2018 Rockingham County Program Impact Report

Approved: January 25, 2019

I. Executive Summary

Rockingham County Cooperative Extension provides strong programming and county leadership to meet the changing needs of our citizens, as well as the priorities of our county government. We are the well-known source of relevant and timely education that meets the needs of county residents in a variety of different program areas.

Rockingham County Cooperative Extension is a leader in local food initiatives through their support of local farmer's markets and both commercial and home horticulture producers throughout the county. In 2018, 863 local food producers and homeowners gained skills or knowledge related to local food production due to educational training and resources. Timely, relevant education by our Horticulture Agent has included pruning demonstrations, fruit and vegetable production, value-added product information, alternative enterprises, farm tours, and field trips.

The Field Crops Agent regularly provides one-on-one consultations with tobacco farmers and other field crop producers; providing them with relevant research on timely topics. Over 250 tobacco producers were trained in Good Agricultural Practices (GAP) in 2018, which allowed them to remain eligible for production contracts with leaf buyers. Adoption of Cooperative Extension recommendations resulted in a $123,050 net increase for producers.

Our Livestock Agent has well-known regular newsletters and workshops involving the cattle and cattle industry including soil management and estate planning. Over 53 animal producers adopted extension-recommended best management practices, including those practices related to husbandry, improved planning, marketing, and financial practices in 2018. This resulted in a net increase in producer income in excess of $9,000.

The 4-H Agent works extensively with community clubs, volunteers, students, and educators. In 2018, 413 youth attended the popular Summer Adventures. Extensive partnerships with the schools are highlighted year-round with 2,128 youth participating in school enrichment training and an additional 836 youth participating in 4-H leadership training.

Across all program areas, agents taught or facilitated 106 workshops, demonstrations, and other events, which resulted in 26,239 community contacts via face-to-face methods, e-mail, telephone, and direct mailings.

In 2018, Cooperative Extension staff conservatively reported that 797 volunteers contributed a total of 10,121 hours at dollar value of $24.69 per hour, which resulted in an estimated value of $249,887 to the overall program.

Fiscal resources generated from outside funding sources in 2018 to assist with program implementation totaled $13,990; comprised primarily of grants, donations, sponsor support, and United Way contributions.

II. County Background

Rockingham County was formed in 1785 and has a land area of approximately 572 square miles. The county is recognized as rural, but according to the United States Census, the total population of Rockingham County is 93,643, including six municipalities. There are approximately 165 people per square mile in Rockingham County. The local economy is depressed, as the historical mainstays of tobacco, textiles, and manufacturing have faltered in global competition--thus, the N.C. Department of Commerce assigns a Tier 2 economically distressed designation to the county.

Tobacco continues to be the leading source of agricultural income in our county although the number of farmers has declined significantly from peak production years. Agricultural production is becoming more diverse with commercial horticulture, increasing demand for local grown food, growth of farmers markets, and expansion of agritourism events. Development and investment in profitable farm management plans, selection of new farm enterprises, capital needs, biotechnology, pesticide issues, rural-urban interaction and environmental issues must be addressed by farmers.

Livestock producers must continue to address environmental protection, food quality and safety issues in addition to new developments in production. Commercial and consumer horticulture needs continue to expand with improvements in the regional economy. Extension programs will help all of these producers by providing research based information assisting in developing opportunities for profitability and meeting challenges of economy and public opinion.

Rockingham County families and youth face issues of the economy, quality education, and health concerns. Rockingham County 4-H can address these issues through multiple delivery modes; such as clubs, school enrichment, summer adventures, and special interest programming. Rockingham County 4-H will impact the future of Rockingham County through the youth that it serves. Programming through 4-H teaches life skills, workforce development and community engagement. Youth participate in programs that are addressing the issues important to our future. Volunteers conduct the programs coordinated through the 4-H county program. With support of United Way, businesses, and citizens, 4-H offers opportunities for youth to become future leaders.

Food Safety is a growing area of concern throughout the United States. We have the opportunity to educate businesses, schools, government as well as private organizations, and individuals to improve their food handling skills and change behaviors for increased food safety from the farm to the fork.

Sixty-three percent of adults are overweight or obese, and rates of obesity among youth are rising. Overweight and unhealthy eating behaviors are risk factors for heart disease, diabetes, cancer, and other causes of death. The need exists for a stronger awareness of achievable healthy behaviors throughout the county.

Volunteerism offers Cooperative Extension the opportunity to expand efforts. Cooperative Extension Volunteers are effective multipliers of educational information as they help extend education throughout Rockingham County with over 100 members involved in 10 community clubs. We provide training for volunteers so they can work at the local level for the progressive improvement of home and community life.

Marketing Cooperative Extension is a high priority. Strong efforts are underway that radically heighten the visibility of our organization in Rockingham County through an enhanced presence in the business and civic community and increased partnerships.

Additional support by program committees of the Extension Advisory Council assure that our citizens are provided the greatest opportunities for success as we plan for the future of Cooperative Extension in Rockingham County.

III. Objectives to Address the Cooperative Extension Long Range Plan

North Carolina's plant production systems will become more profitable and sustainable.

Value* Outcome Description
138Number of crop (all plant systems) producers increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, and/or skills as related to: 1. Best management production practices (cultural, nutrient, and genetics) 2. Pest/insect, disease, weed, wildlife management 3. Financial/Farm management tools and practices (business, marketing, government policy, human resources) 4. Alternative agriculture, bioenergy, and value-added enterprises
2Number of Extension initiated and controlled County demonstration test sites (new required for GLF/PSI reporting)
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
335Number of crop (all plant systems) producers adopting best management practices, including those practices related to nutrient management, conservation, production, cultivars, pest management (weeds, diseases, insects), business management, and marketing
123050Net income gains realized by the adoption of best management practices, including those practices related to nutrient management, conservation, production, cultivars, pest management (weeds, diseases, insects), business management, and marketing
18Number of producers reporting increased dollar returns per acre or reduced costs per acre
16Number of producers reporting reduction in fertilizer used per acre
9050Number of acres in conservation tillage or other Best Management Practice
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

North Carolina's animal production systems will become more profitable and sustainable.

Value* Outcome Description
35Number of animal producers increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, and/or skills as related to: 1. Best management production practices (cultural, nutrient, and genetics) 2. Pest/insect, disease, weed, wildlife management 3. Financial/Farm management tools and practices (business, marketing, government policy, human resources) 4. Alternative agriculture, bioenergy, and value-added enterprises
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
10Number of animal producers adopting Extension-recommended best management practices, including those practices related to husbandry, improved planning, marketing, and financial practices
1000Net income gains by producers adopting Extension-recommended best management practices, including those practices related to husbandry, improved planning, marketing, and financial practices
4Number of animal producers implementing Extension-recommended best management practices for animal waste management
10Tons of livestock organic by-products utilized (nutrients from waste, compost, etc)
8000Net income gain by using livestock organic by-products instead of synthetic fertilizers
4Number of waste management certifications gained or maintained due to Extension education efforts
40Number of acres where Extension-recommended waste analysis was used for proper land application
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Producers will increase sales of food locally to more agriculturally aware consumers through market development, producer and consumer education, and new farmer and infrastructure support.

Value* Outcome Description
176Number of producers who gain skills or knowledge to increase production for local markets.
340Number of adults (including producers, food business owners, etc.) who improved knowledge of local food and agricultural systems.
232Number of children/youth who improved knowledge of local food and agricultural systems.
50Number of individuals who gain knowledge or acquire skills related to vegetable/fruit gardening, and if also reporting under Urban and Consumer Agriculture Objective, divide up the reported number appropriately between the two objectives to avoid duplication.
19Number of producers who improve local food marketing skills or knowledge.
20Number of individuals who learn how to prepare local foods, including through use of home food preservation techniques.
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
2Number of new and existing access points for consumers that expand or improve their offering of local fruits and vegetables. Access points include farmers markets, retail stores, school food programs, community gardens, institutions other than schools (e.g. hospitals, universities, etc.), and other systems/access points not noted (e.g. restaurants, etc.).
20Number of producers selling their agricultural products to local markets (direct, intermediated/food service, institutional) for consumption in NC.
2Number of producers who diversified their marketing strategies into local markets (direct, intermediated/food service, institutional).
2Number of new farms (beginning farmers) selling into local markets for local consumption (in this reporting period).
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Individuals and groups will acquire leadership and decision making capacities needed to guide and actively participate in local and state organizations.

Value* Outcome Description
66Number of adults increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
12Number of adults assuming new/expanded leadership roles in the community
346Number of youth increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
9Number of youth assuming new/expanded leadership roles in the community
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
66Number of adults increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
12Number of adults assuming new/expanded leadership roles in the community
346Number of youth increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
9Number of youth assuming new/expanded leadership roles in the community
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Youth and adults will address community issues and/or challenges through volunteerism.

Community members, organizations and local government will engage in collaborative dialog and decision-making to build economically, socially and environmentally resilient communities. This will be done through inclusive engagement, partnership building, and/or community planning.

Value* Outcome Description
21Number of participants increasing knowledge and skills in convening and leading inclusive, representative groups (including limited resources, new resident, or immigrant groups) for evidence based community development
32Number of participants developing skills in leading community, economic, and/or disaster planning and change
9Number of communities that have included agricultural and food system considerations into disaster preparedness plans or procedures due to Extension’s involvement
27Number of residents that increase their knowledge in disaster preparedness planning, mitigation and recovery
11Number of participants who increased their awareness, knowledge or skill in business related topics (e.g., management, product development, marketing, business structure options, business law and/or liability)
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
6Number of businesses created, retained, or expanded due to Extension’s community and economic development programming
1Number of local food councils in which Extension is involved
26Number of participants who adopted disaster preparedness and mitigation practices
5Number of participants who report new or expanded leadership roles and opportunities undertaken
39450Dollar value of in-kind resources (funding, in-kind service or volunteers) contributed to Projects or Programs in which Extension was critically involved by an organization or community to support community or economic development work
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Futures that Work: School to Career Pathways

Value* Outcome Description
98Number of teachers trained in 4-H STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) curriculum
1838Number of youth (students) increasing knowledge in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math)
980Total number of female participants in STEM program
410Number of youth (students) increasing knowledge of career/employability skills
35Number of youth (students) increasing knowledge of entrepreneurship
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
94Number of teachers using 4-H STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) curriculum in their classrooms
1838Number of youth (students) gaining knowledge in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math)
379Number of youth (students) gaining career / employability skills
35Number of youth (students) gaining entrepreneurship skills
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Youth and adult program participants will make healthy food choices, achieve the recommended amount of physical activity and reduce risk factors for chronic diseases.

IV. Number of Contacts Made by Extension

Type of ContactNumber
Face-to-face* 7,097
Non face-to-face** 18,971
Total by Extension staff in 2018 26,068
* Face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make directly with individuals through one-on-one visits, meetings, and other activities where staff members work directly with individuals.
** Non face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make indirectly with individuals by telephone, email, newsletters, news articles, radio, television, and other means.

V. Designated Grants Received by Extension

Type of GrantAmount
Contracts/Grants $1,300.00
Gifts/Donations $1,450.00
In-Kind Grants/Donations $0.00
United Way/Foundations $10,000.00
User Fees $1,240.00
Total $13,990.00

VI. Volunteer Involvement in Extension Programs

Number of Volunteers* Number of Volunteer Hours Known client contacts by volunteers Dollar Value at 25.43
4-H: 550 2,620 3,201 $ 66,627.00
Advisory Leadership System: 144 211 1,173 $ 5,366.00
Extension Community Association: 81 7,272 1,943 $ 184,927.00
Extension Master Gardener: 0 0 0 $ 0.00
Other: 22 18 118 $ 458.00
Total: 797 10121 6435 $ 257,377.00
* The number of volunteers reflects the overall number of volunteers for multiple events.

VII. Membership of Advisory Leadership System

Horticulture/Local Foods
Deborah Crumpton
Sam Crumpton
Rachelle Reynolds
Robert Nesbitt
Bob Mitchell
Charles Southard
Richard Teague
Paul Winkler
Jerry Tyson
William Waddell
Green Industry
Webster Irving
Chris Crump
Sharon Jones
Timothy Haley
Jimmy Jones
Doug Dalton
Lynn Knight
Steve Schorr
Jennifer Altizer
Vicente Herandez
Rockingham County Advisory Council
Tom Balsley
John Ashe, Jr.
Reese Pyrtle
Deborah Crumpton
Neil Burnette
Richard Ratliff
Gail Bryson
Booker Hudson
Jason Byrd
Bobby Baker
John Isley
Royce Richardson
Linda Hill
Thomas Thompson
Jerry Roberts
Horse
Steva Allgood
Randy Boles
Sara Jo Durham
B.J. Rierson
Georgianne Sims
Jerry Tyson
Volunteerism
Hazel Puckett
Barbara Smith
Agnes Shelton
Linda Hill
Terry Witty
4-H
Kim Sheets
Angela Thomas
Charmaine Neal
Carole Moore
Jessica McVey
Richard Isley
Susan Johannesmann
Nancy Norwood
Gail Bryson
Field Crops
Kevin Knight
Tommy French
Tim Kallam
Susan Reece
Bobby Baker
Mark Baker
Tommy Kimbro
Harden Brown
Kent Page
Dennis McAllister
Jason Byrd
Neil Burnette
Mike Powell
Beef Cattle
Jim Anderson
Tommy Carter
Ryan Clark
Carl Chatham
Lily Chatham
David Holleman
Elizabeth Holleman
Booker Hudson
Bernie Pryor
Cheryl Pryor
Nutrition
Beverly Scurry
Tara Martin
Katrina White
Deirdre Moyer
Cam Dillard

VIII. Staff Membership

Will Strader
Title: County Extension Director, Rockingham and Stokes, interim
Phone: (336) 342-8230
Email: will_strader@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Administration, Tobacco, Field Crops, & Community Development

Laura Apple
Title: County Extension Administrative Assistant
Phone: (336) 342-8230
Email: laura_apple@ncsu.edu

Daniel Campeau
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Poultry
Phone: (919) 542-8202
Email: dan_campeau@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Work mainly with Commercial Poultry industry. I also work with small scale poultry production. Service area is now the North Central District from Guilford to Halifax with the southern edge being Chatham and Wake county respectively.

Marti Day
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Dairy
Phone: (919) 542-8202
Email: marti_day@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Responsible for educational programs for dairy farmers, youth with an interest in dairy projects and the general public with an interest in dairy foods and the dairy industry.

Erin Eure
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Commercial Fruits and Vegetables
Phone: (252) 357-1400
Email: erin_eure@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provides educational opportunities and technical support to commercial fruit and vegetable growers, agents, and industry in northeastern NC.

Marissa Herchler
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Animal Food Safety (FSMA Programs)
Phone: (919) 515-5396
Email: marissa_herchler@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Marissa is an Area Specialized Agent for animal food safety, with emphasis on the new Food Safety Modernization Act rules, as they apply to feed mills in North Carolina. Please contact Marissa with any FSMA related questions, or PCQI training inquiries.

Kathryn Holmes
Title: Extension Agent, Agriculture
Phone: (336) 342-8230
Email: kathryn_holmes@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Horticulture Agent and Pesticide Coordinator in Rockingham County: work with commercial fruit and vegetable producers, small farms, local foods, horticulture greenhouses and nurseries, forestry, beekeeping, landscapers, golf courses, and home gardeners.

Jordan Jefferies-James
Title: Extension Agent, Family and Consumer Sciences
Phone: (336) 342-8230
Email: jjeffer3@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: To promote healthy habits and improve the well-being of participants through nutrition education and physical activity.

Stacey Jones
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Commercial Nursery and Greenhouse
Phone: (704) 920-3310
Email: stacey_jones@ncsu.edu

Peggie Lewis Joyce
Title: Area 4-H Agent - Central Region
Phone: (336) 242-2080
Email: peggie_lewis@ncsu.edu

Bill Lord
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Water Resources
Phone: (919) 496-3344
Email: william_lord@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Water quality education and technical assistance

Morgan Maness
Title: Extension Agent, 4-H Youth Development
Phone: (336) 342-8230
Email: morgan_maness@ncsu.edu

Rachel McDowell
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Consumer and Retail Food Safety
Phone: (919) 515-9155
Email: romcdowe@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Support FCS Agents in delivering timely and evidence-based food safety education and information to stakeholders in NC.

Currey Nobles
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Food Safety
Phone: (919) 515-9520
Email: canobles@ncsu.edu

Elena Rogers
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Food Safety - Fresh Produce Western NC
Phone: (828) 352-2519
Email: elena_rogers@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provide educational programs, training and technical support focusing on fresh produce safety to Agents and growers in Western NC.

Abby Whitaker
Title: Extension Agent, Agriculture - Livestock and Forage Crops
Phone: (336) 342-8230
Email: abby_whitaker@ncsu.edu

Mitch Woodward
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Watersheds and Water Quality
Phone: (919) 250-1112
Email: mdwoodwa@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: NC Cooperative Extension's Goals include: - NC's natural resources and environmental quality will be protected, conserved and enhanced. - NC will have profitable, environmentally sustainable plant, animal and food systems. Protecting our environmental resources, particularly drinking water quality, is a top priority in NC. NC Cooperative Extension is a leader in teaching, researching, and accelerating the adoption of effective water quality protection practices.

IX. Contact Information

Rockingham County Center
525 NC 65
Suite 200
Reidsville, NC 27320

Phone: (336) 342-8230
Fax: (336) 342-8242
URL: http://rockingham.ces.ncsu.edu