2017 Northampton County Program Impact Report

Approved: January 26, 2018

I. Executive Summary

In 2017, the Northampton County Extension staff worked to address the issues and needs that had been identified as a priority by county stakeholders and a local needs assessment conducted by the Northampton Extension Staff.

Agriculture is the economic driver in Northampton County with 115 million dollars in annual cash receipts (2016 NCDA records). Cooperative Extension interfaced with Northampton farmers delivering research based information that provided these producers with knowledge to make production decisions focused at increasing net farm income by managing production costs. As a result of Cooperative Extension’s efforts, 37 farmers increased net income by implementing Extension recommended production and marketing practices. These farmers also adopted best management practices related to nutrient management, conservation, production, cultivars, pest management (weeds, diseases, insects), business management, and marketing. Grower surveys report: local on farm testing impacted 37,653 acres; Integrated Pest Management impacted 31,118 acres; and resistant weed management education impacted 42,693 acres.

Educational programs targeting farmers and landowners were held to promote environmental conservation. One hundred eighty-one participants demonstrated an increase in knowledge about natural resources and environmental conservation; 607 (some duplication) pesticide applicators received pesticide education to maintain re-certification; 2,840 gallons of used motor oil were collected to be recycled; 36 animal producers adopted or improved their extension-recommended best management practices related to animal husbandry and improved planning; 13 animal producers received continuing education for Certified Animal Waste Operators; 148 acres transferred property ownership with continued enrollment and 295 new acres were enrolled in the Northampton County Voluntary Agriculture District due to extension efforts; 2,813 pounds of plastic pesticide containers and drums were granulated to be recycled; 3,952 pounds of old pesticide were removed and properly disposed of at a hazardous waste facility.

Northampton County is a tier one county in North Carolina. Northampton is a rural county where agriculture is the principal industry and source of income, still most of the students don't know the importance of agriculture in the County and how local food can improve income of local citizens. The health assessment completed in 2015 showed Northampton County has an obesity rate of 35.6% which is higher than the state average at 30%. To address this issue, the Small farms agent and the 4-H program assistant started a school gardening program with thirty-six 4th grade participants. As a result of the junior master gardener program, students reported learning where their food came from, how to plant and take care of the garden, as well as what is important for plant growth. Seventy-seven percent of the students said they now know how to plan a garden before planting, Sixty-eight percent said they will eat more vegetables and over sixty percent would teach someone about gardening.

The improper handling of food accounts for a high percentage of the reported 48 million cases of food borne illness each year in the United States. The Family and Consumer Sciences agent at Northampton County Center provided a 16-hour food safety certification course. Seventeen restaurant managers and school food service employees completed the food safety training. Through course evaluations, participants reported increased knowledge and skills that will be implemented in their establishments.

Family and consumer science programming focused on nutrition and physical activity, chronic disease prevention and food safety. Highlights of the Family and Consumer Science Program include: 246 youth received knowledge on healthy eating habits and increasing physical activity; over 1200 youth received a Fruit/Vegetable bag with fresh produce and fact sheet/recipe; 133 adults received knowledge on healthy eating habits and increasing physical activity; 18 adults have connected with on-going chronic disease/diabetes management support group.

Health Matters focused on healthy food access in Northampton County. Two of four stores were contacted directly and assisted with implementing standards to become Healthy Food Retail stores. Health Matters assisted with enhancing the Garysburg Farmer’s Market by providing produce stands, recipe cards, recipe card display, and signage.

Health Matters provided a workshop promoting physical activity access. Northampton communities, organizations, schools, businesses, and faith-based organizations were educated on Shared Use benefits, how to implement, how to access resources, and discuss barriers and challenges as well as success stories.

Health Matters assisted with enhancing 3 parks and 1 school walking track to promote physical activity:
♣ Woodland NC- Provided signage (welcome sign at the road, park rules, feature signs), technical assistance provided with installation of playground equipment, provided surface materials for playground equipment and swing set, and provided recreation equipment for Youth Fun days including soccer balls, cones, jump ropes, hula hoops, tug of war rope, and water cooler with disposable cups
♣ Seaboard NC- provided surface material for playground, park benches, and water misting tower
♣ Garysburg NC- provided park bench, trash receptacles, and signage (welcome sign, play area rules, walking track rules, distance sign)
♣ Central Elementary Walking Track- provided signage (Walking track rules and distance signs), benches and shade structure, outdoor basketball goal, and trash receptacles

Providing families with research-based nutrition knowledge facilitates the acquisition of sound dietary behaviors. Using EFNEP's Families Eating Smart Moving More curriculum, the nutrition program assistant in Northampton County provided 130 limited income families with basic nutrition information. Of the 104 families that graduated from the program, 98 percent improved dietary intake; 64 percent improved in the amount of physical activity practiced; 98 percent improved in one or more food resource management practices (i.e. plans meals, compares prices, uses grocery lists, does not run out of food); and 98 percent improved their diet.

In 2017, the 4-H program in Northampton County helped young people develop life skills, character, and social skills to become productive citizens. Three areas of focus were defined: school to career, community development, and volunteer readiness. A total of 1,184 (duplication eliminated) young people were involved in the 4-H program, which included camps, 4-H clubs, and 4-H curriculum utilized in school classrooms. To support 4-H, $4,444 was raised or donated as in-kind goods to the program. 

A variety of programs were offered to promote positive youth development through 4-H. School enrichment programs, utilizing 4-H research-based curriculum, were offered to 704 students. Topics included embryology, character education and drug prevention. Over 677 young people participated in six-hour learning experiences, called special interest 4-H programs. Twelve youth participated in the 4-H public speaking program, called District Activity Day. Nine of those youths then competed at the state level and three won gold medals and one won silver. Additionally, thirty-five youth competed in the 4-H Livestock Show and Sale. Lastly, one 4-H member competed and finished eighth in the state-level 4-H Livestock Skill-a-thon Competition.

To teach the importance of agriculture and what it takes to farm, the Cooperative Extension in Northampton County was involved in providing an Animal-Ag Day Camp for 157 students at a local school. Eight high school participants were exposed to animal and row crop agriculture; the importance of marketing a product; and how to develop a business plan.

The Northampton County Extension Office received a total of $66,426 from individuals, businesses, grants and community organizations to support its programs. These programs included 4-H overnight camp, 4-H scholarships, 4-H education programs, 4-H special interest workshops, Health Matters, FCS, EFNEP and agricultural education programs.

In 2017, Cooperative Extension made 20,550 face-to-face contacts with individuals. These contacts included one-on-one visits, and other activities where staff members worked directly with individuals. Extension staff made an additional 11,739 non-face-to-face contacts directly and indirectly with individuals by telephone, newsletter and e-mail. The efforts of Cooperative Extension to the citizens of Northampton County are significantly increased through volunteers. In 2017, volunteers assisting extension provided 1,143 hours at a value of $27,592 to the citizens of Northampton County.

II. County Background

Northampton County has a population of 20,426 people (2015 Census estimate). There are 8,630 households. The county is challenged with many citizens living in poverty (26.8%). Many citizens lack skills to be effective in the technology and information driven economy. Northampton County has a strong agriculture base. The county ranks 31st among the 100 North Carolina counties with a 2015 agriculture income of $124,510,747. In 2015, the county ranked second among the North Carolina counties in cotton production, 8th in peanuts, 20th in soybeans, 14th in hogs and pigs, and 26th in broilers. The Northampton Board of Commissioners in their county goals identified the need to promote economic development, good stewardship of natural resources, community and rural development, drug awareness and use prevention, educating citizens to prepare them for the future work force, health education, and ensuring the fiscal stability of the county.

Northampton County Cooperative Extension conducted a comprehensive needs assessment in the summer and fall of 2007. The needs assessment process consisted of meetings with the county extension advisory leadership council, advisory program committees, one-on-one interviews with key county leaders, and surveys distributed in meetings and mailings. One hundred and seventy-five people were involved in the needs assessment process. Extension agents reviewed planning documents of other county agencies and non-profit organizations. Extension agents completed a county profile using demographic data available on Northampton County. County extension agents then conducted an analysis of county priorities for identified needs and assets. As a result of the analysis, seven priority issues were identified for Cooperative Extension Program efforts. The issues in priority order are as follows: 1. Health and Nutrition/Obesity and lack of physical activity; 2. Profitable agriculture; 3. Youth need positive experiences (leadership development and community service); 4. Youth need positive social skills; 5. Family financial management; 6. Risk management; 7. Food safety. In 2008, Cooperative Extension further identified the need to focus extension program efforts to assist Northampton County citizens with increasing their skills and knowledge to cope with difficult financial times. In 2017 Cooperative Extension staff, will provide interdisciplinary programs that will be outcome based on helping Northampton County citizens cope with economically stressful times.

Cooperative Extension has the resources to address these priority issues. Research based information and curriculum is available through North Carolina Cooperative Extension. Extension specialists at NC State University and NC A&T State University are available to provide technical assistance as well as training to extension agents and program assistants in each of the identified areas. Extension’s role in addressing these county areas of concern will vary in the implementation of the county extension program. Cooperative Extension can serve as the key leader in planning and delivery of educational programs to address these needs, be a partner in working with other agencies and organizations to address these matters, and lead collaborative efforts to address these issues. Extension’s educational programs will increase awareness and help Northampton County citizens to make better-informed decisions.

III. Objectives to Address the Cooperative Extension Long Range Plan

North Carolina's plant production systems will become more profitable and sustainable.

Value* Outcome Description
37Number of crop (all plant systems) producers increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, and/or skills as related to: 1. Best management production practices (cultural, nutrient, and genetics) 2. Pest/insect, disease, weed, wildlife management 3. Financial/Farm management tools and practices (business, marketing, government policy, human resources) 4. Alternative agriculture, bioenergy, and value-added enterprises
7Number of Extension initiated and controlled County demonstration test sites (new required for GLF/PSI reporting)
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
5Number of crop (all plant systems) producers adopting best management practices, including those practices related to nutrient management, conservation, production, cultivars, pest management (weeds, diseases, insects), business management, and marketing
4926034Net income gains realized by the adoption of best management practices, including those practices related to nutrient management, conservation, production, cultivars, pest management (weeds, diseases, insects), business management, and marketing
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

North Carolina's animal production systems will become more profitable and sustainable.

Value* Outcome Description
36Number of animal producers increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, and/or skills as related to: 1. Best management production practices (cultural, nutrient, and genetics) 2. Pest/insect, disease, weed, wildlife management 3. Financial/Farm management tools and practices (business, marketing, government policy, human resources) 4. Alternative agriculture, bioenergy, and value-added enterprises
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
36Number of animal producers adopting Extension-recommended best management practices, including those practices related to husbandry, improved planning, marketing, and financial practices
13825Net income gains by producers adopting Extension-recommended best management practices, including those practices related to husbandry, improved planning, marketing, and financial practices
13Number of animal producers implementing Extension-recommended best management practices for animal waste management
13Number of waste management certifications gained or maintained due to Extension education efforts
480Number of acres where Extension-recommended waste analysis was used for proper land application
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Producers will increase sales of food locally to more agriculturally aware consumers through market development, producer and consumer education, and new farmer and infrastructure support.

Value* Outcome Description
16Number of producers who gain skills or knowledge to increase production for local markets.
30Number of adults (including producers, food business owners, etc.) who improved knowledge of local food and agricultural systems.
151Number of children/youth who improved knowledge of local food and agricultural systems.
81Number of individuals who gain knowledge or acquire skills related to vegetable/fruit gardening, and if also reporting under Urban and Consumer Agriculture Objective, divide up the reported number appropriately between the two objectives to avoid duplication.
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
4Number of new and existing access points for consumers that expand or improve their offering of local fruits and vegetables. Access points include farmers markets, retail stores, school food programs, community gardens, institutions other than schools (e.g. hospitals, universities, etc.), and other systems/access points not noted (e.g. restaurants, etc.).
5Number of producers selling their agricultural products to local markets (direct, intermediated/food service, institutional) for consumption in NC.
1Number of producers who diversified their marketing strategies into local markets (direct, intermediated/food service, institutional).
25000Gross sales of local foods by producers. (Increase in gross sales to be calculated at the state level.)
5Number of producers (and other members of the local food supply chain) who have increased revenue.
2Number of new farms (beginning farmers) selling into local markets for local consumption (in this reporting period).
49Number of individuals who grow food in community gardens.
450Number of pounds of local foods donated for consumption by vulnerable populations.
28Number of youth who grow food in school gardens.
15Number of individuals who begin home food production by starting a vegetable and/or fruit garden, and if also reporting under Urban and Consumer Horticulture Objective, divide up the reported number appropriately between the two objectives to avoid duplication.
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Agricultural producers, workers, food handlers and consumers will adopt safer food and agricultural production, handling, and distribution practices that reduce workplace and home injuries/illnesses, enhance food security, and increase the quality and safety of food that North Carolinians prepare and consume.

Value* Outcome Description
19Number of commercial/public operators trained
23Number of pesticide application credit hours provided
71Number of participants participating in AgriSafe personal protective equipment (PPE) selection or fit testing
17Number of food service employees receiving ServSafe certification
57Number of participants trained in safe home food handling, preservation, or preparation practices
18TOTAL number of food handlers receiving food safety training and education in safe food handling practices (new required data for federal reporting)
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Individuals and groups will acquire leadership and decision making capacities needed to guide and actively participate in local and state organizations.

Community members, organizations and local government will engage in collaborative dialog and decision-making to build economically, socially and environmentally resilient communities. This will be done through inclusive engagement, partnership building, and/or community planning.

Futures that Work: School to Career Pathways

Value* Outcome Description
17Number of teachers trained in 4-H STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) curriculum
307Number of youth (students) increasing knowledge in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math)
163Total number of female participants in STEM program
3Number of high school age youth (students) participating as members of 4-H clubs
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
17Number of teachers using 4-H STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) curriculum in their classrooms
307Number of youth (students) gaining knowledge in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math)
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Consumers and communities will enhance the value of plants, animals, and landscapes while conserving valuable natural resources and protecting the environment.

Value* Outcome Description
60Number of participants improving knowledge, attitude, skills and aspirations regarding gardening and landscape practices including plant selection and placement, turfgrass management, soil management, growing food, water conservation and water quality preservation, storm water and erosion management, green waste management, pest and wildlife management
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
30Number of participants who use extension-recommended best management practices in landscapes, turf, and gardens, including pest (insect, weed, disease) management, fertility management, water conservation, water quality preservation and pruning techniques
12500Total cost savings from the use of extension-recommended best management practices in landscapes, turf, and gardens, including pest (insect, weed, disease) management, fertility management, water conservation, water quality preservation and pruning techniques
33Number of participants who use extension-recommended pest management practices in homes, public facilities, businesses or in community pest management programs
13Number of participants selecting appropriate landscape plants (adapted, drought tolerant, appropriate size, etc.)
5Cost savings from the appropriate selection of landscape plants
27Number of participants growing food for home consumption
1750Value of produce grown for home consumption
7Number of participants adopting composting
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Youth and adult program participants will make healthy food choices, achieve the recommended amount of physical activity and reduce risk factors for chronic diseases.

Value* Impact Description
42Number of adults increasing their fruit and vegetables consumption
79Number of youth increasing their fruit and vegetable consumption
22Number of participants increasing their physical activity
35Number of adults who improve their blood glucose (A1c.)level
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

IV. Number of Contacts Made by Extension

Type of ContactNumber
Face-to-face* 20,550
Non face-to-face** 11,739
Total by Extension staff in 2017 32,289
* Face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make directly with individuals through one-on-one visits, meetings, and other activities where staff members work directly with individuals.
** Non face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make indirectly with individuals by telephone, email, newsletters, news articles, radio, television, and other means.

V. Designated Grants Received by Extension

Type of GrantAmount
Contracts/Grants $58,015.00
Gifts/Donations $8,202.16
In-Kind Grants/Donations $0.00
United Way/Foundations $0.00
User Fees $209.00
Total $66,426.16

VI. Volunteer Involvement in Extension Programs

Number of Volunteers* Number of Volunteer Hours Known client contacts by volunteers Dollar Value at 24.69
4-H: 169 929 3,092 $ 22,937.00
Advisory Leadership System: 95 95 0 $ 2,346.00
Extension Community Association: 0 0 0 $ 0.00
Extension Master Gardener: 0 0 0 $ 0.00
Other: 33 119 176 $ 2,938.00
Total: 297 1143 3268 $ 28,221.00
* The number of volunteers reflects the overall number of volunteers for multiple events.

VII. Membership of Advisory Leadership System

Advisory Council Members (Core Group)
Rebecca Stapleton, Chairperson
Brandon Belch, Vice-Chair
David Dunlow
Virginia McClary
Kelly Vann
Joe Martin
Keith Edwards
Lillie Pernell
Kay Winn
Cynthia Brown
David Grant
Sandra Woodard
Ronald Owens
Angie Jenkins
Ben Harris
Venus Michelle Spruill
AG Committee
Curtis Branch
Kelly Vann
Angie Jenkins
Tim Hollowell
James Flythe
Joe Martin
Luther Culpepper
Dan Taylor
Keith Edwards
David Grant
David Dunlow
Sandra Flythe
James Ben Harris
Sarah Bennett Moses
Livestock Committee
Kay Winn
Verlene Stephenson
Derreck Long
4-H Committee
Kristi Deida
Ronald Owens
Venus Michelle Spruill
Lillie Pernell
Virginia McClary
Raymond Wheeler

FCS Committee
Rebecca Stapleton
Renee Mallard
Pauline Deloatch
Richard Clayton
Virginia McClary
Marcenda Rogers
Cynthia Brown
Sandra Woodard

VIII. Staff Membership

Craig Ellison
Title: County Extension Director
Phone: (252) 534-2711
Email: craig_ellison@ncsu.edu

Anassou Banna
Title: Area Agent, Small Farms Management
Phone: (252) 358-7822
Email: anassou_banna@ncsu.edu

Robbie Bridgers
Title: County Extension Administrative Assistant
Phone: (252) 534-2711
Email: robbie_bridgers@ncsu.edu

Beth Burchell
Title: Area Agent, Agriculture - Livestock
Phone: (252) 583-5161
Email: beth_burchell@ncsu.edu

Kyleen Burgess
Title: Area Agent, Information Management
Phone: (252) 398-7477
Email: Kyleen_Burgess@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Kyleen serves as the Area Agent in Information Management for Region 3. Her counties include all of the Northeast District, Alamance Caswell, Durham, Orange, Franklin, Granville, Guilford, Person, Rockingham, Vance, Wake, Warren and Wilson counties.

Daniel Campeau
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Poultry
Phone: (919) 542-8202
Email: dan_campeau@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Work mainly with Commercial Poultry industry. I also work with small scale poultry production. Service area is now the North Central District from Guilford to Halifax with the southern edge being Chatham and Wake county respectively.

Susan Chase
Title: Regional Nutrition Extension Associate - Northeast EFNEP and SNAP-Ed
Phone: (919) 827-2285
Email: susan_chase@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Job Description: Provides programmatic supervision to the EFNEP program in the Northeast District

Erin Eure
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Commercial Fruits & Vegetables
Phone: (252) 357-1400
Email: erin_eure@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provides educational opportunities and technical support to commercial fruit and vegetable growers, agents, and industry in northeastern NC.

Steve Gabel
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Aquaculture
Phone: (252) 482-6585
Email: steve_gabel@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Responsible for aquaculture educational programs for the NC NE extension district.

Marissa Herchler
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Animal Food Safety (FSMA Programs)
Phone: (919) 515-5396
Email: marissa_herchler@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Marissa is an Area Specialized Agent for animal food safety, with emphasis on the new Food Safety Modernization Act rules, as they apply to feed mills in North Carolina. Please contact Marissa with any FSMA related questions, or PCQI training inquiries.

Lynette Johnston
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Food Safety
Phone: (919) 515-0303
Email: lynette_johnston@ncsu.edu

Danny Lauderdale
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Nursery and Greenhouse, Eastern Region
Phone: (252) 237-0111
Email: danny_lauderdale@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provides programming to commercial ornamental nursery and greenhouse producers in eastern North Carolina.

Ann Lawrence
Title: 4-H Program Associate
Phone: (252) 534-2711
Email: ann_lawrence@ncsu.edu

Bill Lord
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Water Resources
Phone: (919) 496-3344
Email: william_lord@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Water quality education and technical assistance

Lauren Morris
Title: Health Matters Associate
Phone: (252) 534-2831
Email: lcmorri5@ncsu.edu

Victoria Neff
Title: Area Agent, Agriculture - Horticulture
Phone: (252) 583-5161
Email: victoria_neff@ncsu.edu

EB Odom
Title: Area Agent, Family and Consumer Sciences
Phone: (252) 534-2711
Email: eb_odom@ncsu.edu

Margaret Ross
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Poultry
Phone: (252) 670-8254
Email: margaret_ross@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Working with commercial poultry producers to assist in writing nutrient management plans and conducting educational programming.

Chip Simmons
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Food Safety
Phone: (919) 414-5632
Email: odsimmon@ncsu.edu

Debbie Stroud
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Consumer and Retail Food Safety
Phone: (919) 515-9149
Email: dlstroud@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Area Specialized Agents in Consumer and Retail Food Safety help to ensure that Family and Consumer Sciences (FCS) Agents have access to timely, evidence-based food safety information. This is accomplished by (1) working with FCS Agents in their counties, (2) developing food safety materials and (3) planning and implementing a NC Safe Plates Food Safety Info Center.

Scott Tilley
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Field Crops
Phone: (252) 793-4428
Email: scott_tilley@ncsu.edu

Sara Villwock
Title: Extension Agent, 4-H Youth Development
Phone: (252) 534-2711
Email: sara_villwock@ncsu.edu

Tammy Vincent
Title: EFNEP Educator, Extension Program Assistant
Phone: (252) 534-2711
Email: tammy_vincent@ncsu.edu

Mitch Woodward
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Watersheds and Water Quality
Phone: (919) 250-1112
Email: mdwoodwa@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: NC Cooperative Extension's Goals include: - NC's natural resources and environmental quality will be protected, conserved and enhanced. - NC will have profitable, environmentally sustainable plant, animal and food systems. Protecting our environmental resources, particularly drinking water quality, is a top priority in NC. NC Cooperative Extension is a leader in teaching, researching, and accelerating the adoption of effective water quality protection practices.

IX. Contact Information

Northampton County Center
9495 NC Highway 305
Jackson, NC 27845

Phone: (252) 534-2831
Fax: (252) 534-1827
URL: http://northampton.ces.ncsu.edu