access to timely, evidence-based food safety information. This is accomplished by (1) working with FCS Agents in their counties, (2) developing food safety materials and (3) planning and implementing a NC Safe Plates Food Safety Info Center.

Allan Thornton
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Commercial Vegetables and Fruits
Phone: (910) 592-7161
Email: allan_thornton@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Vegetable Extension Specialist. Conducts Extension and applied research programs for commercial vegetable and fruit growers and agents in eastern North Carolina.

Mitch Williams
Title: Extension Agent, Agriculture - Field Crops, Livestock, Pesticide Coordinator
Phone: (919) 775-5624
Email: mkwilli2@ncsu.edu

Mitch Woodward
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Watersheds and Water Quality
Phone: (919) 414-3873
Email: mdwoodwa@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: NC Cooperative Extension's Goals include: - NC's natural resources and environmental quality will be protected, conserved and enhanced. - NC will have profitable, environmentally sustainable plant, animal and food systems. Protecting our environmental resources, particularly drinking water quality, is a top priority in NC. NC Cooperative Extension is a leader in teaching, researching, and accelerating the adoption of effective water quality protection practices.

IX. Contact Information

Lee County Center
2420 Tramway Rd
Sanford, NC 27332

Phone: (919) 775-5624
Fax: (919) 775-1302
URL: http://lee.ces.ncsu.edu