2019 Richmond County Program Impact Report

Approved: January 24, 2020

I. Executive Summary

In 2019, the Richmond County Center provided high-quality educational resources to clientele in the areas of agriculture, nutrition, and youth development. Extension Agents worked to support the annual budget by acquiring additional fiscal resources amounting to $47,376.94 in grants, donations, and in-kind support. Volunteers assisted agents by working 651 hours at a value of $16,554 (using $25.43 estimate per hour). During 2019, 30 industry certifications were achieved or renewed, including 6 Animal Waste Operators and 24 Pesticide Applicators.

In the area of Animal Production Systems, 81 animal producers increased or improved knowledge developing a management plan (such as a grazing plan) and increased knowledge of pasture/forage management (through field improvement, herbicide management, nitrate testing, etc.). 600 acres in the county are now managed with Extension-recommended nutrient applications, helping to ensure that surface and groundwater quality is protected. 57 producers reported increased revenue through the local food supply chain.

The Horticulture agent, working in the objectives of Plant Production Systems, Food Safety and Nutrition, and Consumer Horticulture, reached over 700 individuals through programs, meetings, workshops, and other face to face learning opportunities, enabling individuals to gain knowledge in new produce markets, food safety production practices, pesticide safety, and improved homeowner garden and lawn care.

In the area of 4-H Youth Development, the 4-H agent reached over 1800 youth to increase knowledge of STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) education for county youth, with over half of that number being female. Programs such as Science Adventures hosted at Camp Millstone and organized by the 4-H agent, increased youth knowledge of natural resources and environmental issues. Science Adventures is a partnership with agencies such as the NC Forest Service, Soil and Water, NC Wildlife Commission and others, where all county 5th graders spend a day learning about natural resources and science. The Embryology Program, through which county third-graders observe the hatching of baby chicks in their classroom’s own incubator, provides youth with the opportunity to learn about animal development and hygiene. Over 600 youth gained career/employability skills, with 12 receiving certificates in babysitting programming, through 4-H programs. Almost 150 youth increased physical activity and almost 300 increased their fruit and vegetable production, which leads to health improvements. These programs and others provided hands-on learning opportunities to the students and youth of Richmond County.

The Family Consumer Science agent programs helped Richmond County citizens learn more about healthy eating (including reducing sodium in the diet), safe home food handling and preparation, stress management and the importance of self-care. Youth learned about the tasty and healthful options to sugary soft drinks, the value of regular physical exercise, and the importance of food safety and hygiene to prevent possible contamination and illness. The FCS Agent and 4-H Agent joined forces to provide the Empowering Youth and Families Program, a pilot program of NC State University, to promote healthy families and opioid prevention. The program focused on working with families to improve understanding and communication to help prevent problems in the future that could lead to opioid use.

In all, 12,110 citizens received direct educational services from Richmond County Extension in the form of farm visits, demonstrations, field days, tours, shows, classes, workshops, and meetings. Another 3,574 contacts were made by telephone, email, and mail for a total of 15,684 clientele contacts. Extension Agents also produced informational materials including numerous newspaper articles and newsletters, social media and web-based communications to convey research-based information even more broadly throughout the county.

II. County Background

Richmond County is uniquely located in the heartland of the Carolinas with easy access to Raleigh, Charlotte, Fayetteville, and Greensboro. Richmond County is the home of an estimated 44,939 citizens composed of 62% Caucasian, 31% African American, 1% Asian, 6% Hispanic or Latino and 3% American Indian according to the most recent U.S. Census Bureau information. The population has been on a decreasing trend, losing 3.6% between 2010 and 2016. The land area of Richmond County is 474.55 square miles.

According to the 2016 U.S. Census Bureau, 24.9% of the population lives below the poverty level. In addition, the per capita income is $19,411 far below the North Carolina per capita income of $28,156. Unemployment, severely affected by the decline in textiles, continues to be above state (4.5%) and national (4.1%) averages at 6.1 % according to November 2017 figures released by the Employment Security Commission of North Carolina. The projected population growth for Richmond County is 0% by 2019.

Previously the largest industry in the county was textiles, and now poultry processing makes up a substantial part of the local industry. Perdue Farms, with over 1000 workers, is the County’s largest private employer. There are an estimated 36 million broilers produced each year in poultry houses in Richmond County, ranked #7 in North Carolina in poultry production. There are also 61,000 hogs grown in the county (state rank 22), combining with cattle, goats, and poultry making Richmond ranked #11 in livestock production in the state. The county used to have a greater presence in fruit and vegetable production, especially peaches, however in recent years producers have dropped out of produce for various reasons.

The annual Plan of Work is based on the needs of the Richmond County citizens. The needs were identified by collecting statistical data such as the US Census and the Community Health Assessment. Each program area Advisory Council provides expert and community input into program decision-making. The objectives for 2019 were selected based on this input and Richmond County participated in the collection of data for the state-wide Extension Needs Assessment.

The needs of Richmond County citizens have been identified and the staff will rely on the leadership of the specialized committees to help identify and reach the target audiences; develop programming strategies; market the educational programs; and in some cases, evaluate the effectiveness of the programs. Agents will reach the identified audiences through face-to-face visits, educational workshops, and media.

III. Objectives to Address the Cooperative Extension Long Range Plan

Our family and consumer sciences programs improve the well-being of individuals, families, and communities.

Value* Outcome Description
6Number of adults increasing knowledge of life skills (such as goal setting, stress management, self-care and healthy relationships)
8Number of adults increasing their knowledge of community resources
2Number of parents and other caregivers of children increasing their knowledge of positive parenting practices (such as communication and discipline)
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
6Number of adults using effective life skills (such as goal setting, stress management, self-care and healthy relationships)
2Number of parents/other caregivers of children adopting positive parenting practices (such as communication and discipline)
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Our plant production programs improve production, profitability, and sustainability of the agriculture sector.

Value* Outcome Description
57Number of producers who gain skills or knowledge to increase production for local markets.
679Number of crop (all plant systems) producers increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, and/or skills as related to: 1. Best management production practices (cultural, nutrient, and genetics) 2. Pest/insect, disease, weed, wildlife management 3. Financial/Farm management tools and practices (business, marketing, government policy, human resources) 4. Alternative agriculture, bioenergy, and value-added enterprises
1Number of Extension initiated and controlled county demonstration test sites
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
1Number of producers who diversified their marketing strategies into local markets (direct, intermediated/food service, institutional).
1Number of crop (all plant systems) producers adopting best management practices, including those practices related to nutrient management, conservation, production, cultivars, pest management (weeds, diseases, insects), business management, and marketing
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Our animal production programs improve production, profitability, and sustainability of the agriculture sector.

Value* Outcome Description
57Number of producers who improve local food marketing skills or knowledge.
57Number of producers who gain skills or knowledge to increase production for local markets.
16Number of animal producers who increased knowledge of farm business management, business planning, financial management, marketing, or estate planning.
81Number of animal producers who learned how to develop a management plan (i.e. grazing plan, feeding plan, drought plan, business plan, disaster plan, etc.)
81Number of producers who increased knowledge of pasture/forage management practices (field improvement, herbicide management, grazing season extension, weed control, forage quality, haylage production, nitrate testing, etc.)
81Number of producers who increased knowledge of nutrition, ration balancing, mineral supplements, breeding, and reproduction
81Number of producers who increased knowledge of the strategies to promote animal health and welfare and reduce the potential for infectious diseases through proper use of vaccines, biosecurity, detection and identification of common diseases, appropriate use of animal medications, and mitigation of antimicrobial resistance transmission
36Number of producers who increased knowledge of animal waste management practices
8Number of Extension conducted on-site sludge surveys or equipment calibrations
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
1Number of producers who diversified their marketing strategies into local markets (direct, intermediated/food service, institutional).
1Number of new farms (beginning farmers) selling into local markets for local consumption (in this reporting period)
57Number of producers (and other members of the local food supply chain) who have increased revenue
37Number of participants that have adopted farm safety practices
56Number of farmers, employees or family members adopting regular use of appropriate PPE following AgriSafe or Certified Safe Farm participation
57Number of producers adopting extension-recommended practices related to planning, marketing, and financial management
36Number of producers implementing Extension-recommended best management practices for animal waste management
600Number of acres where Extension-recommended nutrient applications were used
3Number of producers who adopted Extension-recommended best management practices and production changes related to quality assurance (vaccinations, castration, culling techniques, etc.)
1Number of producers who adopted Extension-recommended best management practices and production changes related to genetic improvement (AI, heifer/bull selection)
45Number of producers who adopted Extension-recommended best management practices and production changes related to nutrition (mineral, feed rations)
40Number of producers who adopted Extension-recommended best management practices and production changes related to internal parasite management (fecals, deworming)
45Number of producers who adopted Extension-recommended best management practices related to pasture management
40Number of producers who adopted Extension-recommended best management practices and production changes related to nutrition, ration balancing, mineral supplement, breeding, and reproduction
36Number of producers using improved biosecurity practices
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Our 4-H youth development programs grow the skills young people need to succeed in life and career.

Value* Outcome Description
65Number of teachers trained in 4-H STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) curriculum
1823Number of youth (students) increasing knowledge in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math)
1001Total number of female participants in STEM program
30Number of youth (students) participating in 4-H dropout prevention (student at-risk) programs
12Number of high school age youth (students) participating as members of 4-H clubs
2163Number of youth increasing knowledge of life skills
1033Number of children/youth who improved knowledge of local food and agricultural systems.
869Number of youth increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
1588Number of youth demonstrating increased knowledge of natural resources and environmental issues
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
62Number of teachers using 4-H STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) curriculum in their classrooms
694Number of youth (students) gaining career / employability skills
65Number of youth using effective life skills
752Number of youth willing to participate in conservation actions
147Number of youth increasing their physical activity
270Number of youth increasing their fruit and vegetable consumption
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

IV. Number of Contacts Made by Extension

Type of ContactNumber
Face-to-face* 12,110
Non face-to-face** 607,255
Total by Extension staff in 2019 619,365
* Face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make directly with individuals through one-on-one visits, meetings, and other activities where staff members work directly with individuals.
** Non face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make indirectly with individuals by telephone, email, newsletters, news articles, radio, television, and other means.

V. Designated Grants Received by Extension

Type of GrantAmount
Contracts/Grants $36,236.94
Gifts/Donations $3,640.00
In-Kind Grants/Donations $0.00
United Way/Foundations $7,500.00
User Fees $0.00
Total $47,376.94

VI. Volunteer Involvement in Extension Programs

Number of Volunteers* Number of Volunteer Hours Known client contacts by volunteers Dollar Value at 25.43
4-H 272 636 3420 $ 16,173.00
Advisory Leadership System 3 8 100 $ 203.00
Other: Agriculture 21 3 0 $ 76.00
Other: Forestry & Natural Resources 4 4 40 $ 102.00
Total: 300 651 3560 $ 16,555.00
* The number of volunteers reflects the overall number of volunteers for multiple events.

VII. Membership of Advisory Leadership System

Extension Advisory Council
Tommy Deese, Sr.
Rickie DeWitt
Carlotta Knotts
Lee Anne Sago
Betty Wilson
Don Bryant
Mamie Legrand
Chad Guinn
Donnie Richardson
Keith Russell
Chris Yaklin
Seth Allen
Dennis Holloway
Jack Lee
Michelle Parrish
John Matheson
4-H Advisory Committee
Cameron Whitley
Jean Fletcher
Amanda Smith
Dr. Carlotta Knotts
Jamie Gerald
Valarie Nichols
Lavonda Jones
Jackie McAuley
Annie Freeman
Sharon Johnson
Horticulture Advisory Committee
Jeff Joyner
Don Bryant
Chad Guinn
Arthur Lockhart
Davon Goodwin
Nora Hudson
Livestock Advisory Committee
John McInnis
Pam Park
Matthieu Quick
Bryan Wilson
Chris Yaklin
Amy Yaklin
Cheryl Johnson
Family and Consumer Sciences - Moore and Richmond Counties
Jessica Ledbetter
Barbara Chope
Nancy Porter
Kirsten Cook
Michelle Cole
Kelly Godwin
Melissa Herman
Jacqueline Welch
Deon Allbrooks (Aaron)
Casey Saunders
Matt Garner
Carol Barbera
Doretta Wright

VIII. Staff Membership

Paige Burns
Title: County Extension Director & Extension Agent, Agriculture - Horticulture
Phone: (910) 997-8255
Email: paige_burns@ncsu.edu

Carol Capel-Baldwin
Title: County Extension Administrative Assistant
Phone: (910) 997-8255
Email: carol_capel@ncsu.edu

Jenny Carleo
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Grain Crops
Phone: (704) 873-0507
Email: jscarleo@ncsu.edu

Candice Christian
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Consumer and Retail Food Safety
Phone: (919) 515-9148
Email: cadescha@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: The overall goal of the Area Specialized Agents (ASAs) in Consumer & Retail Food Safety is to provide North Carolinians with technical food safety information and to support Family and Consumer Sciences agents in delivering timely and evidence-based food safety education and information to stakeholders.

Marti Day
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Dairy
Phone: (919) 542-8202
Email: marti_day@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Responsible for educational programs for dairy farmers, youth with an interest in dairy projects and the general public with an interest in dairy foods and the dairy industry.

Annie Freeman
Title: County Extension Support Specialist
Phone: (910) 997-8255
Email: annie_freeman@ncsu.edu

Richard Goforth
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Poultry
Phone: (910) 893-7530
Email: richard_goforth@ncsu.edu

Anthony Growe
Title: Extension Agent, Agriculture - Field Crops, Livestock
Phone: (910) 997-8255
Email: amgrowe@ncsu.edu

Marissa Herchler
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Animal Food Safety (FSMA Programs)
Phone: (919) 515-5396
Email: marissa_herchler@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Marissa is an Area Specialized Agent for animal food safety, with emphasis on the new Food Safety Modernization Act rules, as they apply to feed mills in North Carolina. Please contact Marissa with any FSMA related questions, or PCQI training inquiries.

Stacey Jones
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Commercial Nursery and Greenhouse
Phone: (704) 920-3310
Email: stacey_jones@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: I work with commercial greenhouses and nurseries to help them with growing related issues. These issues range from pests (insect, disease, and weeds), substrates, nutrition, and other miscellaneous topics.

Peggie Lewis Joyce
Title: Area 4-H Agent - Central Region
Phone: (336) 242-2080
Email: peggie_lewis@ncsu.edu

Colby Lambert
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Forestry
Phone: (910) 814-6041
Email: colby_lambert@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provides educational opportunities and technical support to forest landowners, agents, and forest industry in eastern North Carolina.

Currey Nobles
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Food Safety
Phone: (919) 515-9520
Email: canobles@ncsu.edu

Nancy Power
Title: Extension Agent, Agriculture - Commercial Horticulture
Phone: (910) 997-8255
Email: nrpower@ncsu.edu

Ashley Robbins
Title: Area Specialized Agent - Dairy
Phone: (919) 542-8203
Email: ashley_robbins@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Marti Day and I are the Area Specialized Dairy Agents - the county-based arm of the Cooperative Extension Dairy Team. We are out here in the counties to help you set and reach your farm, family and business goals. We have collaborative expertise in the areas of Waste Management, Udder Health, Cow Comfort, Nutrition and Forage Management with specialties in (Ashley)Reproduction, Records Management, Animal Health and (Marti)Alternative Markets, Organic Dairy, Grazing Management, and On-farm Processing. We hope to provide comprehensive educational programs for our farmers, consumers and youth for every county across the state. We are here for you by phone, email or text and look forward to working with you!

Janice Roberts
Title: Area Agent, Family and Consumer Sciences
Phone: (910) 997-8255
Email: janice_roberts@ncsu.edu

Elena Rogers
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Food Safety - Fresh Produce Western NC
Phone: (828) 352-2519
Email: elena_rogers@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provide educational programs, training and technical support focusing on fresh produce safety to Agents and growers in Western NC.

Catherine Shelley
Title: Extension Agent, 4-H Youth Development
Phone: (910) 417-0258
Email: cgshelle@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: I manage youth development programs and volunteers in my county.

Mitch Woodward
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Watersheds and Water Quality
Phone: (919) 414-3873
Email: mdwoodwa@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: NC Cooperative Extension's Goals include: - NC's natural resources and environmental quality will be protected, conserved and enhanced. - NC will have profitable, environmentally sustainable plant, animal and food systems. Protecting our environmental resources, particularly drinking water quality, is a top priority in NC. NC Cooperative Extension is a leader in teaching, researching, and accelerating the adoption of effective water quality protection practices.

IX. Contact Information

Richmond County Center
123 Caroline St
Suite 100
Rockingham, NC 28379

Phone: (910) 997-8255
Fax: (910) 997-8257
URL: http://richmond.ces.ncsu.edu