2018 Nash County Program Impact Report

Approved: January 28, 2019

I. Executive Summary

Nash County is home to 93,991 residents. The 2010 national census describes this population to be 56% white, 39% African American, 6% Latino and 4% other. A significant portion of this population has limited resources which hampers their economic and social advancement. While Nash has traditionally been an agricultural county, it is one of eastern North Carolina’s few major health care, manufacturing and retail trade centers. Agricultural production and that way of life continue to strongly influence local decision making. Today, 430 farm operations manage an estimated 90,000 acres of crop and pasture land, producing a broadly diversified list of crops and livestock. The county’s estimated annual farm income is approaching $200 million. There is increasing interest in purchasing safe-to-eat, locally grown food.

The Cooperative Extension program in Nash County connects the resources and knowledge of our state's land-grant universities to people in our county through informal educational opportunities. Our efforts are guided by the needs and issues identified in the county and our staff develop programs to address those critical needs with the resources available. Nash County Cooperative Extension team helped create prosperity for Nash County through programs and partnerships focused on agriculture and food, health and nutrition, community development and 4-H youth development.

Nash County 2018 programmatic highlights:
- 133 workshops, programs, tours, training, field days and meetings provided for 2983 Nash County participants
- 84,355 people made contact with our extension services through agent contact, volunteer led contact or through non face to face contact
- 37 people reported developing skills in leading community, economic, and/or disaster planning and change
- 26 people reported gaining basic financial management knowledge and/or skills (such as; budgeting, record keeping, goal setting, writing goals, consumer decision-making)
- 724 farmers who produce crops reported an increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, and/or skills as related to: 1. Best management production practices (cultural, nutrient, and genetics) 2. Pest/insect, disease, weed, wildlife management 3. Financial/Farm management tools and practices (business, marketing, government policy, human resources) 4. Alternative agriculture, bioenergy, and value-added enterprises
- 58 producers reported increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, and/or skills as related to: 1. Best management production practices (cultural, nutrient, and genetics) 2. Pest/insect, disease, weed, wildlife management 3. Financial/Farm management tools and practices (business, marketing, government policy, human resources) 4. Alternative agriculture, bioenergy, and value-added enterprises
- 70 (K-5th grade) teachers trained in 4-H STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) curriculum
- Teachers observed 3,812 students showed increased knowledge in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) because of 4-H STEM curriculum
- 689 students reported gaining career / employability skills through 4-H program participation
- $1,425,000 Net income gains realized by the adoption of best management practices, including those practices related to nutrient management, conservation, production, cultivars, pest management (weeds, diseases, insects), business management, and marketing
- 356 participants used extension-recommended pest management practices in homes, public facilities, businesses or in community pest management programs
- 220 food handlers received food safety training and education in safe food handling practices (new required data for federal reporting)
- 1168 volunteers provided 3,733 hours to reach 4,482 Nash County citizens at a cost value of $92,267


Nash County faces challenges. The developing nature of the county is generating concern for the county’s lack of formalized farmland preservation. The high school graduation rate is only 83%. The county is included in a 4-county region having North Carolina’s greatest occurrence of childhood and adult obesity. While progress is being made, the public water system is not yet serving some large rural areas of the county. High speed internet connectivity is not available county-wide at reasonable cost however progress is moving in right direction. The number of local jobs has declined, with a shift away from manufacturing to lower paid service jobs.

Our County Plan of Work seeks to positively impact many of these issues through extension education. Extension educational programs will continue to target the county's productive and profitable agricultural industry. The production and sales of local foods will be encouraged with continued management of a regional farmer’s market in Rocky Mount, N.C. The limited resource audience will be intentionally targeted with extension educational programs for financial management, leadership development, entrepreneurship and community development. Additional youth and parents will be involved in the dynamic "Learn By Doing" 4-H Youth Development program.

II. County Background

Nash County is home to 93,919 residents. The 2010 national census describes this population to be 56% white, 39% African American, 6% Latino and 4% other. A significant portion of this population has limited resources which hampers their economic and social advancement. While Nash has traditionally been an agricultural county, it is one of eastern North Carolina’s few major health care, manufacturing and retail trade centers. Agricultural production and that way of life continue to strongly influence local decision making. Today, 430 farm operations manage an estimated 90,000 acres of crop and pasture land, producing a broadly diversified list of crops and livestock. The county’s estimated annual farm income is approaching $200 million. There is increasing interest in purchasing safe-to-eat, locally grown food.

Nash County faces challenges. The developing nature of the county is generating concern for the county’s lack of formalized farmland preservation. The high school graduation rate is 84%. The county is included in a 4-county region having North Carolina’s greatest occurrence of childhood and adult obesity. While progress is being made, the public water system is not yet serving all large rural areas of the county. High speed internet connectivity is not available county-wide at reasonable cost. The number of local jobs has declined, with a shift away from manufacturing to lower paid service jobs.

The Atlantic Coast Natural Gas Pipeline is proposed to cross the county, distributing natural gas from fracking activity in other states. This new source of energy will be delivered initially for powering electricity generating power plants in other counties. The proposed route for pipeline installation is likely to impact approximately 200 landowners in the county.
In July 2016, the state of North Carolina, the Carolina's Gateway Partnership and CSX proudly announced Rocky Mount, North Carolina, as the home for a new intermodal rail terminal known as the Carolina Connector, or CCX. However, this announcement hit a snag when the CEO passed away and the new CEO changed the company's vision hence not fully committing to continue to build the CSX. This $270M+ critical infrastructure projected to serve as a major transportation hub in the Southeast, and a catalyst for substantial economic growth throughout the state of North Carolina and was expected to open 2020. At this time, the project is in a standstill.

This 2018 County Plan of Work seeks to positively impact many of these issues through extension education. Extension educational programs will continue to target the county's productive and profitable agricultural industry. The production and sales of local foods will be encouraged with continued management of a regional farmer’s market in Rocky Mount, N.C. The limited resource audience will be intentionally targeted with extension educational programs for financial management, leadership development, entrepreneurship and community development. Additional youth and parents will be involved in the dynamic "Learn By Doing" 4-H Youth Development program. Continual educational efforts will also be directed toward local landowners affected by the Atlantic Coast Natural Gas Pipeline.

III. Objectives to Address the Cooperative Extension Long Range Plan

North Carolina's plant production systems will become more profitable and sustainable.

Value* Outcome Description
724Number of crop (all plant systems) producers increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, and/or skills as related to: 1. Best management production practices (cultural, nutrient, and genetics) 2. Pest/insect, disease, weed, wildlife management 3. Financial/Farm management tools and practices (business, marketing, government policy, human resources) 4. Alternative agriculture, bioenergy, and value-added enterprises
4Number of Extension initiated and controlled County demonstration test sites (new required for GLF/PSI reporting)
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
765Number of crop (all plant systems) producers adopting best management practices, including those practices related to nutrient management, conservation, production, cultivars, pest management (weeds, diseases, insects), business management, and marketing
1425000Net income gains realized by the adoption of best management practices, including those practices related to nutrient management, conservation, production, cultivars, pest management (weeds, diseases, insects), business management, and marketing
430Number of producers reporting increased dollar returns per acre or reduced costs per acre
183Number of producers reporting reduction in fertilizer used per acre
50000Number of acres in conservation tillage or other Best Management Practice
1Number of producers who adopted a dedicated bioenergy crop
30Number of acres planted to a dedicated bioenergy crop
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

North Carolina's animal production systems will become more profitable and sustainable.

Value* Outcome Description
58Number of animal producers increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, and/or skills as related to: 1. Best management production practices (cultural, nutrient, and genetics) 2. Pest/insect, disease, weed, wildlife management 3. Financial/Farm management tools and practices (business, marketing, government policy, human resources) 4. Alternative agriculture, bioenergy, and value-added enterprises
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
1Number of animal producers adopting Extension-recommended best management practices, including those practices related to husbandry, improved planning, marketing, and financial practices
10401Net income gains by producers adopting Extension-recommended best management practices, including those practices related to husbandry, improved planning, marketing, and financial practices
3Number of waste management certifications gained or maintained due to Extension education efforts
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Producers will increase sales of food locally to more agriculturally aware consumers through market development, producer and consumer education, and new farmer and infrastructure support.

Youth and adults will address community issues and/or challenges through volunteerism.

Value* Outcome Description
36Number of adult participants acquiring the skills needed to serve as a volunteer
12Number of youth participants reporting aspirations to serve in new or expanded volunteer roles in community
59Number of adult participants reporting aspirations to serve in new or expanded volunteer roles in community
66Number of hours adult volunteer training conducted
40Number of hours youth volunteer training conducted
22Number new volunteers recruited
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
3018Increased number of hours contributed by trained adult volunteers
2Number of youth volunteers serving in new or expanded roles within Extension
57Number of adult volunteers serving in new or expanded roles within Extension
2Number of youth volunteers serving in new or expanded roles beyond Extension, including community boards and task forces
2Number of adult volunteers serving in new or expanded roles beyond Extension, including community boards and task forces
2Number of youth volunteers recruiting and/or training new volunteers
26Number of adult volunteers recruiting and/or training new volunteers
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Community members, organizations and local government will engage in collaborative dialog and decision-making to build economically, socially and environmentally resilient communities. This will be done through inclusive engagement, partnership building, and/or community planning.

Value* Outcome Description
37Number of participants increasing knowledge and skills in convening and leading inclusive, representative groups (including limited resources, new resident, or immigrant groups) for evidence based community development
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
12Number of participants who report new or expanded leadership roles and opportunities undertaken
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Futures that Work: School to Career Pathways

Value* Outcome Description
70Number of teachers trained in 4-H STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) curriculum
3812Number of youth (students) increasing knowledge in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math)
1897Total number of female participants in STEM program
64Number of high school age youth (students) participating as members of 4-H clubs
689Number of youth (students) increasing knowledge of career/employability skills
18Number of youth (students) increasing knowledge of entrepreneurship
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
70Number of teachers using 4-H STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) curriculum in their classrooms
3812Number of youth (students) gaining knowledge in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math)
284Number of youth (students) gaining career / employability skills
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Consumers and communities will enhance the value of plants, animals, and landscapes while conserving valuable natural resources and protecting the environment.

Value* Outcome Description
275Number of participants improving knowledge, attitude, skills and aspirations regarding gardening and landscape practices including plant selection and placement, turfgrass management, soil management, growing food, water conservation and water quality preservation, storm water and erosion management, green waste management, pest and wildlife management
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
243Number of participants who use extension-recommended best management practices in landscapes, turf, and gardens, including pest (insect, weed, disease) management, fertility management, water conservation, water quality preservation and pruning techniques
356Number of participants who use extension-recommended pest management practices in homes, public facilities, businesses or in community pest management programs
220Number of participants selecting appropriate landscape plants (adapted, drought tolerant, appropriate size, etc.)
45Number of participants adopting composting
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Youth and adult program participants will make healthy food choices, achieve the recommended amount of physical activity and reduce risk factors for chronic diseases.

Value* Impact Description
188Number of adults increasing their fruit and vegetables consumption
56Number of youth increasing their fruit and vegetable consumption
88Number of participants increasing their physical activity
13Number of adults who reduce their blood pressure
18Number of participants who consume less sodium in their diet
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

IV. Number of Contacts Made by Extension

Type of ContactNumber
Face-to-face* 18,378
Non face-to-face** 65,667
Total by Extension staff in 2018 84,045
* Face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make directly with individuals through one-on-one visits, meetings, and other activities where staff members work directly with individuals.
** Non face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make indirectly with individuals by telephone, email, newsletters, news articles, radio, television, and other means.

V. Designated Grants Received by Extension

Type of GrantAmount
Contracts/Grants $500.00
Gifts/Donations $0.00
In-Kind Grants/Donations $2,151.00
United Way/Foundations $0.00
User Fees $2,975.00
Total $5,626.00

VI. Volunteer Involvement in Extension Programs

Number of Volunteers* Number of Volunteer Hours Known client contacts by volunteers Dollar Value at 25.43
4-H: 260 628 1,184 $ 15,970.00
Advisory Leadership System: 39 27 50 $ 687.00
Extension Community Association: 0 0 0 $ 0.00
Extension Master Gardener: 786 3,019 1,777 $ 76,773.00
Other: 83 63 1,471 $ 1,602.00
Total: 1168 3737 4482 $ 95,032.00
* The number of volunteers reflects the overall number of volunteers for multiple events.

VII. Membership of Advisory Leadership System

County Extension Advisory Council
Kirby Brown
Wanda Bunn
Joie Byrne
Reggie Cobb
Robbie Davis
Bobby Joe Fisher
John Gibson, Jr.
George Jeffries
Warnell Joyner
Dr. Kathy Lawson
Sydney Phillips
Parker Philips
Kenneth Powell
Barbara High Tyre
Community & Rural Development Council
Robert Alston
Marvin Arrington
David Bowens
Elsie Bowens
Anna Deans
Brenda Foster
Gary Foster
George Jefferies
Betty T. Lowe
James Parker
Elsie Ricks
Carolyn Williams
Horticulture Advisory Committee
Joie Byrne
Carol Wright
Nelson White
Cindy Brantley
Anna Stark
Cyndy Scalf
Maggie Barkley
Linda Tippette
Lee McCollum
Sue Moore
Phyllis Collie
Anne Sickinger
Mark Frohman
4-H Advisory Committee
Jennifer Aycock
Maycee Aycock
Wanda Bunn
Jessica Daughtridge
Cheryl Glover
Molly LaHay
Kathy Lawson
Sue Leggett
Tamara Moore
Shay Skinner
Marina Strickland
Mary Strickland
Marlene Strufe
Barbara Tyre
Jane Tyson
Damien Whitley
Cullin Whitley
Susan Whitley
Chris Winstead
Marley Winstead
Brenda Wind
Melissa Winner
County Agriculture Advisory Board
Steve Bass
Dan Cone
Linda Fisher
David O. Griffin
Gary High
Brent Leggett
Brandon Moore
Michael Strickland
Jeff Tyson
Ronnie Weaver
Orville Wiggins
Livestock Production Committee
Wanda Bunn
Brent Creech
Linda Fisher
Bill Freeman
Mark Hucks
Molly LaHay
Melissa Winner
Cole Younger
Family & Consumer Sciences Advisory Committee
Ann Bass
Susan Perry Cole
Derrick Haskins
Evangeline Grant
Sydney Phillips

VIII. Staff Membership

Sandy Hall
Title: County Extension Director and Extension Agent, 4-H Youth Development
Phone: (252) 459-9810
Email: sandy_hall@ncsu.edu

Maurine Brown
Title: Farmers Market Manager, Nash County Farmers Market
Phone: (252) 459-9810
Email: maurine_brown@ncsu.edu

Daniel Campeau
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Poultry
Phone: (919) 542-8202
Email: dan_campeau@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Work mainly with Commercial Poultry industry. I also work with small scale poultry production. Service area is now the North Central District from Guilford to Halifax with the southern edge being Chatham and Wake county respectively.

Traci Dixon
Title: Extension Agent, Community and Rural Development
Phone: (252) 459-9810
Email: traci_dixon@ncsu.edu

Erin Eure
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Commercial Fruits and Vegetables
Phone: (252) 357-1400
Email: erin_eure@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provides educational opportunities and technical support to commercial fruit and vegetable growers, agents, and industry in northeastern NC.

Steve Gabel
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Aquaculture
Phone: (252) 482-6585
Email: steve_gabel@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Responsible for aquaculture educational programs for the NC NE extension district.

Marissa Herchler
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Animal Food Safety (FSMA Programs)
Phone: (919) 515-5396
Email: marissa_herchler@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Marissa is an Area Specialized Agent for animal food safety, with emphasis on the new Food Safety Modernization Act rules, as they apply to feed mills in North Carolina. Please contact Marissa with any FSMA related questions, or PCQI training inquiries.

Lynette Johnston
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Food Safety
Phone: (919) 515-0303
Email: lynette_johnston@ncsu.edu

Colby Lambert
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Forestry
Phone: (910) 814-6041
Email: colby_lambert@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provides educational opportunities and technical support to forest landowners, agents, and forest industry in eastern North Carolina.

Danny Lauderdale
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Nursery and Greenhouse, Eastern Region
Phone: (252) 237-0111
Email: danny_lauderdale@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provides programming to commercial ornamental nursery and greenhouse producers in eastern North Carolina.

Kelsey Lichtenwalner
Title: Extension Agent, Agriculture - Livestock
Phone: (252) 641-7827
Email: kelsey_lichtenwalner@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Responsible for helping farmers start, manage, grow, and improve their herd and/or farm, as well as educating the community about Agriculture.

Bill Lord
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Water Resources
Phone: (919) 496-3344
Email: william_lord@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Water quality education and technical assistance

Lori McBryde
Title: Area 4-H Agent, East Region
Phone: (919) 989-5380
Email: lori_mcbryde@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provide support the Eastern 34 Counties of the Northeast and Southeast Districts in 4-H Youth Development.

Barbara Monk
Title: County Extension Administrative Assistant
Phone: (252) 459-1409
Email: Barbara_Monk@ncsu.edu

Regina Moseley
Title: Extension Agent, Family and Consumer Sciences
Phone: (252) 459-9810
Email: regina_moseley@ncsu.edu

Amy Ormond
Title: 4-H Program Assistant, 4-H Youth Development
Phone: (252) 459-9810
Email: amy_ormond@ncsu.edu

Chip Simmons
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Food Safety
Phone: (919) 414-5632
Email: odsimmon@ncsu.edu

Matt Stevens
Title: Extension Agent, Agriculture - Commercial and Consumer Horticulture
Phone: (252) 459-9810
Email: matt_stevens@ncsu.edu

Debbie Stroud
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Consumer and Retail Food Safety
Phone: (919) 515-9149
Email: dlstroud@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Area Specialized Agents in Consumer and Retail Food Safety help to ensure that Family and Consumer Sciences (FCS) Agents have access to timely, evidence-based food safety information. This is accomplished by (1) working with FCS Agents in their counties, (2) developing food safety materials and (3) planning and implementing a NC Safe Plates Food Safety Info Center.

Megan Turner
Title: County Extension Secretary, 4-H Youth Development
Phone: (252) 459-9810
Email: megan_turner@ncsu.edu

Maryanna Waters
Title: Extension Agent, Agriculture - Field Crops
Phone: (252) 459-9810
Email: Maryanna_Bennett@ncsu.edu

Brenda Wind
Title: Program Assistant, 4-H Youth Development
Phone: (252) 459-9810
Email: bwind@ncsu.edu

Mitch Woodward
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Watersheds and Water Quality
Phone: (919) 250-1112
Email: mdwoodwa@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: NC Cooperative Extension's Goals include: - NC's natural resources and environmental quality will be protected, conserved and enhanced. - NC will have profitable, environmentally sustainable plant, animal and food systems. Protecting our environmental resources, particularly drinking water quality, is a top priority in NC. NC Cooperative Extension is a leader in teaching, researching, and accelerating the adoption of effective water quality protection practices.

IX. Contact Information

Nash County Center
1006 Eastern Ave, Room 102
Nash County Ag Center
Nashville, NC 27856

Phone: (252) 459-9810
Fax: (252) 459-9850
URL: http://nash.ces.ncsu.edu