2017 Rowan County Program Impact Report

Approved: February 15, 2018

I. Executive Summary

Rowan County Cooperative Extension selected the following objectives in the 2017 Plan of Work: School to Career, Volunteer Readiness, Local Foods, Natural Resources Conservation and Environmental Sustainability, Healthy Eating, Physical Activity and Chronic Disease Management; Profitable and Sustainable Agriculture Systems; and Urban and Consumer Agriculture. Rowan County Cooperative Extension staff had over 10,000 face to face contacts and 45,000 nonface to face contact with Rowan County citizens. Rowan County staff conducted 128 meetings and workshops to address the identified focus areas. Agents utilized the local newspaper providing weekly educational information to over 880,000 citizens and a local radio program reaching 300,000 citizens. Private grants, donations, and user fees totaling over $9,000 were acquired to assist Extension Programming. Over 600 Extension Volunteers contributed 6,000 hours of volunteer service valued at $151,000 to support Extension Agents with educational programs and serving on advisory committees. Agents were able to increase programming areas in youth, as well as animal science. Extension utilized three student interns, which aided in contributing an additional 900 hours valued at $9,000 to Rowan County.

All Extension Agents were involved in youth programming. Agents assisted teachers utilizing the Marshall Mentoring Program, 4-H Summer Fun, Rowan County Fair, and after-school clubs that included over 500 youth. The Rowan County 4-H Shooting Sports Program hosted its first shooting tournament in May with 49 youth from nine surrounding counties. This tournament gave competitors the opportunity to shoot in a competitive environment preparing them for Regional and State competitions.

Over 1,200 Rowan County citizens attended healthy cooking classes and demonstrations, including six veterans in transitional housing who were taught how to plan and cook nutritional meals for themselves. A weeklong Summer Fun camp was held for youth ages 9-13, where they were instructed in basic cooking and etiquette skills. The last day of the camp students prepared and presented a five-course dinner for their parents.

Extension partnered with the Rowan County Health Department, EMS, Sherriff’s Department, and Cardinal Innovations to form an opioid crisis committee. The committee was asked by the Rowan County Board of Commissioners to address the growing opioid crisis in Rowan County. Extension hosted a forum for over 150 elected officials to attend and work together to strategize on how to address the issue.

In 2017 ten farms totaling 480 acres were enrolled in the Rowan County Voluntary Agricultural District (VAD). Benefits of being in a VAD include recognition and public education about agriculture including signage; increased protection from nuisance suits including noise, odor, dust, or slow moving farm vehicles; waiver of water and sewer assessments. Rowan County now has over 11,000 acres enrolled in farmland preservation programs.

These are just a few examples of how Cooperative Extension in Rowan County strives to improve the quality of lives with research-based, educational information.

II. County Background

Cooperative Extension in Rowan County continues to provide educational programs that provide citizens solutions to financial problems, especially with the onset of unfavorable economic conditions. Cooperative Extension agents (educators) conduct diverse educational programs to support, develop, and enhance sustainable, profitable, safe plant, animal, and food systems. Programs are developed and integrated that allow youth and adults, the opportunity to achieve educational excellence equipping them with both life and parenting skills. Integrated educational programs are instrumental for citizens to maintain a healthy weight, as well as prevention of chronic disease. Volunteer and community leadership, along with economic and workforce development, are important issues for Rowan County. Programs are also provided in natural resources management, environmental stewardship, energy conservation and emergency and/or disaster preparedness.

The county population remained static in 2016 at 139,000 residents. The county’s unemployment is 5.3 %, which is about the average unemployment rate in North Carolina. In Rowan County, 19% of the population live at or below the poverty level. Even though Rowan County is classified as an urban county of 511 square miles, it has 1,011 working farms encompassing 121,145 acres. Approximately 40% of the population lives in the rural areas of Rowan County. Dairy and beef cattle operations are ranked ninth and eleventh respectively in North Carolina in total cash receipts. Field crops consisting of corn, soybeans, small grains, and hay account for 63,000 acres of farmland. The total cash receipts from these commodities account for over 74 million dollars to Rowan County’s total income. Interest in local foods continues to gain momentum with two viable farmers markets contributing over 500,000 dollars in total retail sales. Agritourism is a significant part of local tourism contributing 15% of the total impact. The total impact of tourism in Rowan County is $160 million with agritourism estimated at $24 million a year. Rowan County is home to two agritourism farm destinations, North Carolina’s only water buffalo creamery, and three wineries.

There are many challenges facing the citizens of Rowan County. However, the overall key issues are poverty, lack of jobs and underemployment, chronic disease problems and obesity, loss of productive farmland and open space, and increased energy costs. These issues were prioritized through an environmental scan from advisory and ad hoc committees, governing officials, and local citizens. Targeted issues include: eating healthy, improving health, chronic disease reduction, increased consumption of local foods, improving the agricultural and food supply system, environmental stewardship and natural resources, and increasing economic opportunity and business development.

The county commissioners recognize their top issues as increasing economic opportunity and business development; improving the agricultural and food supply system; increasing educational achievement and excellence; and improving health and nutrition. The educational goals and programming efforts of Cooperative Extension continue to dovetail with the goals and aspirations of Rowan County.

III. Objectives to Address the Cooperative Extension Long Range Plan

North Carolina's plant production systems will become more profitable and sustainable.

Value* Outcome Description
30Number of crop (all plant systems) producers increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, and/or skills as related to: 1. Best management production practices (cultural, nutrient, and genetics) 2. Pest/insect, disease, weed, wildlife management 3. Financial/Farm management tools and practices (business, marketing, government policy, human resources) 4. Alternative agriculture, bioenergy, and value-added enterprises
1Number of Extension initiated and controlled County demonstration test sites (new required for GLF/PSI reporting)
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
30Number of crop (all plant systems) producers adopting best management practices, including those practices related to nutrient management, conservation, production, cultivars, pest management (weeds, diseases, insects), business management, and marketing
1000Net income gains realized by the adoption of best management practices, including those practices related to nutrient management, conservation, production, cultivars, pest management (weeds, diseases, insects), business management, and marketing
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

North Carolina's animal production systems will become more profitable and sustainable.

Value* Outcome Description
200Number of animal producers increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, and/or skills as related to: 1. Best management production practices (cultural, nutrient, and genetics) 2. Pest/insect, disease, weed, wildlife management 3. Financial/Farm management tools and practices (business, marketing, government policy, human resources) 4. Alternative agriculture, bioenergy, and value-added enterprises
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
200Number of animal producers adopting Extension-recommended best management practices, including those practices related to husbandry, improved planning, marketing, and financial practices
1000Net income gains by producers adopting Extension-recommended best management practices, including those practices related to husbandry, improved planning, marketing, and financial practices
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Producers will increase sales of food locally to more agriculturally aware consumers through market development, producer and consumer education, and new farmer and infrastructure support.

Value* Outcome Description
28Number of producers who gain skills or knowledge to increase production for local markets.
28Number of adults (including producers, food business owners, etc.) who improved knowledge of local food and agricultural systems.
28Number of individuals who gain knowledge or acquire skills related to vegetable/fruit gardening, and if also reporting under Urban and Consumer Agriculture Objective, divide up the reported number appropriately between the two objectives to avoid duplication.
28Number of producers who improve local food marketing skills or knowledge.
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
28Number of producers selling their agricultural products to local markets (direct, intermediated/food service, institutional) for consumption in NC.
4000Gross sales of local foods by producers. (Increase in gross sales to be calculated at the state level.)
4Number of producers (and other members of the local food supply chain) who have increased revenue.
1Number of new farms (beginning farmers) selling into local markets for local consumption (in this reporting period).
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Agricultural producers, workers, food handlers and consumers will adopt safer food and agricultural production, handling, and distribution practices that reduce workplace and home injuries/illnesses, enhance food security, and increase the quality and safety of food that North Carolinians prepare and consume.

Value* Outcome Description
10Number of participants trained in safe home food handling, preservation, or preparation practices
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Youth and adults will address community issues and/or challenges through volunteerism.

Value* Outcome Description
52Number of adult participants acquiring the skills needed to serve as a volunteer
10Number of youth participants reporting aspirations to serve in new or expanded volunteer roles in community
25Number of adult participants reporting aspirations to serve in new or expanded volunteer roles in community
224Number of hours adult volunteer training conducted
6Number new volunteers recruited
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
25Increased number of hours contributed by trained youth volunteers
150Increased number of hours contributed by trained adult volunteers
5Number of youth volunteers serving in new or expanded roles within Extension
25Number of adult volunteers serving in new or expanded roles within Extension
3Number of youth volunteers serving in new or expanded roles beyond Extension, including community boards and task forces
27Number of adult volunteers recruiting and/or training new volunteers
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Futures that Work: School to Career Pathways

North Carolinians will make decisions and adopt practices that implement effective resource protection and conservation.

Value* Outcome Description
116Number of participants increasing their knowledge about best management practices
58Number of youth and adults demonstrating increased knowledge of natural resources and environmental issues
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
10Number of participants that adopted recommended climate adaption strategies for production agriculture or natural resource management, including for invasive species, pest management, pollutant loads, and wetlands.
480Number of acres under recommended climate adaption strategies for production agriculture or natural resource management, including for invasive species, pest management, pollutant loads, and wetlands.
10Number of participants that adopted recommended climate mitigation practices such as water-use efficiency, livestock production feeding practices, carbon sequestration, reducing carbon or energy footprint.
480Number of acres under recommended climate mitigation practices such as water-use efficiency, livestock production feeding practices, carbon sequestration, reducing carbon or energy footprint.
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Consumers and communities will enhance the value of plants, animals, and landscapes while conserving valuable natural resources and protecting the environment.

Value* Outcome Description
210Number of participants improving knowledge, attitude, skills and aspirations regarding gardening and landscape practices including plant selection and placement, turfgrass management, soil management, growing food, water conservation and water quality preservation, storm water and erosion management, green waste management, pest and wildlife management
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
210Number of participants who use extension-recommended best management practices in landscapes, turf, and gardens, including pest (insect, weed, disease) management, fertility management, water conservation, water quality preservation and pruning techniques
5250Total cost savings from the use of extension-recommended best management practices in landscapes, turf, and gardens, including pest (insect, weed, disease) management, fertility management, water conservation, water quality preservation and pruning techniques
272Number of participants who use extension-recommended pest management practices in homes, public facilities, businesses or in community pest management programs
6800Cost savings from using extension-recommended pest management practices in homes, public facilities, businesses or in community pest management programs
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Youth and adult program participants will make healthy food choices, achieve the recommended amount of physical activity and reduce risk factors for chronic diseases.

Value* Impact Description
895Number of adults increasing their fruit and vegetables consumption
56Number of youth increasing their fruit and vegetable consumption
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

IV. Number of Contacts Made by Extension

Type of ContactNumber
Face-to-face* 10,048
Non face-to-face** 33,962
Total by Extension staff in 2017 44,010
* Face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make directly with individuals through one-on-one visits, meetings, and other activities where staff members work directly with individuals.
** Non face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make indirectly with individuals by telephone, email, newsletters, news articles, radio, television, and other means.

V. Designated Grants Received by Extension

Type of GrantAmount
Contracts/Grants $1,500.00
Gifts/Donations $4,750.00
In-Kind Grants/Donations $0.00
United Way/Foundations $0.00
User Fees $2,905.00
Total $9,155.00

VI. Volunteer Involvement in Extension Programs

Number of Volunteers* Number of Volunteer Hours Known client contacts by volunteers Dollar Value at 24.69
4-H: 117 1,450 4,100 $ 35,801.00
Advisory Leadership System: 63 16 500 $ 395.00
Extension Community Association: 27 1,248 9,754 $ 30,813.00
Extension Master Gardener: 414 3,562 8,775 $ 87,946.00
Other: 20 8 38 $ 198.00
Total: 641 6284 23167 $ 155,152.00
* The number of volunteers reflects the overall number of volunteers for multiple events.

VII. Membership of Advisory Leadership System

Rowan County Extension Advisory Council
Amie Baudoin
Joey Bullock
Randy Cox
Amy Pruitt
Vivian Ray
Beth Stebe
Teresa Herman
Penny Collins
Kevin Fisher
Judy Klusman
Stephanie Frisbee
Libby Watson
Tonya Zimmerman

Extension Community Association Rowan County Council
Janice Evans
Ruth Julian
Rebecca Lyerly
Anne Zaffino
Becky Barringer
Specialty Crops/Farmers Market
Mike Miller
Dottie Foy
David Correll
Chase Reynolds
Amy Smith



4-H Parents and Leaders
Ann Furr
Beth Stebe
Carole Massey
Diana Wallace
Cheryl Oster
Sherry Gobble
Gina Blandino
Maggie Boreman
Meillyn Allen
Kim Murphy
Brandy Hampton
Sarah Lakey
Billie Lynn Sullivan
Sherry Hill
RACE (Rowan Advisory for Equestrian 4-H Clubs)
Joey Hilton
Joey Bullock
Maggie Boreman
Pearl Lund

Rowan County Holstein Club Advisory Members
Andy Corriher
Craig Corriher
Karen Moore
Tonia Menius
Mike Ketchie
Laura Hoffner
David Pless
Luke Knox
Ben Moore
Richard Luther
Rowan County Cattlemen Advisory Members
Joe Hampton
Dale Riley
Oscho Deal
Sherilee Deal
Kim Starnes
Chris Sloop
Mark Mauldin
Chamber of Commerce Agriculture Committee
Biff Yost
Michelle Patterson
Elaine Spaulding
Shane Wolford
Corrie Connally
Joe Hampton
Libby Watson
Aimee Boudoin
NC Farm School
Gary Bullen
Bevin Fink
Lee Menius
Mary Jac Brennan
Mike Tate
Pam Jones
Derek Washburn
Amanda Taylor
Der Holcomb
Rowan County Farmland Preservation Board (VAD)
Kim Starnes
Mark Mauldin
Randy Elium
Ann Furr
Darrell Nichols
Chris Sloop
David Poole
Rowan County Extension Master Gardener Volunteer Association Board of Directors
Randy Cox
Debbie Scott
Terri Myers
Edna Burger
Dawn Holhouser
Carole Massey
Lana Miller
Katherine Jones
Sue Davis
Rowan County Local Foods Committee
Laura Vella
Penny Collins
Chase Reynolds
Amy Smith

VIII. Staff Membership

Amy-Lynn Albertson
Title: County Extension Director and Extension Agent, Agriculture - Horticulture
Phone: (704) 216-8970
Email: amy_albertson@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Administration, Ornamental Horticulture, Forestry, Master Gardener Coordinator, Pesticide Coordinator

Laura Allen
Title: Extension Agent, 4-H Youth Development
Phone: (704) 216-8970
Email: laura_allen@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Responsible for managing the total 4-H program in Rowan County.

Causby
Phone:
Email: bcausby@hotmail.com

Marti Day
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Dairy
Phone: (919) 542-8202
Email: marti_day@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Responsible for educational programs for dairy farmers, youth with an interest in dairy projects and the general public with an interest in dairy foods and the dairy industry.

Toi Degree
Title: Extension Agent, Family and Consumer Sciences
Phone: (704) 216-8970
Email: toi_degree@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Food & Nutrition, Health & Wellness, Food safety, Food Presevation & Extension & Community Association (ECA) Liaison Agent.

Michael Fine
Title: Extension Agent, Agriculture
Phone: (704) 216-8970
Email: mofine@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Local Foods, Fruits, Vegetables, Specialty Crops

Lauren Greene
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Poultry
Phone: (336) 651-7347
Email: lauren_greene@ncsu.edu

Marissa Herchler
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Animal Food Safety (FSMA Programs)
Phone: (919) 515-5396
Email: marissa_herchler@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Marissa is an Area Specialized Agent for animal food safety, with emphasis on the new Food Safety Modernization Act rules, as they apply to feed mills in North Carolina. Please contact Marissa with any FSMA related questions, or PCQI training inquiries.

Stacey Jones
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Commercial Nursery and Greenhouse
Phone: (704) 920-3310
Email: stacey_jones@ncsu.edu

Bill Lord
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Water Resources
Phone: (919) 496-3344
Email: william_lord@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Water quality education and technical assistance

Craig Mauney
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Commercial Vegetables & Fruits
Phone: (828) 684-3562
Email: craig_mauney@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provides educational opportunities, training and technical support to commercial fruit and vegetable growers, agents, and industry in Western NC.

Rachel McDowell
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Consumer and Retail Food Safety
Phone: (919) 515-9155
Email: romcdowe@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Support FCS Agents in delivering timely and evidence-based food safety education and information to stakeholders in NC.

Melva Menius
Title: County Extension Administrative Assistant
Phone: (704) 216-8970
Email: melva_menius@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Assist Director and 4-H.

Currey Nobles
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Food Safety
Phone: (919) 515-9520
Email: canobles@ncsu.edu

Brooke Peeler
Title: County Extension Support Specialist
Phone: (704) 216-8970
Email: brooke_peeler@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Part time employee - available from 10-2 M-F

Peterson
Phone:
Email: cpat2277@gmail.com

Christy Peterson
Phone:
Email: clpeter5@ncsu.edu

Elena Rogers
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Food Safety - Fresh Produce Western NC
Phone: (828) 352-2519
Email: elena_rogers@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provide educational programs, training and technical support focusing on fresh produce safety to Agents and growers in Western NC.

Morgan Watts
Title: Extension Agent, Agriculture - Livestock and Row Crops
Phone: (704) 216-8970
Email: morgan_watts@ncsu.edu

White
Phone:
Email: jkwhite98@gmail.com

Mitch Woodward
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Watersheds and Water Quality
Phone: (919) 250-1112
Email: mdwoodwa@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: NC Cooperative Extension's Goals include: - NC's natural resources and environmental quality will be protected, conserved and enhanced. - NC will have profitable, environmentally sustainable plant, animal and food systems. Protecting our environmental resources, particularly drinking water quality, is a top priority in NC. NC Cooperative Extension is a leader in teaching, researching, and accelerating the adoption of effective water quality protection practices.

IX. Contact Information

Rowan County Center
2727 Old Concord Rd
Salisbury, NC 28146

Phone: (704) 216-8970
Fax: (704) 216-8995
URL: http://rowan.ces.ncsu.edu