2018 Perquimans County Program Impact Report

Approved: February 5, 2019

I. Executive Summary

North Carolina Cooperative Extension - Perquimans County Center provides non-biased, research-based information on three core areas: Farming/Food/and 4-H Youth Development. Informal teaching methods, such as on-site farm test plots; hands-on nutrition classes; and interactive youth workshops are the strategies used to “extend” timely information from the land-grant universities to the people of Perquimans County.
Advisory committees targeted several objectives including:

PROFITABLE AND SUSTAINABLE PLANT PRODUCTION - Programs like Northeast Ag Expo, Variety Field Trials, Certification Courses, and Safety Trainings were taught regionally and locally. Reports indicated 888 agricultural professionals received training hours and saved $526,948 by adopting Extension recommended farm management practices.

PROFITABLE AND SUSTAINABLE ANIMAL PRODUCTION – Programs like the Albemarle Livestock Show, Northeast Pork and Beef Conferences, Spring Equine Clinics, Pasture Renovations Demonstrations, Farm Safety Day Community Outreach Events taught better managements practices to producers and participants – saving over $132,595 in agricultural expenses and earning a combined total of $291,397 in additional income.

HEALTHY EATING, PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AND CHRONIC DISEASE RISK REDUCTION - Aging with Gusto Conference Workshops, Steps to Health Training, Expanded Foods and Nutrition Programs and Master Food Volunteer Courses reached 577 individuals – with 30% reporting making better food choices and increasing physical activity to prevent long term health illnesses.

FAMILY FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT SKILLS -
Extension volunteers educated 430 adults saving a total of $110,000 in health insurance costs by make better choices about coverage.

SCHOOL TO CAREER – programs like School Enrichment, Health Rocks Training, Farm Day Adventures Outreach and Horse Club Activities promoted life skills and decision making - with 515 youth reporting improvements in grades and increasing interest in community service.

VOLUNTEER READINESS - In 2018, Perquimans Extension made 11,111 direct and 25,272 indirect contacts; received $67,855 in grants/donations and credits 362 volunteers as clocking 1,196 hours of service - reaching 2,252 contacts - for a dollar value of $29,529.

II. County Background

The North Carolina Cooperative Extension Service - Perquimans County Center is a branch of the local county government and proudly partners with North Carolina State University in Raleigh and A&T State University in Greensboro, to reach and teach local residents with non-biased research-based information. Our priority is to educate the community and prepare citizens to make informed decisions that benefit all families and agricultural producers. Our greatest asset is our team of professionals and volunteers that stand ready to serve the community and share knowledge in safe trusted informal settings in our area.

Perquimans is a rural county located in northeastern, North Carolina, with a population of 13,453. It consists of 329 square miles, of which 247 is land and 82 is water. Bodies of water that influence the county and stimulate the economy include the Albemarle Sound, the Perquimans River, the Little River, and the Yeopim River. The southern tip of the Great Dismal Swamp extends into the northern portion of the county. There are two incorporated towns located in the county - Hertford and Winfall.

Agriculture continues to be the primary source of income for the county. The 2012 Census of Agriculture reported Perquimans has 185 farms cultivating 80,116 acres of land. Gross farm income, not including forestry while including government payments, exceeded $105 million in 2014. The median age of county residents is 48 years based on 2010 census data. Approximately 21% of the residents are younger than 18 years of age while 32% are 60 or older. The per capita income level is $22,954 and 19% of residents live below the poverty level.

Through the midpoint of the last decade, the county experienced a significant increase in housing growth due to the influx of retirees from metropolitan areas of Virginia and northern states. This has resulted in increased land prices and more stress on county government to provide infrastructure to meet the needs of new residents. On the positive side, residential growth has favorably impacted the county tax base.

The Perquimans Cooperative Extension Center uses environmental scanning methods to learn about issues facing the county. Mail surveys, electronic surveys, one-on-one interviews, and focus groups are used as needs assessment. Based on feedback, issues of concern included improving health and nutrition for youth and families, improving the agricultural and food supply system in North Carolina which includes natural resources and environmental stewardship issues, and increasing leadership, personal development and citizenship skills. Stakeholders felt that these issues are within Extension's "range" of programmatic expertise.

The county advisory system is updated each year with key people that know the community and can assess the needs to be addressed. Adjustments and additions are made to programs as needed. In addition to formal feedback, Extension seeks input from its various clientele groups to make programs more responsive to local issues. Methods used to do this include program evaluation surveys, personal contact, and observation. It is our goal to proactively meet the needs of our clientele through user-friendly educational programs.

Health and Nutrition issues that are a concern for Perquimans are: obesity of children and adults, poor diets, lack of health insurance, and issues that pertain specifically to the elderly such as proper medications and proper diet and prevention of diseases. Those identifying agriculture and food supply as a priority voiced concerns about efficiency of production agriculture in the face of soaring input costs, a balance of growth between agricultural lands and residential developments, and the need to preserve water quality. Career Development, community involvement, crime prevention, family communication and childhood health and fitness were topics that 4-H advisory members identified as the area that need to be addressed to promote Leadership, personal development, and citizenship for youth in the county.

In response to concerns about the agricultural/residential interface, Perquimans County adopted a Voluntary Agricultural District ordinance in December 2009. Extension led the way by organizing stakeholders and assisting with development of the ordinance. In 2012, landowners began to register parcels of land in this program.

In addition to the issues that will be routinely addressed, Extension partners with county government and other agencies to impact areas of need that did not arise during the environmental scan process, or were not identified by the advisory system and Extension customers.

III. Objectives to Address the Cooperative Extension Long Range Plan

North Carolina's plant production systems will become more profitable and sustainable.

Value* Outcome Description
510Number of crop (all plant systems) producers increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, and/or skills as related to: 1. Best management production practices (cultural, nutrient, and genetics) 2. Pest/insect, disease, weed, wildlife management 3. Financial/Farm management tools and practices (business, marketing, government policy, human resources) 4. Alternative agriculture, bioenergy, and value-added enterprises
22Number of Extension initiated and controlled County demonstration test sites (new required for GLF/PSI reporting)
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
505Number of crop (all plant systems) producers adopting best management practices, including those practices related to nutrient management, conservation, production, cultivars, pest management (weeds, diseases, insects), business management, and marketing
526948Net income gains realized by the adoption of best management practices, including those practices related to nutrient management, conservation, production, cultivars, pest management (weeds, diseases, insects), business management, and marketing
158Number of producers reporting increased dollar returns per acre or reduced costs per acre
155Number of producers reporting reduction in fertilizer used per acre
60000Number of acres in conservation tillage or other Best Management Practice
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

North Carolina's animal production systems will become more profitable and sustainable.

Value* Outcome Description
121Number of animal producers increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, and/or skills as related to: 1. Best management production practices (cultural, nutrient, and genetics) 2. Pest/insect, disease, weed, wildlife management 3. Financial/Farm management tools and practices (business, marketing, government policy, human resources) 4. Alternative agriculture, bioenergy, and value-added enterprises
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
22Number of animal producers adopting Extension-recommended best management practices, including those practices related to husbandry, improved planning, marketing, and financial practices
132595Net income gains by producers adopting Extension-recommended best management practices, including those practices related to husbandry, improved planning, marketing, and financial practices
18Number of animal producers implementing Extension-recommended best management practices for animal waste management
18Number of waste management certifications gained or maintained due to Extension education efforts
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Agricultural producers, workers, food handlers and consumers will adopt safer food and agricultural production, handling, and distribution practices that reduce workplace and home injuries/illnesses, enhance food security, and increase the quality and safety of food that North Carolinians prepare and consume.

Value* Outcome Description
888Number of commercial/public operators trained
24Number of pesticide application credit hours provided
50Number of persons certified in Pork Quality Assurance (PQA) or Beef Quality Assurance (BQA)
12Number of participants participating in AgriSafe personal protective equipment (PPE) selection or fit testing
5TOTAL number of food handlers receiving food safety training and education in safe food handling practices (new required data for federal reporting)
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
1Number of participants that have adopted farm safety practices
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Individuals and groups will acquire leadership and decision making capacities needed to guide and actively participate in local and state organizations.

Value* Outcome Description
3Number of adults increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
48Number of youth increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
3Number of adults increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
48Number of youth increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Youth and adults will address community issues and/or challenges through volunteerism.

Value* Outcome Description
167Number of adult participants acquiring the skills needed to serve as a volunteer
41Number of youth participants reporting aspirations to serve in new or expanded volunteer roles in community
10Number of adult participants reporting aspirations to serve in new or expanded volunteer roles in community
10Number of hours adult volunteer training conducted
6Number of hours youth volunteer training conducted
7Number new volunteers recruited
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
643Increased number of hours contributed by trained youth volunteers
40Increased number of hours contributed by trained adult volunteers
4Number of adult volunteers serving in new or expanded roles within Extension
3Number of adult volunteers serving in new or expanded roles beyond Extension, including community boards and task forces
2Number of youth volunteers recruiting and/or training new volunteers
5Number of adult volunteers recruiting and/or training new volunteers
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Adults and youth will apply financial management practices to increase their economic security, which include to: meet basic necessities, increase savings, reduce debt, and build long-term assets.

Value* Outcome Description
430Number of people gaining knowledge and/or skills to increase family economic security (such as; how to access: SNAP benefits, SHIIP Medicare Part D; food cost management, cost comparison skills, shop for reverse mortgages, select long term care insurance, etc.)
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Futures that Work: School to Career Pathways

Value* Outcome Description
7Number of teachers trained in 4-H STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) curriculum
125Number of youth (students) increasing knowledge in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math)
59Total number of female participants in STEM program
5Number of high school age youth (students) participating as members of 4-H clubs
215Number of youth (students) increasing knowledge of career/employability skills
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
9Number of teachers using 4-H STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) curriculum in their classrooms
125Number of youth (students) gaining knowledge in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math)
215Number of youth (students) gaining career / employability skills
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Consumers and communities will enhance the value of plants, animals, and landscapes while conserving valuable natural resources and protecting the environment.

Value* Outcome Description
27Number of participants improving knowledge, attitude, skills and aspirations regarding gardening and landscape practices including plant selection and placement, turfgrass management, soil management, growing food, water conservation and water quality preservation, storm water and erosion management, green waste management, pest and wildlife management
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
25Number of participants who use extension-recommended best management practices in landscapes, turf, and gardens, including pest (insect, weed, disease) management, fertility management, water conservation, water quality preservation and pruning techniques
2888Total cost savings from the use of extension-recommended best management practices in landscapes, turf, and gardens, including pest (insect, weed, disease) management, fertility management, water conservation, water quality preservation and pruning techniques
23Number of participants selecting appropriate landscape plants (adapted, drought tolerant, appropriate size, etc.)
3135Cost savings from the appropriate selection of landscape plants
15Number of participants growing food for home consumption
1370Value of produce grown for home consumption
2426Costs savings from implementing extension-recommended practices to conserve water use and protect water qualtiy
22Number of participants implementing extension-recommended practices to conserve water use and protect water qualtiy
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Youth and adult program participants will make healthy food choices, achieve the recommended amount of physical activity and reduce risk factors for chronic diseases.

Value* Impact Description
24Number of adults increasing their fruit and vegetables consumption
148Number of youth increasing their fruit and vegetable consumption
132Number of participants increasing their physical activity
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

IV. Number of Contacts Made by Extension

Type of ContactNumber
Face-to-face* 11,111
Non face-to-face** 25,372
Total by Extension staff in 2018 36,483
* Face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make directly with individuals through one-on-one visits, meetings, and other activities where staff members work directly with individuals.
** Non face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make indirectly with individuals by telephone, email, newsletters, news articles, radio, television, and other means.

V. Designated Grants Received by Extension

Type of GrantAmount
Contracts/Grants $16,310.00
Gifts/Donations $47,998.33
In-Kind Grants/Donations $3,297.50
United Way/Foundations $0.00
User Fees $250.00
Total $67,855.83

VI. Volunteer Involvement in Extension Programs

Number of Volunteers* Number of Volunteer Hours Known client contacts by volunteers Dollar Value at 24.69
4-H: 197 264 1,784 $ 6,518.00
Advisory Leadership System: 0 0 0 $ 0.00
Extension Community Association: 0 0 0 $ 0.00
Extension Master Gardener: 0 0 0 $ 0.00
Other: 165 932 468 $ 23,011.00
Total: 362 1196 2252 $ 29,529.00
* The number of volunteers reflects the overall number of volunteers for multiple events.

VII. Membership of Advisory Leadership System

Advisory Council
A.O. Roberts
Juanita Bailey
Burt Eure
Glenn Harris
Julie Roberts
Lewis Smith
Dottie Wahlers
Linda Layden White
Gene Perry
Frank Heath
Tim Phthisic
Pam Hurdle
Michael Moore
Donald Madre
Jean Oaks
Lee Dail
Dena Richardson
Sue Mitchell
Agricultural Program Committee
Michael Moore
Gene Perry
Donald Madre
Tommy Harrell
Paul Smith
Lewis Smith
Feed Grains and Soybean Specialized Committee
Burt Eure
Rick Strecker
Gene Perry
Marion Godfrey
Cedric Burke
Ricky Stallings
Wayne Rogerson
John Morgan
Paul Smith
Cotton and Peanut Specialized Committee
Robert Phthisic
Ronnie Baker
Julian Baker
Jeff Williams
Walter Cartwright
Edward Winslow
Livestock Program Committee
Fred Smith
Lewis Smith
Richard Lichtenwalner
Perry Eure
Rick Morgan
Jim Russell
Ed Nixon
Jamie Stallings
4-H Livestock Specialized Committee
Jim Russell
Jamie Stallings
Tim Phthisic
Fred Smith
Dena Richardson
Corey Parrish
Lee Dail
Family and Consumer Science Program Committee
Peggy Dudley
Laura Alvarico
Beverly Gregory
Megan Clayton
Joyce Hill
Nelda Stallings
Linda Swain
Linda Bundy
Sue Mitchell
SHIIP Specialized Committee
Nelda Stallings
Laura Alvarico
Delphine Madre
Linda Swain
Beverly Gregory
Faith Mallette
4-H and Youth Program Committee
Linda White
Carla Bundy
Julie Roberts
Brenda Dail
Teresa Beardsley
Laura Moreland
James Bunch
Elizabeth Riddick
Commercial Horticulture Advisory Committee
Louis Nixon
Jeff Smith
Lorne Wiggins
Greg Hughes
Fred Smith
Adam Bunch
Jasper Evans
Forestry Advisory Committee
Scott Sheets
Robbie Umplett
J.R. Rountree
Doug Wassum
James Caddy
Brian Saunders
Matt Lowe
Consumer Horticulture & Extension Master Gardener Advisory Committee
Dotti Morrow
Betty Onufrak
Linda Kreugel
Brenda Atkins
Edna Harvey
Lee Kapleau
Carol Billek
Nancy McGowan
Nancy Dougherty
Micki Levine
Aquaculture Advisory Committee
Jeremy McCargo
Aubry Onley, Jr.
Charles Weirich
Sterling Davenport
Doug Wassum
Gary Sawyer
Craig Perry
Stephen Jackson
Pete Anderson
Harry Daniels
Rob Mayo

VIII. Staff Membership

Jewel Winslow
Title: County Extension Director and Family & Consumer Sciences Agent
Phone: (252) 426-7697
Email: jewel_winslow@ncsu.edu

Nettie Baugher
Title: Area Agent, Agriculture - Commercial Horticulture
Phone: (252) 357-1400
Email: nettie_baugher@ncsu.edu

Patty Bowers
Title: EFNEP Educator, Extension Program Assistant
Phone: (252) 482-6585
Email: patty_bowers@ncsu.edu

Susan Chase
Title: Regional Nutrition Extension Associate - Northeast EFNEP and SNAP-Ed
Phone: (919) 827-2285
Email: susan_chase@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Job Description: Provides programmatic supervision to the EFNEP program in the Northeast District

Candice Christian
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Consumer and Retail Food Safety
Phone: (919) 515-9148
Email: Candice_Christian@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: The overall goal of the Area Specialized Agents (ASAs) in Consumer & Retail Food Safety is to support FCS Agents in delivering timely and evidence-based food safety education and information to stakeholders in North Carolina.

Erin Eure
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Commercial Fruits and Vegetables
Phone: (252) 357-1400
Email: erin_eure@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provides educational opportunities and technical support to commercial fruit and vegetable growers, agents, and industry in northeastern NC.

Steve Gabel
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Aquaculture
Phone: (252) 482-6585
Email: steve_gabel@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Responsible for aquaculture educational programs for the NC NE extension district.

Risha Griffin
Title: County Extension Support Specialist
Phone: (252) 426-7697
Email: risha_foreman@ncsu.edu

Jared Harrell
Title: Area Agent, Agriculture - Livestock
Phone: (252) 426-5428
Email: jared_harrell@ncsu.edu

Marissa Herchler
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Animal Food Safety (FSMA Programs)
Phone: (919) 515-5396
Email: marissa_herchler@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Marissa is an Area Specialized Agent for animal food safety, with emphasis on the new Food Safety Modernization Act rules, as they apply to feed mills in North Carolina. Please contact Marissa with any FSMA related questions, or PCQI training inquiries.

Lynette Johnston
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Food Safety
Phone: (919) 515-0303
Email: lynette_johnston@ncsu.edu

Danny Lauderdale
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Nursery and Greenhouse, Eastern Region
Phone: (252) 237-0111
Email: danny_lauderdale@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provides programming to commercial ornamental nursery and greenhouse producers in eastern North Carolina.

Dylan Lilley
Title: Extension Agent, Agriculture - Field Crops
Phone: (252) 426-5428
Email: dylan_lilley@ncsu.edu

Bill Lord
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Water Resources
Phone: (919) 496-3344
Email: william_lord@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Water quality education and technical assistance

Margaret Ross
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Poultry
Phone: (252) 670-8254
Email: margaret_ross@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Working with commercial poultry producers to assist in writing nutrient management plans and conducting educational programming.

Katy Shook
Title: Area Agent, Agriculture - Consumer Horticulture
Phone: (252) 482-6585
Email: katy_shook@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Chowan, Gates & Perquimans County Consumer Horticulture Agent & Extension Master Gardener Coordinator

Chip Simmons
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Food Safety
Phone: (919) 414-5632
Email: odsimmon@ncsu.edu

Teresa Story
Title: County Extension Administrative Assistant
Phone: (252) 426-5428
Email: teresa_story@ncsu.edu

Scott Tilley
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Field Crops
Phone: (252) 793-4428
Email: scott_tilley@ncsu.edu

Meredith Wood
Title: Extension Agent, 4-H Youth Development
Phone: (252) 426-7697
Email: meredith_wood@ncsu.edu

Mitch Woodward
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Watersheds and Water Quality
Phone: (919) 250-1112
Email: mdwoodwa@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: NC Cooperative Extension's Goals include: - NC's natural resources and environmental quality will be protected, conserved and enhanced. - NC will have profitable, environmentally sustainable plant, animal and food systems. Protecting our environmental resources, particularly drinking water quality, is a top priority in NC. NC Cooperative Extension is a leader in teaching, researching, and accelerating the adoption of effective water quality protection practices.

IX. Contact Information

Perquimans County Center
601-A S Edenton Road St
Hertford, NC 27944

Phone: (252) 426-5428
Fax: (252) 426-1646
URL: http://perquimans.ces.ncsu.edu