2017 Scotland County Program Impact Report

Approved: January 25, 2018

I. Executive Summary

In 2017, Scotland County Cooperative Extension Service conducted educational programs in the areas of agriculture, local foods, food safety and 4-H youth development. In programs and events conducted throughout the county, 15,188 citizens were impacted through 449 educational events. 103 farmers, food service employees and Master Gardner’s received continuing education credits as required by their businesses and certifications. Throughout the year, 449 volunteers donated 1,388 hours of their time to assist in delivering programs in the community. This equates to $33,506 of in-kind labor donations. In addition, $19,541 were generated through grants, user fees, and program contributions.


Scotland County 4-H conducted several programs in 2017 to meet the needs of families and youth. Scotland 4-H conducted 43 youth programs and 10 programs for adult volunteers. Youth programs ranged in the areas of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM), leadership, teambuilding, citizenship, community service and workforce development.

Due to the success of the workforce development module piloted in Scotland county in previous years, in 2017 4-H partnered with Scots for Youth, whose mission is to provide supportive community programs to prevent and/or deter juvenile delinquency. Both agencies worked together to facilitate the 4-H Employee Work Readiness, a workforce development program that assists middle school and high-school aged youth to develop skills that will help them prepare for the workforce and college settings.

Scotland County 4-H collaborated with Scotland County 4-H EFNEP (Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program) to facilitate a 9-week, free summer youth program. This program combined the 4-H experience of interactive, hands-on learning by doing with EFNEP’s physical fitness and healthy lifestyles activities. In addition to life-skills and physical activities, participating youth were provided two meals per day through the summer feeding program. Approximately 120 Scotland County families benefited from an affordable and safe summer program with adults and volunteers that encompassed reading, writing and math skills, minimizing the educational gap that so many youth experience over the summer. There were approximately 60 youth, ages 5-18 that participated each week during the summer.

Scotland County 4-H Expanded Food Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP) provides youth with basic nutrition concepts and helps to improve their food preparation and safety skills. It also fosters positive dietary behaviors that they will carry with them into and throughout adulthood. The 4-H EFNEP Program was active in the county with 9 schools, churches and daycares hosting 529 classes with over 1,196 youth participating. Surveys conducted after the conclusion of each session indicated that 70% of participants increased their level of daily physical activity. Additionally, 96% of participating youth were able to identify and make healthier food choices. A total of 59 volunteers contributed over 624 hours toward program support.

In the area of Family and Consumer Sciences, numerous programs were conducted this past year. In Food Safety, ServSafe training was taught to 46 local food service professionals to prevent food-borne illnesses. With a single case of food poisoning costing an establishment $75,000, this potentially saved the county $3,400,000. Additionally, 83 school cafeteria workers received HACCP (Hazardous Analysis Critical Control Point) food safety training. As a result of this training, employees learned to identify potential hazards in their food production process and how to incorporate actions to prevent these hazards from occurring.

A weekly line dancing program is offered by the Extension and Community Association (ECA). This program promotes physical activity to a diverse audience throughout the county. In a recent survey, 43 regular attendees indicated improvements in their lives, including; improved blood pressure, weight loss, improvement in balance, increase in energy level and improved social skills. In 2017, two additional health monitoring programs were implemented. Participants complete monthly health improvement update forms, and a monthly blood pressure check is now available through a collaboration with Scotland County EMS.

In agriculture, Scotland CES works with homeowners, gardeners, and farmers to ensure a safe, nutritious and profitable food production system in Scotland County. A major program success in 2017 was Cooperative Extension leading the way in forming a local food council. ScotLandGrows was chartered in the fall of 2017. Their mission is to support local farmers and provide education to Scotland citizens on the importance of buying locally and healthy eating

Scotland County Cooperative Extension partnered once again with the school system to host FoodCorps, which is a national service organization connecting kids to healthy food. Two elementary schools hosted this program for the 2015/2016 school year. FoodCorps has served 133 students, teaching hands-on lessons of agriculture, nutrition, and healthy eating.

The horticulture program was active in 2017. A regional master gardener training was held where 16 citizens earned their Master Gardner certification over a period of 8 weekly trainings. Additionally, 59 educational events were held for beekeepers, produce farmers, gardeners, and 4-H classes. 

Cooperative Extension continued to assist commercial farms in a number of ways. Technical assistance and farm visits, as well as 8 large commodity-based information meetings, were held in 2017.  Educational programs focused on livestock productions, row crop production, pesticide education and nutrient management. The value to local farmers was $138,000.

II. County Background

Scotland County is located in southeastern North Carolina adjacent to the South Carolina border. The county has a total area of 204,262 acres; spanning 18 miles east to west and 25 miles north to south. Scotland County is located halfway between Charlotte and Wilmington. In 2013, the population was 36,025 with approximately 47% White, 39% Black, 11% American Indian, and 3% other.

Nearly 16,000 people live in Laurinburg, the county seat. Gibson, Wagram, East Laurinburg, Laurel Hill, and a part of the town of Maxton make up the various other communities in the county. Of the approximately 36,000 people living in the county, 18,472 are considered rural with 546 living on farms.

According to the North Carolina Department of Agriculture's website, 190 farms are located in the county with an average farm size of 346 acres. The major crops produced are cotton, soybeans, corn, and small grains. Major animal production includes swine, cattle, and poultry. The estimated cash receipts from the sale of farm products in 2013 were approximate $81 million.

The median family income is $29,592 with a total of 15,233 housing units in the county. The unemployment rate for 2013 was the highest in the state. Scotland County is considered a TIER 1 county based on economic indicators.

The Scotland County School system has 13 schools, which enroll approximately 7,000 children annually. The 2013 SAT average score in Scotland was 1278 the state average is 1485. Additionally, St. Andrews Presbyterian University is located in Scotland County with an average enrollment of 900 students.

The Environmental Scanning process utilized secondary data collected from Scotland County Department of Social Services, The Rural Center, North Carolina A&T University, Scotland County Health Department, Scotland County Partnership for Children and Families, Juvenile Justice, North Carolina Employment Security Commission, The Small Business Technology Development Center, and the Scotland County Economic Development Plan. Also, key elected officials in the county were interviewed and a focus group was conducted in the summer of 2007. The Scotland County Advisory Council and the focus group assisted in prioritizing the issues and needs identified in the environmental scan. The following needs will be addressed by the 2017 Plan of Work.

1. Need for Economic Development Opportunities
2. Overweight/Obese Youth and Adults
3. Natural Resources Protected
4. Need for Structured Activities and Positive Role Models for Youth
5. Lack of Parenting Skills/Family Management
6. Need for Family Financial Management Skills

North Carolina Cooperative Extension is in a unique position to provide educational programming to various groups based on the identified needs. Taking research-based information generated at North Carolina State University, and North Carolina A & T State University can provide Scotland County citizens with much needed information to meet the needs of the county.

III. Objectives to Address the Cooperative Extension Long Range Plan

North Carolina's plant production systems will become more profitable and sustainable.

Value* Outcome Description
59Number of crop (all plant systems) producers increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, and/or skills as related to: 1. Best management production practices (cultural, nutrient, and genetics) 2. Pest/insect, disease, weed, wildlife management 3. Financial/Farm management tools and practices (business, marketing, government policy, human resources) 4. Alternative agriculture, bioenergy, and value-added enterprises
2Number of Extension initiated and controlled County demonstration test sites (new required for GLF/PSI reporting)
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
59Number of crop (all plant systems) producers adopting best management practices, including those practices related to nutrient management, conservation, production, cultivars, pest management (weeds, diseases, insects), business management, and marketing
180000Net income gains realized by the adoption of best management practices, including those practices related to nutrient management, conservation, production, cultivars, pest management (weeds, diseases, insects), business management, and marketing
10Number of producers reporting increased dollar returns per acre or reduced costs per acre
50Tons of feedstock delivered to processor
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

North Carolina's animal production systems will become more profitable and sustainable.

Value* Outcome Description
25Number of animal producers increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, and/or skills as related to: 1. Best management production practices (cultural, nutrient, and genetics) 2. Pest/insect, disease, weed, wildlife management 3. Financial/Farm management tools and practices (business, marketing, government policy, human resources) 4. Alternative agriculture, bioenergy, and value-added enterprises
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
26Number of animal producers adopting Extension-recommended best management practices, including those practices related to husbandry, improved planning, marketing, and financial practices
50000Net income gains by producers adopting Extension-recommended best management practices, including those practices related to husbandry, improved planning, marketing, and financial practices
13Number of animal producers implementing Extension-recommended best management practices for animal waste management
20Number of waste management certifications gained or maintained due to Extension education efforts
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Producers will increase sales of food locally to more agriculturally aware consumers through market development, producer and consumer education, and new farmer and infrastructure support.

Value* Outcome Description
9Number of adults (including producers, food business owners, etc.) who improved knowledge of local food and agricultural systems.
6Number of producers who improve local food marketing skills or knowledge.
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Agricultural producers, workers, food handlers and consumers will adopt safer food and agricultural production, handling, and distribution practices that reduce workplace and home injuries/illnesses, enhance food security, and increase the quality and safety of food that North Carolinians prepare and consume.

Value* Outcome Description
67Number of food service employees receiving ServSafe certification
60TOTAL number of food handlers receiving food safety training and education in safe food handling practices (new required data for federal reporting)
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
56Number of participants implementing ServSafe
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Individuals and groups will acquire leadership and decision making capacities needed to guide and actively participate in local and state organizations.

Value* Outcome Description
18Number of adults increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
18Number of adults assuming new/expanded leadership roles in the community
35Number of youth increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
6Number of youth assuming new/expanded leadership roles in the community
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
18Number of adults increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
5Number of adults assuming new/expanded leadership roles in the community
35Number of youth increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
6Number of youth assuming new/expanded leadership roles in the community
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Futures that Work: School to Career Pathways

Value* Outcome Description
79Number of teachers trained in 4-H STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) curriculum
466Number of youth (students) increasing knowledge in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math)
225Total number of female participants in STEM program
466Number of youth (students) participating in 4-H dropout prevention (student at-risk) programs
1Number of high school age youth (students) participating as members of 4-H clubs
4Number of high school age youth (students) participating as members in 4-H clubs that have dropped out of high school
466Number of youth (students) increasing knowledge of career/employability skills
466Number of adults increasing knowledge of career/employability skills
5Number of youth (students) increasing knowledge of entrepreneurship
5Number of adults increasing knowledge of entrepreneurship
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
16Number of teachers using 4-H STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) curriculum in their classrooms
466Number of youth (students) gaining knowledge in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math)
466Number of youth (students) gaining career / employability skills
18Number of adults gaining career / employability skills
5Number of youth (students) gaining entrepreneurship skills
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Consumers and communities will enhance the value of plants, animals, and landscapes while conserving valuable natural resources and protecting the environment.

Value* Outcome Description
65Number of participants improving knowledge, attitude, skills and aspirations regarding gardening and landscape practices including plant selection and placement, turfgrass management, soil management, growing food, water conservation and water quality preservation, storm water and erosion management, green waste management, pest and wildlife management
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
65Number of participants who use extension-recommended best management practices in landscapes, turf, and gardens, including pest (insect, weed, disease) management, fertility management, water conservation, water quality preservation and pruning techniques
13000Total cost savings from the use of extension-recommended best management practices in landscapes, turf, and gardens, including pest (insect, weed, disease) management, fertility management, water conservation, water quality preservation and pruning techniques
36Number of participants selecting appropriate landscape plants (adapted, drought tolerant, appropriate size, etc.)
4500Cost savings from the appropriate selection of landscape plants
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Youth and adult program participants will make healthy food choices, achieve the recommended amount of physical activity and reduce risk factors for chronic diseases.

Value* Impact Description
180Number of adults increasing their fruit and vegetables consumption
132Number of youth increasing their fruit and vegetable consumption
245Number of participants increasing their physical activity
11Number of adults who reduce their blood pressure
5Number of adults who improve their blood glucose (A1c.)level
8Number of adults who reduce their total cholesterol
11Number of participants who consume less sodium in their diet
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

IV. Number of Contacts Made by Extension

Type of ContactNumber
Face-to-face* 9,585
Non face-to-face** 5,622
Total by Extension staff in 2017 15,207
* Face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make directly with individuals through one-on-one visits, meetings, and other activities where staff members work directly with individuals.
** Non face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make indirectly with individuals by telephone, email, newsletters, news articles, radio, television, and other means.

V. Designated Grants Received by Extension

Type of GrantAmount
Contracts/Grants $0.00
Gifts/Donations $1,200.00
In-Kind Grants/Donations $336.00
United Way/Foundations $10,500.00
User Fees $7,505.00
Total $19,541.00

VI. Volunteer Involvement in Extension Programs

Number of Volunteers* Number of Volunteer Hours Known client contacts by volunteers Dollar Value at 24.69
4-H: 308 602 6,494 $ 14,863.00
Advisory Leadership System: 23 21 9 $ 518.00
Extension Community Association: 18 70 274 $ 1,728.00
Extension Master Gardener: 10 65 62 $ 1,605.00
Other: 90 630 1,677 $ 15,555.00
Total: 449 1388 8516 $ 34,270.00
* The number of volunteers reflects the overall number of volunteers for multiple events.

VII. Membership of Advisory Leadership System

Scotland County Extension Advisory Council
Brenda Gilbert
Gray Gilbert
Leon Butler
Dorothy Tyson
Beatrice Sams
Joe Barnhill
Joann Barnhill
Ida Stewart
Steve Herlocker
April Snead
Scotland County 4-H Advisory Committee
Sommore Terry
Mikiko Fludd
Dot Coble
Johnie Gorham
Shaunee McLaurin (youth)
Iris Hamilton
Daniel bridges (youth)
Kathie Cox
Sharon Davis
angela stephens
dorothy tyson

Family and Consumer Sciences Advisory Committee
Mitchell McIver
Corniela Mceachin
Kathie Cox
Doris Graham
Noren Sanford
jennifer Byrd
sandra alford

VIII. Staff Membership

Randy Wood
Title: County Extension Director
Phone: (910) 277-2422
Email: randy_wood@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Livestock and Forages

Carol Capel-Baldwin
Title: County Extension Administrative Assistant
Phone: (910) 277-2422
Email: carol_capel@ncsu.edu

Sharon English
Title: Extension Agent, Family and Consumer Sciences
Phone: (910) 277-2422
Email: sharon_english@ncsu.edu

Angela Galloway
Title: Extension Agent, 4-H Youth Development
Phone: (910) 277-2422
Email: angela_galloway@ncsu.edu

Richard Goforth
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Poultry
Phone: (704) 283-3801
Email: richard_goforth@ncsu.edu

Marissa Herchler
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Animal Food Safety (FSMA Programs)
Phone: (919) 515-5396
Email: marissa_herchler@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Marissa is an Area Specialized Agent for animal food safety, with emphasis on the new Food Safety Modernization Act rules, as they apply to feed mills in North Carolina. Please contact Marissa with any FSMA related questions, or PCQI training inquiries.

Stacey Jones
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Commercial Nursery and Greenhouse
Phone: (704) 920-3310
Email: stacey_jones@ncsu.edu

Colby Lambert
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Forestry
Phone: (910) 814-6041
Email: colby_lambert@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provides educational opportunities and technical support to forest landowners, agents, and forest industry in eastern North Carolina.

Bill Lord
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Water Resources
Phone: (919) 496-3344
Email: william_lord@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Water quality education and technical assistance

Rachel McDowell
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Consumer and Retail Food Safety
Phone: (919) 515-9155
Email: romcdowe@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Support FCS Agents in delivering timely and evidence-based food safety education and information to stakeholders in NC.

Hazel McPhatter
Title: EFNEP Educator, Extension Program Associate
Phone: (910) 277-2422
Email: hazel_mcphatter@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Nutrition Program Associate 4-H EFNEP. Provides nutrition education for Scotland County youth.

Shannon Newton
Title: Area Agent, Agriculture - Horticulture
Phone: (910) 875-3461
Email: shannon_newton@ncsu.edu

Currey Nobles
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Food Safety
Phone: (919) 515-9520
Email: canobles@ncsu.edu

Elena Rogers
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Food Safety - Fresh Produce Western NC
Phone: (828) 352-2519
Email: elena_rogers@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provide educational programs, training and technical support focusing on fresh produce safety to Agents and growers in Western NC.

Allan Thornton
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Commercial Vegetables and Fruits
Phone: (910) 592-7161
Email: allan_thornton@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Vegetable Extension Specialist. Conducts Extension and applied research programs for commercial vegetable and fruit growers and agents in eastern North Carolina.

Mitch Woodward
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Watersheds and Water Quality
Phone: (919) 250-1112
Email: mdwoodwa@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: NC Cooperative Extension's Goals include: - NC's natural resources and environmental quality will be protected, conserved and enhanced. - NC will have profitable, environmentally sustainable plant, animal and food systems. Protecting our environmental resources, particularly drinking water quality, is a top priority in NC. NC Cooperative Extension is a leader in teaching, researching, and accelerating the adoption of effective water quality protection practices.

IX. Contact Information

Scotland County Center
231 E Cronly St
Suite 800
Laurinburg, NC 28352

Phone: (910) 277-2422
Fax: (910) 277-2426
URL: http://scotland.ces.ncsu.edu