2018 Madison County Program Impact Report

Approved: January 22, 2019

I. Executive Summary

In 2018 a total of 225 educational activities and hundreds site visits resulted in over 20,000 individual client contacts made by Madison County Extension staff and the volunteers they trained. A total of $271,522.00 in grants and other fund development activities were managed by the Extension Center and over $62,000 in volunteer services were reported by program activities involving 339 volunteers.

Specific programs and their impacts include:

4-H School To Career
Madison County 4-H offers numerous school enrichment program opportunities to teachers/students in public schools as well as a club program and summer day camps. In 2018, 180 students gained knowledge in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math); a total of 65 students gained career/employability skills. Teaching youth to understand where their food comes from is accomplished through programs focused on on 2nd and 3rd grade. All 2nd graders participate in the 4-H Embryology program and 3rd graders learn how to grow a garden through a program called Soil Solutions. A total of 11 teachers were trained as 4-H Volunteers and used these 4-H curricula in their classroom.

Local Food
225 farmers were involved in selling local farm products or services in direct market systems i.e. tailgate markets, on farm sales, restaurants and local distributors, CSA's etc.. Extension initiatives that contribute to this impact include: the Extension value added center, Madison Family Farms, organic amendment program, various presentations, on farm heirloom tomato trial, and one-on-one farmer interaction. Thirty-Five new farmers were assisted throughout the year in starting a farming business. 190 school age students were engaged with the direct growing of their own food through school gardens managed by NC Cooperative Extension. Additionally, 2500 lbs of venison was donated to local food banks.

Profitable and Sustainable Plant Production Systems
This program area captures an array of programming activities that impacted the farming industry in Madison County. An overall economic impact of over $303,000 was achieved through a number of programs including: Landscape Pesticide Education, Winter Vegetable Conference, Beekeeping, Commercial production of vegetables, nursery, timber, Christmas tree test plots, Wildlife management, and greenhouse production. The WNC Ag. Options program funneled $229,000 to farmers in WNC to offset risks as they tried alternative farm enterprises.

Profitable and Sustainable Animal Systems
Animal Agriculture dominates much of Madison County's landscape. The majority of the farmers and the majority of the agricultural land in this county is devoted to some sort of livestock production or forages to feed those livestock. Over 320 livestock producers are actively farming showing $85,000 in net income gained because of practices supported by NC Cooperative Extension.

Safety and Security of our Food and Farm Systems
Madison County Extension is home to an “inspected” value added kitchen. Workshops were conducted on: food safety 101, kitchen policies and procedures, NCDA regulatory requirements, a facility tour and an overview of the many unique equipment items (grain grinder, commercial dehydrators to name just a few). In 2018, 38 individuals were trained in the food safety component of this program allowing them to utilize the value added kitchen. Twenty-five percent of those individuals use the kitchen commercially. Pesticide education is a focused program designed to train farmers how to handle pesticides safely with 121 farmers receiving pesticide education in 2018.

Volunteerism
Cooperative Extension offers several venues for volunteer service: Advisory Councils, On farm tests, Master Gardener Volunteers, 4-H, Master Food Volunteer Program, and others. In 2018 a total of 339 volunteers contributed over 2500 hours of volunteer service to the citizens of Madison County with a value of $62.000. These volunteers expanded Cooperative Extension's outreach by sharing educational information to 4689 additional known clients in 2018. Through the 4-H program 110 adults and several youth received specialized volunteer training.


Community Development
Developing community is a result of many of Extension’s initiatives and partnerships. Included in these activities are: The seven Madison County Community Clubs. The Appalachian Barn Alliance and the Madison County Fair. 38 community members increased knowledge and skills in community development. Additionally, there are food insecurity programs that Extension assisted resulting in tons of food being supplied to needy families in Madison County.

Healthy Eating, Physical Activity and Chronic Disease Risk Reduction
Through Family and Consumer Science efforts 15 adults and 27 youth increased their consumption of fruits and vegetables in 2018. Seven individuals reported an increase in their physical activity.

Urban and Consumer Agriculture
This program includes the responsive actions of Cooperative Extension to the consumer horticulture clients in the county. Phone calls, walk ins, and site visits provide a valuable service to the residents of the county contributing to their quality of life and saving them money they would have had to spend if they sought this advise from a private company. The Master Gardener Volunteer program provided intensive training resulting in significant volunteer hours contributed to the work of NC Cooperative Extension.

Leadership Development
A total of 17 adults and 14 youth increased their skill set as well as their roles in leadership. Many of which, assumed roles within the community.

Parenting and Caregiver Skills
Forty-five individuals demonstrated the use of goal setting, stress management, and healthier relationships as a result of family educational programming. An additional 18 individuals received continuing education credits for workshops conducted.

II. County Background

Madison County has a population of roughly 21,000. Hard working people with close knit families and communities are the backbone of this county. Rural and primarily agrarian, this county boasts over 1000 active small and medium size farms. The farming profile is transitioning from a century long history of wholesale production and now has adopted a direct market approach to sales of farm products. This fundamental change increases the need for education on marketing, distribution, packaging, processing and food safety as well as a campaign to educate the local consumer. Cooperative Extension is poised to provide educational programming that address many aspects of this transitioning food culture. This focus on local food has implications that affect every program area of Extension including: Youth, Families, Communities and Farmers.

Three small towns make up the urban climate: Mars Hill, Marshall and Hot Springs. The largest of these towns is populated with just over 1000. Half the County's working population leave the county for employment while many of those that remain own small businesses which adds to the rural, wholesome flavor of the county.

One county High School and one Middle School are supported by three elementary schools located in each of the county’s three towns. Extension programming in all of these schools is essential to the growth of our youth. A focus on teaching life skills and developing leaders for the future is evident in this Plan of Work.

The following is a list of primary objectives that will direct the Madison County Extension Center in 2018:

1) Profitable and Sustainable Plant Production Systems
2) Profitable and Sustainable Animal Production Systems
3) Local Food Systems
4) Safety and Security of our Food and Farm Systems
5) Leadership Development
6) Volunteer Readiness
7) Community Development
8) School to Career (Youth and Adults)
9) Urban and Consumer Agriculture
10) Healthy Eating, Physical Activity and Chronic Disease Risk Reduction

Educational programs within this document will focus on these issues and will match statewide objectives that focus on three strategic priorities set forth in Cooperative Extension’s Strategic Planning initiative:
Agriculture, Food, and 4-H Youth Development.

III. Objectives to Address the Cooperative Extension Long Range Plan

North Carolina's plant production systems will become more profitable and sustainable.

Value* Outcome Description
325Number of crop (all plant systems) producers increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, and/or skills as related to: 1. Best management production practices (cultural, nutrient, and genetics) 2. Pest/insect, disease, weed, wildlife management 3. Financial/Farm management tools and practices (business, marketing, government policy, human resources) 4. Alternative agriculture, bioenergy, and value-added enterprises
1Number of Extension initiated and controlled County demonstration test sites (new required for GLF/PSI reporting)
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
37Number of crop (all plant systems) producers adopting best management practices, including those practices related to nutrient management, conservation, production, cultivars, pest management (weeds, diseases, insects), business management, and marketing
303200Net income gains realized by the adoption of best management practices, including those practices related to nutrient management, conservation, production, cultivars, pest management (weeds, diseases, insects), business management, and marketing
26Number of producers reporting increased dollar returns per acre or reduced costs per acre
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

North Carolina's animal production systems will become more profitable and sustainable.

Value* Outcome Description
320Number of animal producers increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, and/or skills as related to: 1. Best management production practices (cultural, nutrient, and genetics) 2. Pest/insect, disease, weed, wildlife management 3. Financial/Farm management tools and practices (business, marketing, government policy, human resources) 4. Alternative agriculture, bioenergy, and value-added enterprises
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
40Number of animal producers adopting Extension-recommended best management practices, including those practices related to husbandry, improved planning, marketing, and financial practices
85000Net income gains by producers adopting Extension-recommended best management practices, including those practices related to husbandry, improved planning, marketing, and financial practices
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Producers will increase sales of food locally to more agriculturally aware consumers through market development, producer and consumer education, and new farmer and infrastructure support.

Value* Outcome Description
120Number of producers who gain skills or knowledge to increase production for local markets.
85Number of children/youth who improved knowledge of local food and agricultural systems.
8Number of individuals who gain knowledge or acquire skills related to vegetable/fruit gardening, and if also reporting under Urban and Consumer Agriculture Objective, divide up the reported number appropriately between the two objectives to avoid duplication.
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
12Number of new and existing access points for consumers that expand or improve their offering of local fruits and vegetables. Access points include farmers markets, retail stores, school food programs, community gardens, institutions other than schools (e.g. hospitals, universities, etc.), and other systems/access points not noted (e.g. restaurants, etc.).
225Number of producers selling their agricultural products to local markets (direct, intermediated/food service, institutional) for consumption in NC.
35Number of producers who diversified their marketing strategies into local markets (direct, intermediated/food service, institutional).
35Number of new farms (beginning farmers) selling into local markets for local consumption (in this reporting period).
2500Number of pounds of local foods donated for consumption by vulnerable populations.
190Number of youth who grow food in school gardens.
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Agricultural producers, workers, food handlers and consumers will adopt safer food and agricultural production, handling, and distribution practices that reduce workplace and home injuries/illnesses, enhance food security, and increase the quality and safety of food that North Carolinians prepare and consume.

Value* Outcome Description
121Number of commercial/public operators trained
14Number of pesticide application credit hours provided
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Individuals and groups will acquire leadership and decision making capacities needed to guide and actively participate in local and state organizations.

Value* Outcome Description
17Number of adults increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
2Number of adults assuming new/expanded leadership roles in the community
16Number of youth increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
1Number of youth assuming new/expanded leadership roles in the community
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Youth and adults will address community issues and/or challenges through volunteerism.

Value* Outcome Description
110Number of adult participants acquiring the skills needed to serve as a volunteer
3Number of youth participants reporting aspirations to serve in new or expanded volunteer roles in community
22Number of adult participants reporting aspirations to serve in new or expanded volunteer roles in community
56Number of hours adult volunteer training conducted
9Number of hours youth volunteer training conducted
26Number new volunteers recruited
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
20Increased number of hours contributed by trained youth volunteers
2222Increased number of hours contributed by trained adult volunteers
9Number of youth volunteers serving in new or expanded roles within Extension
32Number of adult volunteers serving in new or expanded roles within Extension
22Number of youth volunteers serving in new or expanded roles beyond Extension, including community boards and task forces
16Number of adult volunteers serving in new or expanded roles beyond Extension, including community boards and task forces
5Number of youth volunteers recruiting and/or training new volunteers
3Number of adult volunteers recruiting and/or training new volunteers
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Community members, organizations and local government will engage in collaborative dialog and decision-making to build economically, socially and environmentally resilient communities. This will be done through inclusive engagement, partnership building, and/or community planning.

Value* Outcome Description
38Number of participants increasing knowledge and skills in convening and leading inclusive, representative groups (including limited resources, new resident, or immigrant groups) for evidence based community development
12Number of participants who increased their awareness, knowledge or skill in business related topics (e.g., management, product development, marketing, business structure options, business law and/or liability)
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
4Number of businesses created, retained, or expanded due to Extension’s community and economic development programming
12000Dollar value of in-kind resources (funding, in-kind service or volunteers) contributed to Projects or Programs in which Extension was critically involved by an organization or community to support community or economic development work
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Futures that Work: School to Career Pathways

Value* Outcome Description
11Number of teachers trained in 4-H STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) curriculum
180Number of youth (students) increasing knowledge in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math)
100Total number of female participants in STEM program
7Number of high school age youth (students) participating as members of 4-H clubs
65Number of youth (students) increasing knowledge of career/employability skills
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
11Number of teachers using 4-H STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) curriculum in their classrooms
180Number of youth (students) gaining knowledge in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math)
100Number of youth (students) gaining career / employability skills
3Number of adults gaining career / employability skills
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Consumers and communities will enhance the value of plants, animals, and landscapes while conserving valuable natural resources and protecting the environment.

Value* Outcome Description
65Number of participants improving knowledge, attitude, skills and aspirations regarding gardening and landscape practices including plant selection and placement, turfgrass management, soil management, growing food, water conservation and water quality preservation, storm water and erosion management, green waste management, pest and wildlife management
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
65Number of participants who use extension-recommended best management practices in landscapes, turf, and gardens, including pest (insect, weed, disease) management, fertility management, water conservation, water quality preservation and pruning techniques
5Number of participants growing food for home consumption
1000Value of produce grown for home consumption
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Youth and adult program participants will make healthy food choices, achieve the recommended amount of physical activity and reduce risk factors for chronic diseases.

Value* Impact Description
15Number of adults increasing their fruit and vegetables consumption
27Number of youth increasing their fruit and vegetable consumption
7Number of participants increasing their physical activity
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

IV. Number of Contacts Made by Extension

Type of ContactNumber
Face-to-face* 10,294
Non face-to-face** 9,755
Total by Extension staff in 2018 20,049
* Face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make directly with individuals through one-on-one visits, meetings, and other activities where staff members work directly with individuals.
** Non face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make indirectly with individuals by telephone, email, newsletters, news articles, radio, television, and other means.

V. Designated Grants Received by Extension

Type of GrantAmount
Contracts/Grants $253,200.00
Gifts/Donations $5,616.00
In-Kind Grants/Donations $0.00
United Way/Foundations $100.00
User Fees $12,606.33
Total $271,522.33

VI. Volunteer Involvement in Extension Programs

Number of Volunteers* Number of Volunteer Hours Known client contacts by volunteers Dollar Value at 25.43
4-H: 182 1,451 2,133 $ 36,899.00
Advisory Leadership System: 19 47 65 $ 1,195.00
Extension Community Association: 23 39 74 $ 992.00
Extension Master Gardener: 9 258 20 $ 6,561.00
Other: 106 731 2,397 $ 18,589.00
Total: 339 2526 4689 $ 64,236.00
* The number of volunteers reflects the overall number of volunteers for multiple events.

VII. Membership of Advisory Leadership System

Madison County Extension Advisory Council
Jackie Burkhardt
Meg Chamberlain
Melissa Harwin
Knowledge Burkhardt
Pat Jenkins
Tommy Justice
Francis Ramsey
Veda Davis
David Wyatt
Caroline Davis
Rob Kraft
Melanie Kraft
Grainger Caudle
Laura Ponder
Kristen Vann
Deana Stephens
June Trevor
4-H Advisory Council Members
Laura Ponder
Caroline Douglass
Jacki Burkhardt
Knowledge Burkhardt
Donna Yost
Dorothy Crowell


Foods and Nutrition/ Health/ Food Safety Program Committee
Deana Stephens
Sharon Norton
Pat Jenkins
Laura Downing

Farmland Preservation
Harold Hunter
Ricky Reeves
David Wyatt
Tyler Ross
Brandon Young
Charles Zink
Maurice McAlister
Alternative Ag. Program Committee
Aubrey Raper
Melissa Harwin
Luther Ball
Rodney Webb
4-H School Enrichment
Kristen Vann
Caroline Davis
Lindsay Montgomery
Jennifer McHone
Nicole Norton
Waynette Wilson
Family and Consumer Sciences Sub ALS
Jodi Brazil
Deana Stephens
Barbara Stone
Melissa Harwin
Lynn Bowles
Amy Rabb
Julie Yang
Agriculture Agency committee
Tyler Ross
Chad Ayers
Brandon Young
Jess Hocz
Molly Nicholi
Charlie Zink
Chris Leek
Bill Glenn
Spencer Blevins
Livestock/Forage/Row Crop committee
Harold Hunter
Shannon Roberts
Steve Robertson
Robin Reeves-Singleton
Commercial Horticulture committee
Michael Boone
Carson King
Edward Jones
Michael Coates

VIII. Staff Membership

Ross Young
Title: County Extension Director
Phone: (828) 649-2411
Email: ross_young@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: 20% Administration 20% Comercial Ag. Production 20% Facilities management 20% 4-H 20% Community Development

Elizabeth Ayers
Title: Extension Agent, Agriculture
Phone: (828) 649-2411
Email: elizabeth_ayers@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Agriculture Extension Agent

Cathy Brackins
Title: County 4-H Program Assistant
Phone: (828) 206-0351
Email: Cathy_Brackins@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: 4-H Program assistant and 10 hours support staff.

Rebecca Bradley
Title: Extension Agent, Agriculture - Livestock, Agronomy and Consumer Horticulture
Phone: (828) 649-2411
Email: rebecca_bradley@ncsu.edu

Magen Caldwell-Woody
Title: County Extension Administrative Assistant
Phone: (828) 649-2411
Email: magen_caldwell@ncsu.edu

April Dillon
Title: Area Extension Agent, 4-H Youth Development
Phone: (704) 482-4365
Email: april_dillon@ncsu.edu

Sue Estridge
Title: Area Agent, Family and Consumer Sciences
Phone: (828) 649-2411
Email: sue_estridge@ncsu.edu

Lauren Greene
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Poultry
Phone: (336) 651-7347
Email: lauren_greene@ncsu.edu

Marissa Herchler
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Animal Food Safety (FSMA Programs)
Phone: (919) 515-5396
Email: marissa_herchler@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Marissa is an Area Specialized Agent for animal food safety, with emphasis on the new Food Safety Modernization Act rules, as they apply to feed mills in North Carolina. Please contact Marissa with any FSMA related questions, or PCQI training inquiries.

Bill Lord
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Water Resources
Phone: (919) 496-3344
Email: william_lord@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Water quality education and technical assistance

Craig Mauney
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Commercial Vegetables and Fruits
Phone: (828) 684-3562
Email: craig_mauney@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provides educational opportunities, training and technical support to commercial fruit and vegetable growers, agents, and industry in Western NC.

Currey Nobles
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Food Safety
Phone: (919) 515-9520
Email: canobles@ncsu.edu

Elena Rogers
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Food Safety - Fresh Produce Western NC
Phone: (828) 352-2519
Email: elena_rogers@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provide educational programs, training and technical support focusing on fresh produce safety to Agents and growers in Western NC.

Debbie Stroud
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Consumer and Retail Food Safety
Phone: (919) 515-9149
Email: dlstroud@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Area Specialized Agents in Consumer and Retail Food Safety help to ensure that Family and Consumer Sciences (FCS) Agents have access to timely, evidence-based food safety information. This is accomplished by (1) working with FCS Agents in their counties, (2) developing food safety materials and (3) planning and implementing a NC Safe Plates Food Safety Info Center.

Amanda Taylor
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Nursery and Greenhouse, Western Region
Phone: (828) 475-2915
Email: amanda_jo_taylor@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provides programming to commercial nursery and greenhouse producers in Alexander, Alleghany, Ashe, Avery, Buncombe, Burke, Caldwell, Catawba, Cherokee, Clay, Cleveland, Gaston, Graham, Haywood, Henderson, Jackson, Lincoln, Macon, Madison, McDowell, Mitchell, Polk, Rutherford, Swain, Transylvania, Watauga, Wilkes, and Yancey Counties.

Skip Thompson
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Aquaculture
Phone: (828) 456-3575
Email: Skip_Thompson@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provide educational opportunities and technical support to the trout and carp aquaculture industries in 42 counties and the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians (EBCI) in western North Carolina. Fish health, production management, and waste management educational programs will assist trout farmers, fee-fishing pond managers, carp ponds and trout fingerling producers with the management and sustainability of their facilities.

Mitch Woodward
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Watersheds and Water Quality
Phone: (919) 250-1112
Email: mdwoodwa@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: NC Cooperative Extension's Goals include: - NC's natural resources and environmental quality will be protected, conserved and enhanced. - NC will have profitable, environmentally sustainable plant, animal and food systems. Protecting our environmental resources, particularly drinking water quality, is a top priority in NC. NC Cooperative Extension is a leader in teaching, researching, and accelerating the adoption of effective water quality protection practices.

IX. Contact Information

Madison County Center
258 Carolina Ln
Marshall, NC 28753

Phone: (828) 649-2411
Fax: (828) 649-2020
URL: http://madison.ces.ncsu.edu