2018 Martin County Program Impact Report

Approved: February 2, 2019

I. Executive Summary

In 2018 Martin County Cooperative Extension provided a variety of unbiased, research-based programming efforts to benefit the land, economy, and lives of Martin County residents. Through this programming Extension staff provided 20,579 face-to-face educational contacts. Martin County Extension volunteers helped to increase the impact of programs donating 636 volunteer hours in 2018 valued at over $15,703. In addition to the great programs offered, Extension professionals also spent time seeking grants & fundraising to support programs which totaled over $14,300.

Agriculture and the Environment

Agriculture Extension programming continued support of new opportunities in commercial hemp production in eastern NC due to a change in state regulations. Martin County boasted the largest numbers of licensed hemp growers in the state in 2018. Extension met this challenge assisting new producers with the many issues associated with this new crop. Extension served to educate producers, and help identify issues and opportunities for future improvements for this new crop. In addition, Extension has helped to inform university research on this new crop and its diverse cropping systems. Plasticulture use continued to gain momentum in 2018 with the addition of an NC A&T provided plastic laying machine. This equipment and programming was used to improve impacts for hemp, collard greens, and strawberry producers, in addition to others.

2018 was a difficult year for farmers in Martin County, with record setting rainfall and hurricane damage. Extension rose to the occasion helping to identify and develop management plans for the increased disease in crops. Identifying and improving a variety of pest and disease issues in corn, cotton, soybeans, tobacco, and peanuts among other major commodity crops. With the addition of a full-time crops agent, agriculture programs where significantly expanded during 2018 offering additional sites and face to face programs for all programming throughout the year. This allowed the agriculture program to expand its reach to a variety of underserved audiences.

Horticulture and livestock programs, including workshops and one-on-one problem solving, were substantially expanded in 2018 with the addition of new staff. These programs are gaining momentum and new partnerships in the county with Martin Community College and the Library. Freeze damage and excess moisture had a large negative impact on ornamental plants in 2018, giving Extension the opportunity to address this issue and provide solutions for over 40 homeowners.

The Martin County Farmer's Market also produced successes in 2018, increasing market participation with an average of 150 customers weekly, increasing the number of vendors, and receiving county appropriations to maintain the farmer's market manager position. The market continues to make strides towards improving access to local healthy food choices.

Food & Families

Family and Consumer Science programming focused on healthy eating and lifestyles in 2018. Programming included programming for adults like the Cook Smart, Eat Smart program. This program had several participants reporting that they prepared more healthy meals at home, and 100% of participants feeling more comfortable preparing healthy meals in their home.

2018 was a big year for EFNEP programming in Martin County reaching over 600 youth participants. Students were observed talking to their parents about healthy eating, and serving sizes. Participants showed improvement in fruit consumption, understanding serving sizes, and increasing the variety of foods consumed.

4-H Youth Development

Partnerships with the new Martin County Boys and Girls Clubs expanded 4-H programming in minority audiences this year. Livestock programs continued to grow in 2018 with 46 participants in the 2018 Livestock Show and Sale, this program helped to improve responsibility and record keeping for participating youth. In addition, summer programming was improved through the addition of a teen leadership program. The 4-H program reached over 1800 youth in 2018 and is looking to expand even more in 2019 in order to further Extension's reach into underserved and minority communities.

Major initiatives for 2019 were identified through a local needs assessment and by input from the existing advisory leadership council to ensure the future successes of Extension in its goal of improving lives.

II. County Background

Martin County is a northeastern county in North Carolina with access to both rural living and proximity to many modern amenities and more urban areas. Martin County has a population of 23,199 people and a land area of 461 square miles, including 127,187 acres of land in farms, 87,759 acres of which is harvested cropland. The racial make-up of the county is 55% white, 42.7% black, and 3.8% hispanic. The population of the county has steadily declined in recent years, and is projected to continue to decline directly affecting population-based revenues and raising a variety of community issues including school consolidation. The median family income is $34,957 and 22.5% of citizens are living below the poverty level. High school drop out rates, unemployment, housing, crime, and a variety of other social issues are ongoing priorities of the county. Growth in the county will depend largely on how these issues are addressed and helping to improve the employable skills of citizens. Martin County is a Tier 1 County indicating it is one of the most distressed communities in the state.

Agriculture is the major industry in the county with a market value of products sold totaling over $100 million. Major agriculture commodities include:

Peanuts: 9,706 acres (#1 in production for NC)
Cotton: 46,306 acres (#3 in production for NC)
Soybeans: 16,301 acres
Wheat: 7,510 acres
Tobacco: Valued at $26,140,000 Annually (#9 in production for NC)

Economic sustainability is of growing concern in Martin County. This issue was demonstrated in 2017 with the loss of Parkdale Mills, a major employer and economic driver in the community. This loss continues to affect not only the families of employees, but the local economy, tax-base, and county and town revenue. The economic stability of farm families is also an urgent need in the changing economic environment of farming. With the loss of government programs for tobacco and peanuts causing greater instability for farm families, all our resources - from tried and true production practices to alternative use of crops for renewable fuel feed stocks; to youth support systems and teaching youth life skills; to making every effort at educating families in healthy lifestyles and behavior will all be marshaled to meet this need in this agriculture based county.

Youth often face heavy peer pressure to take part in harmful or risky behavior. Quite often the child is not emotionally equipped to make good choices. Due to a variety of factors including health issues, high youth poverty rates, and low parental supervision, Martin County has a significant need for youth programming especially in the areas of leadership, career skill building, science and technology, and healthy lifestyles. The success of these youth as they enter adulthood will hinge on their success in these areas.

Chronic disease, such as heart disease and diabetes, impose a particularly heavy burden on North Carolinians and Martin County citizens. Diet and lifestyle changes can help prevent serious complications related to these chronic diseases.

Extension staff members will work to conduct a comprehensive investigation of demographic changes, data, trends, and issues to determine the direction and focus for future Extension programming in the coming years. Staff plans will seek to address the identified areas.

Collaboration and networking with other agencies will be strengthened to address community opportunities, problems, and issues in a holistic way.

This data was sourced from the Martin County 2017-18 Financial Report, the United States Census Bureau, and the NCAGR Census of Agriculture.

III. Objectives to Address the Cooperative Extension Long Range Plan

North Carolina's plant production systems will become more profitable and sustainable.

Value* Outcome Description
175Number of crop (all plant systems) producers increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, and/or skills as related to: 1. Best management production practices (cultural, nutrient, and genetics) 2. Pest/insect, disease, weed, wildlife management 3. Financial/Farm management tools and practices (business, marketing, government policy, human resources) 4. Alternative agriculture, bioenergy, and value-added enterprises
4Number of Extension initiated and controlled County demonstration test sites (new required for GLF/PSI reporting)
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
142Number of crop (all plant systems) producers adopting best management practices, including those practices related to nutrient management, conservation, production, cultivars, pest management (weeds, diseases, insects), business management, and marketing
517800Net income gains realized by the adoption of best management practices, including those practices related to nutrient management, conservation, production, cultivars, pest management (weeds, diseases, insects), business management, and marketing
121Number of producers reporting increased dollar returns per acre or reduced costs per acre
28Number of producers reporting reduction in fertilizer used per acre
20725Number of acres in conservation tillage or other Best Management Practice
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

North Carolina's animal production systems will become more profitable and sustainable.

Value* Outcome Description
31Number of animal producers increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, and/or skills as related to: 1. Best management production practices (cultural, nutrient, and genetics) 2. Pest/insect, disease, weed, wildlife management 3. Financial/Farm management tools and practices (business, marketing, government policy, human resources) 4. Alternative agriculture, bioenergy, and value-added enterprises
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
31Number of animal producers adopting Extension-recommended best management practices, including those practices related to husbandry, improved planning, marketing, and financial practices
6090Net income gains by producers adopting Extension-recommended best management practices, including those practices related to husbandry, improved planning, marketing, and financial practices
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Producers will increase sales of food locally to more agriculturally aware consumers through market development, producer and consumer education, and new farmer and infrastructure support.

Value* Outcome Description
71Number of adults (including producers, food business owners, etc.) who improved knowledge of local food and agricultural systems.
55Number of children/youth who improved knowledge of local food and agricultural systems.
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Youth and adults will address community issues and/or challenges through volunteerism.

Futures that Work: School to Career Pathways

Value* Outcome Description
10Number of teachers trained in 4-H STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) curriculum
732Number of youth (students) increasing knowledge in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math)
330Total number of female participants in STEM program
124Number of high school age youth (students) participating as members of 4-H clubs
220Number of high school age youth (students) participating as members in 4-H clubs that have dropped out of high school
1458Number of youth (students) increasing knowledge of career/employability skills
50Number of adults increasing knowledge of career/employability skills
1458Number of youth (students) increasing knowledge of entrepreneurship
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
10Number of teachers using 4-H STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) curriculum in their classrooms
732Number of youth (students) gaining knowledge in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math)
1458Number of youth (students) gaining career / employability skills
1458Number of youth (students) gaining entrepreneurship skills
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Consumers and communities will enhance the value of plants, animals, and landscapes while conserving valuable natural resources and protecting the environment.

Value* Outcome Description
102Number of participants improving knowledge, attitude, skills and aspirations regarding gardening and landscape practices including plant selection and placement, turfgrass management, soil management, growing food, water conservation and water quality preservation, storm water and erosion management, green waste management, pest and wildlife management
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
102Number of participants who use extension-recommended best management practices in landscapes, turf, and gardens, including pest (insect, weed, disease) management, fertility management, water conservation, water quality preservation and pruning techniques
12000Total cost savings from the use of extension-recommended best management practices in landscapes, turf, and gardens, including pest (insect, weed, disease) management, fertility management, water conservation, water quality preservation and pruning techniques
30Number of participants who use extension-recommended pest management practices in homes, public facilities, businesses or in community pest management programs
75Number of participants selecting appropriate landscape plants (adapted, drought tolerant, appropriate size, etc.)
37Number of participants growing food for home consumption
21Number of participants implementing extension-recommended practices to conserve water use and protect water qualty
21Number of participants implementing extension-recommended practices to conserve water use and protect water qualtiy
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Youth and adult program participants will make healthy food choices, achieve the recommended amount of physical activity and reduce risk factors for chronic diseases.

Value* Impact Description
87Number of adults increasing their fruit and vegetables consumption
467Number of youth increasing their fruit and vegetable consumption
285Number of participants increasing their physical activity
51Number of participants reducing their BMI
15Number of adults who reduce their total cholesterol
83Number of participants who consume less sodium in their diet
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

IV. Number of Contacts Made by Extension

Type of ContactNumber
Face-to-face* 20,539
Non face-to-face** 58,384
Total by Extension staff in 2018 78,923
* Face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make directly with individuals through one-on-one visits, meetings, and other activities where staff members work directly with individuals.
** Non face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make indirectly with individuals by telephone, email, newsletters, news articles, radio, television, and other means.

V. Designated Grants Received by Extension

Type of GrantAmount
Contracts/Grants $5,250.00
Gifts/Donations $9,132.58
In-Kind Grants/Donations $0.00
United Way/Foundations $0.00
User Fees $0.00
Total $14,382.58

VI. Volunteer Involvement in Extension Programs

Number of Volunteers* Number of Volunteer Hours Known client contacts by volunteers Dollar Value at 25.43
4-H: 410 282 255 $ 7,171.00
Advisory Leadership System: 48 12 25 $ 305.00
Extension Community Association: 0 0 0 $ 0.00
Extension Master Gardener: 18 90 30 $ 2,289.00
Other: 95 252 86 $ 6,408.00
Total: 571 636 396 $ 16,173.00
* The number of volunteers reflects the overall number of volunteers for multiple events.

VII. Membership of Advisory Leadership System

Martin County Advisory Leadership Council
George Ayers
Donald Beacham
Jean Brownfield
Barney Conway
Angela Cross
Shelly Coburn
Wesley Copeland
Georgie Griffin, III
Tracey Harding
Richard James
Stephen Lilley
Alice Matthews
Thomas Pierce
Nola Pritchett
Kit Reddick
Bull Ritter
Bernadette Rodgers
Walter Stalls
Tony Taylor
James Ward
Donnie White
Walter Whitfield
Willie Woolard
Tobacco and Peanut Advisory Committee
Ervin Bell
Greg Stalls
Donnie White
Bob James
Ben Cowin
Walter Stalls
Kevin Revels
Rob Turner
Lee Williams
Beef Cattle Advisoy Committee
Johnny Roberson
Sutton Edmondson
John Williams
Family and Consumer Science Advisory Committee
Bernadette Rodgers
Brenda Moore
Cathy Barber
Ina Slade
Natalie Wiggins
Patricia Mooring
Ronnie Smith
Agriculture Advisory Committee
Steven Lilley
Scott Bowen
Georgie Griffin
Brent Jackson
Freddie Chance
Robert Turner
Small Farms Advisory Committee
B. Kim Griffin
Willie Woolard
Thomas Pierce
Brent Jackson
Randy Pierce
4-H & Youth Advisory Committee
Jean Brownfield
Daniel Brownfield
Eric Manning
Donna Manning
Tonya Little
Lori Taylor
Tiffany Hassell-Abel
Cliff Hudson

VIII. Staff Membership

Laura Oliver
Title: County Extension Director and Extension Agent, Livestock & Horticulture
Phone: (252) 789-4370
Email: laura_oliver@ncsu.edu

Shelia Ange
Title: County Extension Administrative Assistant
Phone: (252) 789-4370
Email: shelia_ange@ncsu.edu

Elizabeth Baker
Title: Area Agent, Family & Consumer Sciences
Phone: (252) 794-6179
Email: Elizabeth_baker@ncsu.edu

Susan Chase
Title: Regional Nutrition Extension Associate - Northeast EFNEP and SNAP-Ed
Phone: (919) 827-2285
Email: susan_chase@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Job Description: Provides programmatic supervision to the EFNEP program in the Northeast District

Candice Christian
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Consumer and Retail Food Safety
Phone: (919) 515-9148
Email: Candice_Christian@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: The overall goal of the Area Specialized Agents (ASAs) in Consumer & Retail Food Safety is to support FCS Agents in delivering timely and evidence-based food safety education and information to stakeholders in North Carolina.

Erin Eure
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Commercial Fruits and Vegetables
Phone: (252) 357-1400
Email: erin_eure@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provides educational opportunities and technical support to commercial fruit and vegetable growers, agents, and industry in northeastern NC.

Steve Gabel
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Aquaculture
Phone: (252) 482-6585
Email: steve_gabel@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Responsible for aquaculture educational programs for the NC NE extension district.

Lance Grimes
Title: Extension Agent, Agriculture
Phone: (252) 789-4370
Email: lance_grimes@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Job responsibilities include: All field crops and pesticide education.

Marissa Herchler
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Animal Food Safety (FSMA Programs)
Phone: (919) 515-5396
Email: marissa_herchler@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Marissa is an Area Specialized Agent for animal food safety, with emphasis on the new Food Safety Modernization Act rules, as they apply to feed mills in North Carolina. Please contact Marissa with any FSMA related questions, or PCQI training inquiries.

Lynette Johnston
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Food Safety
Phone: (919) 515-0303
Email: lynette_johnston@ncsu.edu

Colby Lambert
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Forestry
Phone: (910) 814-6041
Email: colby_lambert@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provides educational opportunities and technical support to forest landowners, agents, and forest industry in eastern North Carolina.

Danny Lauderdale
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Nursery and Greenhouse, Eastern Region
Phone: (252) 237-0111
Email: danny_lauderdale@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provides programming to commercial ornamental nursery and greenhouse producers in eastern North Carolina.

Bill Lord
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Water Resources
Phone: (919) 496-3344
Email: william_lord@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Water quality education and technical assistance

Lori McBryde
Title: Area 4-H Agent, East Region
Phone: (919) 989-5380
Email: lori_mcbryde@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provide support the Eastern 34 Counties of the Northeast and Southeast Districts in 4-H Youth Development.

Kyndle Nichols
Title: Extension Agent, 4-H Youth Development
Phone: (252) 789-4370
Email: kcnicho3@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: 4-H Youth Development

Joy Pierce
Title: County Extension Support Specialist
Phone: (252) 789-4370
Email: joy_pierce@ncsu.edu

Margaret Ross
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Poultry
Phone: (252) 670-8254
Email: margaret_ross@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Working with commercial poultry producers to assist in writing nutrient management plans and conducting educational programming.

Chip Simmons
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Food Safety
Phone: (919) 414-5632
Email: odsimmon@ncsu.edu

Lisa Smith
Title: EFNEP Educator, Family and Consumer Sciences
Phone: (252) 789-4370
Email: Lfsmith@ncat.edu

Scott Tilley
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Grain
Phone: (252) 793-4428
Email: scott_tilley@ncsu.edu

Mitch Woodward
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Watersheds and Water Quality
Phone: (919) 250-1112
Email: mdwoodwa@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: NC Cooperative Extension's Goals include: - NC's natural resources and environmental quality will be protected, conserved and enhanced. - NC will have profitable, environmentally sustainable plant, animal and food systems. Protecting our environmental resources, particularly drinking water quality, is a top priority in NC. NC Cooperative Extension is a leader in teaching, researching, and accelerating the adoption of effective water quality protection practices.

IX. Contact Information

Martin County Center
104 Kehukee Park Rd
Williamston, NC 27892

Phone: (252) 789-4370
Fax: (252) 789-4389
URL: http://martin.ces.ncsu.edu