2018 Pitt County Program Impact Report

Approved: January 23, 2019

I. Executive Summary

The Pitt County team of NC Cooperative Extension works to meet the needs of North Carolina’s fourteenth most populated county. Pitt is twelfth among North Carolina’s counties in the value of its agricultural products at over $202 million (4th in peanut production, 7th soybeans, 8th tobacco, 10th hogs, 11th corn). According to Feeding America’s 2016 study, 20.8% of Pitt County’s residents are food insecure, and 8,740 have an income too high to qualify for many food assistance programs. The NC County Health Rankings report that Pitt was fifty-eighth in health outcomes. Pitt County has an impressive agriculture base and a growing population pressuring this historically rural community to meet changing needs.

One agent focused on livestock and forages. Seventy-two producers implemented best practices and increased their net income by $21,090. Extension assisted 44 livestock producers with animal waste management, positively impacting natural resources. Three hundred thousand tons of organic livestock by-products were used. Extension’s recommend waste application was properly used on 1,831 acres. Using livestock by-products instead of synthetic fertilizer saved $650,000. Thirty-nine producers earned/maintained waste management certificates, a requirement for the livestock workforce.

Pitt was without a crops agent in 2018, and the livestock and horticulture agents impacted 253 crop producers who increased their knowledge of best practices in crop production. Pitt County and NCSU approved funding for a full-time crops agent in the 2018-19 budget, and she began January 2, 2019.

The consumer and commercial horticulture agent impacted 631 participants who implemented best practice recommendations in landscaping, turf and gardening, saving $600,000 by adopting best practices in horticulture techniques, water and fertility management. Three hundred participants used best practices in pest management resulting in $100,000 cost savings. Choosing the appropriate landscaping plants saved consumers $95,000. The agent managed the Master Gardener Volunteers who maintained the Pitt County Arboretum and provided educational programming throughout the county.

Three hundred producers gained knowledge to increase their production for local markets. Pitt County agents, cooperating with agents in neighboring counties, hosted NC Farm School Down East training 30 beginning farmers who will add to the local agriculture economy. The horticulture agent served as the county’s pesticide coordinator and provided 93 hours or pesticide application credit hours, a necessity for the landscaping and agriculture workforce. The agent was instrumental in establishing a new strawberry operation, increasing agriculture tourism and fresh produce availability.

The horticulture agent, Extension director, community garden coordinator and the local food coordinator (both part time and grant funded) supported local food system programming and development. Their combined efforts impacted 701 youth with an increase in agricultural knowledge. The Pitt County Farm and Food Council developed the Food for Pitt website and phone app where users can locate food and nutrition resources in Pitt County. Along with the Leroy James Farmers Market manager, this local food team developed the G Circle Market, located at the health department/human services complex and marketed to county employees and clients.

Cooperative Extension had 1 Extension agent and 1 program assistant focused on the 4-H Youth Development Program. Their work focused on STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) education for youth.
Nine hundred youth gained STEM knowledge, and 45 teachers used 4-H STEM in their classrooms. 4-H reached 607 at risk students with career/employability skills. Twenty-six youth expanded their volunteer service, and 47 new 4-H volunteers were recruited. The Lamb and Goat Camp, Down East Dairy Project and the new Farm to Fork camp were extremely successful.


NC Cooperative Extension had 1 program assistant educating children about nutrition, physical activity and resource management through EFNEP (Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program). Pitt County and NCSU funded a family and consumer sciences agent who began work in September 2018.

Cooperative Extension volunteers impacted the community beyond the reach of the Extension staff. Through Cooperative Extension, 2,691 volunteers gave 25,565 hours of service to Pitt County which is valued at $631,200. Volunteers served as 4-H volunteers, Extension and Community Association volunteers, Extension Master Gardeners, Tar River Beekeepers, Making Pitt Fit Community Garden volunteers, the Pitt County Farm and Food Council and Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program volunteers.

II. County Background

With a rich agriculture history, Pitt County is a now a mostly urban county. While thirteenth in state for the value of agriculture products ($215 million), it is also the fourteenth most populated county. There are ten incorporated municipalities. Greenville is home to Vidant Medical Center and East Carolina University, the third largest and fastest growing university statewide. Pitt County has the largest concentration of population and industry in north eastern North Carolina. Over one-half million people live within a 45-mile radius of the county.

Currently, there are 171,821 acres of farmland; the average farm has 439 acres. Pitt is in the top eight North Carolina counties for production of tobacco, cotton, soybeans,peanuts and wheat. Pitt is eleventh in hog and pig production. Of the $215 million in agriculture market value, 52% is attributed to crops and 48% to livestock. Vegetable production is valued at approximately $1.8 million.

There are growing pressures on rural land for development. In addition, a growing and diverse urban population has demands for an increase in healthy food. Approximately 21% of county residents experience food insecurity, and of those 23% are above the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program guidelines.

Key leaders of Pitt County and customers of the Pitt County Extension program were involved in the process of identifying the top issues and needs of the county. Conversations, focus groups and evaluations from stakeholders were the primary methods used to identify issues impacting the county's quality of life. The following focus areas were identified:

* Agriculture Productivity and Sustainability including traditional row crops, produce, livestock and the green industry
* Environmental Stewardship
* Youth Leadership Development
* STEM Education
* Nutrition Education
* Local Food Systems and Food Insecurity

NC Cooperative Extension in Pitt County is addressing these areas through our programming in 4-H Youth Development, Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program, and Agriculture. Our work in community gardens, arboretum education and the Pitt County Farm and Food Council are important to meeting these areas of need.

III. Objectives to Address the Cooperative Extension Long Range Plan

North Carolina's plant production systems will become more profitable and sustainable.

Value* Outcome Description
253Number of crop (all plant systems) producers increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, and/or skills as related to: 1. Best management production practices (cultural, nutrient, and genetics) 2. Pest/insect, disease, weed, wildlife management 3. Financial/Farm management tools and practices (business, marketing, government policy, human resources) 4. Alternative agriculture, bioenergy, and value-added enterprises
1Number of Extension initiated and controlled County demonstration test sites (new required for GLF/PSI reporting)
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
169Number of crop (all plant systems) producers adopting best management practices, including those practices related to nutrient management, conservation, production, cultivars, pest management (weeds, diseases, insects), business management, and marketing
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Community members, organizations and local government will engage in collaborative dialog and decision-making to build economically, socially and environmentally resilient communities. This will be done through inclusive engagement, partnership building, and/or community planning.

Value* Outcome Description
25Number of participants increasing knowledge and skills in convening and leading inclusive, representative groups (including limited resources, new resident, or immigrant groups) for evidence based community development
75Number of participants developing skills in leading community, economic, and/or disaster planning and change
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
1Number of local food councils in which Extension is involved
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

North Carolina's animal production systems will become more profitable and sustainable.

Value* Outcome Description
81Number of animal producers increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, and/or skills as related to: 1. Best management production practices (cultural, nutrient, and genetics) 2. Pest/insect, disease, weed, wildlife management 3. Financial/Farm management tools and practices (business, marketing, government policy, human resources) 4. Alternative agriculture, bioenergy, and value-added enterprises
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
72Number of animal producers adopting Extension-recommended best management practices, including those practices related to husbandry, improved planning, marketing, and financial practices
21090Net income gains by producers adopting Extension-recommended best management practices, including those practices related to husbandry, improved planning, marketing, and financial practices
44Number of animal producers implementing Extension-recommended best management practices for animal waste management
300000Tons of livestock organic by-products utilized (nutrients from waste, compost, etc)
650000Net income gain by using livestock organic by-products instead of synthetic fertilizers
39Number of waste management certifications gained or maintained due to Extension education efforts
1831Number of acres where Extension-recommended waste analysis was used for proper land application
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Producers will increase sales of food locally to more agriculturally aware consumers through market development, producer and consumer education, and new farmer and infrastructure support.

Value* Outcome Description
305Number of producers who gain skills or knowledge to increase production for local markets.
259Number of adults (including producers, food business owners, etc.) who improved knowledge of local food and agricultural systems.
4256Number of children/youth who improved knowledge of local food and agricultural systems.
284Number of individuals who gain knowledge or acquire skills related to vegetable/fruit gardening, and if also reporting under Urban and Consumer Agriculture Objective, divide up the reported number appropriately between the two objectives to avoid duplication.
57Number of producers who improve local food marketing skills or knowledge.
20Number of individuals who learn how to prepare local foods, including through use of home food preservation techniques.
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
3Number of new and existing access points for consumers that expand or improve their offering of local fruits and vegetables. Access points include farmers markets, retail stores, school food programs, community gardens, institutions other than schools (e.g. hospitals, universities, etc.), and other systems/access points not noted (e.g. restaurants, etc.).
6Number of producers who diversified their marketing strategies into local markets (direct, intermediated/food service, institutional).
30Number of new farms (beginning farmers) selling into local markets for local consumption (in this reporting period).
80Number of individuals who grow food in community gardens.
37Number of youth who grow food in school gardens.
25Number of individuals who begin home food production by starting a vegetable and/or fruit garden, and if also reporting under Urban and Consumer Horticulture Objective, divide up the reported number appropriately between the two objectives to avoid duplication.
8Number of individuals who begin home food production by starting to raise backyard livestock.
1275Number of pounds of fresh produce donated for consumption by vulnerable populations.
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Agricultural producers, workers, food handlers and consumers will adopt safer food and agricultural production, handling, and distribution practices that reduce workplace and home injuries/illnesses, enhance food security, and increase the quality and safety of food that North Carolinians prepare and consume.

Value* Outcome Description
93Number of pesticide application credit hours provided
442Number of participants trained in safe home food handling, preservation, or preparation practices
22Number of participants trained in Good Farmers Market Practices
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Individuals and groups will acquire leadership and decision making capacities needed to guide and actively participate in local and state organizations.

Value* Outcome Description
101Number of adults increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
35Number of adults assuming new/expanded leadership roles in the community
325Number of youth increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
347Number of youth assuming new/expanded leadership roles in the community
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
191Number of adults increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
191Number of adults assuming new/expanded leadership roles in the community
250Number of youth increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
26Number of youth assuming new/expanded leadership roles in the community
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Youth and adults will address community issues and/or challenges through volunteerism.

Value* Outcome Description
15Number of adult participants acquiring the skills needed to serve as a volunteer
12Number of adult participants reporting aspirations to serve in new or expanded volunteer roles in community
2Number of hours adult volunteer training conducted
47Number new volunteers recruited
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
126Increased number of hours contributed by trained youth volunteers
273Increased number of hours contributed by trained adult volunteers
64Number of adult volunteers recruiting and/or training new volunteers
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Futures that Work: School to Career Pathways

Value* Outcome Description
23Number of teachers trained in 4-H STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) curriculum
757Number of youth (students) increasing knowledge in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math)
243Total number of female participants in STEM program
607Number of youth (students) participating in 4-H dropout prevention (student at-risk) programs
125Number of high school age youth (students) participating as members of 4-H clubs
607Number of youth (students) increasing knowledge of career/employability skills
191Number of adults increasing knowledge of career/employability skills
200Number of youth (students) increasing knowledge of entrepreneurship
60Number of adults increasing knowledge of entrepreneurship
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
45Number of teachers using 4-H STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) curriculum in their classrooms
912Number of youth (students) gaining knowledge in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math)
25Number of youth (students) gaining career / employability skills
191Number of adults gaining career / employability skills
35Number of youth (students) gaining entrepreneurship skills
60Number of adults gaining entrepreneurship skills
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

North Carolinians will make decisions and adopt practices that implement effective resource protection and conservation.

Value* Outcome Description
20Number of youth willing to participate in conservation actions
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
22Number of participants that adopted recommended climate adaption strategies for production agriculture or natural resource management, including for invasive species, pest management, pollutant loads, and wetlands.
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Consumers and communities will enhance the value of plants, animals, and landscapes while conserving valuable natural resources and protecting the environment.

Value* Outcome Description
761Number of participants improving knowledge, attitude, skills and aspirations regarding gardening and landscape practices including plant selection and placement, turfgrass management, soil management, growing food, water conservation and water quality preservation, storm water and erosion management, green waste management, pest and wildlife management
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
631Number of participants who use extension-recommended best management practices in landscapes, turf, and gardens, including pest (insect, weed, disease) management, fertility management, water conservation, water quality preservation and pruning techniques
600000Total cost savings from the use of extension-recommended best management practices in landscapes, turf, and gardens, including pest (insect, weed, disease) management, fertility management, water conservation, water quality preservation and pruning techniques
300Number of participants who use extension-recommended pest management practices in homes, public facilities, businesses or in community pest management programs
100000Cost savings from using extension-recommended pest management practices in homes, public facilities, businesses or in community pest management programs
175Number of participants selecting appropriate landscape plants (adapted, drought tolerant, appropriate size, etc.)
95000Cost savings from the appropriate selection of landscape plants
50Number of participants growing food for home consumption
15000Value of produce grown for home consumption
35Number of participants adopting composting
25Number of participants implementing extension-recommended practices to conserve water use and protect water qualty
25Costs savings from implementing extension-recommended practices to conserve water use and protect water qualtiy
25Number of participants implementing extension-recommended practices to conserve water use and protect water qualtiy
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Youth and adult program participants will make healthy food choices, achieve the recommended amount of physical activity and reduce risk factors for chronic diseases.

Value* Impact Description
125Number of adults increasing their fruit and vegetables consumption
641Number of youth increasing their fruit and vegetable consumption
322Number of participants increasing their physical activity
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

IV. Number of Contacts Made by Extension

Type of ContactNumber
Face-to-face* 22,018
Non face-to-face** 6,637
Total by Extension staff in 2018 28,655
* Face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make directly with individuals through one-on-one visits, meetings, and other activities where staff members work directly with individuals.
** Non face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make indirectly with individuals by telephone, email, newsletters, news articles, radio, television, and other means.

V. Designated Grants Received by Extension

Type of GrantAmount
Contracts/Grants $97,500.00
Gifts/Donations $2,600.00
In-Kind Grants/Donations $1,000.00
United Way/Foundations $0.00
User Fees $6,585.00
Total $107,685.00

VI. Volunteer Involvement in Extension Programs

Number of Volunteers* Number of Volunteer Hours Known client contacts by volunteers Dollar Value at 25.43
4-H: 1,700 5,993 12 $ 152,402.00
Advisory Leadership System: 0 0 0 $ 0.00
Extension Community Association: 14 14,019 0 $ 356,503.00
Extension Master Gardener: 800 3,465 398 $ 88,115.00
Other: 515 2,088 630 $ 53,098.00
Total: 3029 25565 1040 $ 650,118.00
* The number of volunteers reflects the overall number of volunteers for multiple events.

VII. Membership of Advisory Leadership System

Pitt County Advisory Council
Jackie Sugg
Juvencio Rocha Peralta
Lena Darden
Alice Keene
Kahla Hall
Robin Tant
Juanita Nobles
Steve Sutton
James Rhodes




Tobacco Advisory Committee
L.F. Worthington
Lawrence Davenport
Gordon Johnson


4-H County Advisory Council
Jennifer Christensen
Vicki Bergstedt
Mildred Council
Tammy Moore
Jessica Henderson
Caroline Davenport
Jerry Flanagan
Heidi Kitrell
Leigh Lawrence
Miriam Lewis
Tracy Stead
David Ward
Allison Wasklewicz
Trish Douglas
Jo Ann Harkley
Melinda Fagundus
Amy Stevenson
Mandy Waugh
Lisa Martin
Dorothy Suedbeck
4-H County Council
Hannah Cooke
Cassandra Suedbeck
Marisa Suedbeck
Sarah Cooke
Commercial Horticulture/Landscape Advisory Committee
Glenn Bright
Tod Williams
Kevin Heifferon
John Gill
Steven Jones
Andrea Pike
David Rouse
Mike Skinner
Ken Stillwell
Mike Worthington
Tod Worthington
Consumer Horticulture and Arboretum Advisory Committee
Rosanne Davis
Jeannette Debs
Doug Grimes
Ann Hamze
Joanne Kollar
Blythe Tennent
John Weber
Holly Wilson



Joanne Kollar
Lynne Maclaga
Pam Mastin
Vicki Morris
Jack Overton
Susan Purcell
Teresa Surratt
Carol Taylor
Martha Watson
Maxyne Weaver
Livestock Advisory Committee
Jerry Flanagan
Allen Corbitt
Chad Smith
Greg Foster
Billy Lewis
June Haddock
Chris Cox
Channing Armstrong


Youth Livestock Advisory Committee
Miriam Lewis
Brittany Roy
Jessica Henderson
Justin Lawrence
Will Hargett
Danielle Henderson
Kim Gaylord
Chris Stancil
Maureen Grady
Feedgrains and Cotton Advisory Committee
Robert Cannon
Clevie Averette
David Sawyer
Carl Briley
Tim Whitehurst
Taylor Barnhill
Edward Lee
Allen Warren
Henry Bunn
Steve Sutton
Greg James
Will Congleton
Peanut Advisory Committee
Charles Tucker
Charles Rogister
Lawrence Davenport
Tod Sugg
Carl Crawford
Bee Keeping Advisory Committee
Jerry Flanagan
Kristen Lewis
Dale Aycock
Shelly Cooper
Tim Siders
Murdock Butler
Lester Poppe
Farmers Market
Bobby Yates
Mike Skinner
Wilbert Futrell
Pitt County Farm and Food Council
Billy Tarlton
Derrick Boyce
Carlton Gay
Christal Andrews
Eulalia Williams
Gloristine Brown
Kahla Hall
Mike Skinner
John Morrow
James Rhodes
Steve Farnau
Susan Boutilier

VIII. Staff Membership

Leigh Guth
Title: County Extension Director
Phone: (252) 902-1700
Email: Leigh_Guth@ncsu.edu

Taneisha Armstrong
Title: Extension Agent, Family and Consumer Sciences
Phone: (252) 902-1714
Email: taneisha_armstrong@ncsu.edu

Marian Booth
Title: 4-H Program Associate
Phone: (252) 902-1711
Email: marian_booth@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Marian's responsibility is teaching life skills for youth programming.

Andy Burlingham
Title: Extension Agent, Agriculture - Livestock
Phone: (252) 902-1703
Email: andy_burlingham@ncsu.edu

Susan Chase
Title: Regional Nutrition Extension Associate - Northeast EFNEP and SNAP-Ed
Phone: (919) 827-2285
Email: susan_chase@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Job Description: Provides programmatic supervision to the EFNEP program in the Northeast District

Candice Christian
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Consumer and Retail Food Safety
Phone: (919) 515-9148
Email: Candice_Christian@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: The overall goal of the Area Specialized Agents (ASAs) in Consumer & Retail Food Safety is to support FCS Agents in delivering timely and evidence-based food safety education and information to stakeholders in North Carolina.

Lauren Dail
Title: Extension Agent, 4-H Youth Development
Phone: (252) 902-1712
Email: lsdail2@ncsu.edu

Erin Eure
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Commercial Fruits and Vegetables
Phone: (252) 357-1400
Email: erin_eure@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provides educational opportunities and technical support to commercial fruit and vegetable growers, agents, and industry in northeastern NC.

Steve Gabel
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Aquaculture
Phone: (252) 482-6585
Email: steve_gabel@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Responsible for aquaculture educational programs for the NC NE extension district.

Marissa Herchler
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Animal Food Safety (FSMA Programs)
Phone: (919) 515-5396
Email: marissa_herchler@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Marissa is an Area Specialized Agent for animal food safety, with emphasis on the new Food Safety Modernization Act rules, as they apply to feed mills in North Carolina. Please contact Marissa with any FSMA related questions, or PCQI training inquiries.

Lynette Johnston
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Food Safety
Phone: (919) 515-0303
Email: lynette_johnston@ncsu.edu

Colby Lambert
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Forestry
Phone: (910) 814-6041
Email: colby_lambert@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provides educational opportunities and technical support to forest landowners, agents, and forest industry in eastern North Carolina.

Danny Lauderdale
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Nursery and Greenhouse, Eastern Region
Phone: (252) 237-0111
Email: danny_lauderdale@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provides programming to commercial ornamental nursery and greenhouse producers in eastern North Carolina.

Bill Lord
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Water Resources
Phone: (919) 496-3344
Email: william_lord@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Water quality education and technical assistance

Lori McBryde
Title: Area 4-H Agent, East Region
Phone: (919) 989-5380
Email: lori_mcbryde@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provide support the Eastern 34 Counties of the Northeast and Southeast Districts in 4-H Youth Development.

Carrie Ortel
Title: Extension Agent, Agriculture - Field Crops
Phone: (252) 902-1704
Email: ccortel@ncsu.edu

Brigitte Perry
Title: County Extension Administrative Assistant
Phone: (252) 902-1709
Email: brperry@ncsu.edu

Makeema Ross
Title: Youth EFNEP Educator
Phone: (252) 902-1719
Email: mmross2@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Nutrition Education

Margaret Ross
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Poultry
Phone: (252) 670-8254
Email: margaret_ross@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Working with commercial poultry producers to assist in writing nutrient management plans and conducting educational programming.

Chip Simmons
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Food Safety
Phone: (919) 414-5632
Email: odsimmon@ncsu.edu

Hannah Smith
Title: Extension Agent, Agriculture - Horticulture
Phone: (252) 902-1701
Email: hannah_smith@ncsu.edu

Scott Tilley
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Field Crops
Phone: (252) 793-4428
Email: scott_tilley@ncsu.edu

Joni Torres
Title: Community Garden Technician, Agriculture - Community Garden
Phone: (252) 902-1756
Email: joni_torres@ncsu.edu

Mitch Woodward
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Watersheds and Water Quality
Phone: (919) 250-1112
Email: mdwoodwa@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: NC Cooperative Extension's Goals include: - NC's natural resources and environmental quality will be protected, conserved and enhanced. - NC will have profitable, environmentally sustainable plant, animal and food systems. Protecting our environmental resources, particularly drinking water quality, is a top priority in NC. NC Cooperative Extension is a leader in teaching, researching, and accelerating the adoption of effective water quality protection practices.

IX. Contact Information

Pitt County Center
403 Government Cir
Suite 2
Greenville, NC 27834

Phone: (252) 902-1700
Fax: (252) 757-1456
URL: http://pitt.ces.ncsu.edu