2017 Stanly County Program Impact Report

Approved: January 23, 2018

I. Executive Summary

Cooperative Extension programs in Stanly County are proactive in addressing issues identified by the Extension Advisory Board and seven advisory program committees led by Extension Agents within the areas of agriculture, foods, and 4-H Youth Development. Following is a summary of impacts in 2017 resulting from the development and implementation of programs by Extension Agents.

Agriculture – 802 Agricultural producers (producer numbers are duplicated due to multiple workshop/field day participation) were assisted through Extension programs to help them become more profitable and sustainable through increased knowledge of best management practices. 41 field crop growers and 424 livestock producers (duplications included) adopted best management practices as a result of Extension programs and recommendations.

Addressing safe and secure food and farms systems were accomplished by offering educational opportunities for private and commercial pesticide applicators to receive re-certification credits. In Stanly County, 78 private and commercial pesticide applicators earned the required hours they need in order to maintain their pesticide license. An additional 175 private and commercial pesticide applicators from surrounding counties participated in training opportunities offered by Stanly County Ag Agents. These pesticide licenses enable applicators to use pesticides in accordance with NC Department of Agriculture and Consumer Science regulations in an efficient and environmentally sound manner.

Foods – 1,487 youth and adults participated in programming addressing healthy eating, physical activity, and chronic disease risk reduction. These programs were conducted through a variety of activities that included: Steps to Health & Try Healthy - Nutrition Education Programs for third graders; a community garden project; a cooking show on the local cable channel that featured healthy recipes using local ingredients; a food preservation workshop, Speedway to Healthy Exhibit; Go, Glow, Grow nutrition education for preschoolers; Kids in the Kitchen Cooking Camps and Med Instead of Meds Workshops and Cooking Classes. As a result of these programs, 1209 youth and 89 adults reported increasing their fruit and vegetable consumption. 170 participants reported they increased their physical activity. 19 participants reported consuming less sodium in their diets.

4-H Youth Development –Stanly County 4-H program is continuing to offer positive youth development opportunities through both traditional and non-traditional delivery methods. Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) continues to be a 4-H program focus. In 2017, 18 teachers were trained in 4-H STEM curriculum; 752 youth reported increasing knowledge in STEM.

In 2017, participation in programs involved 10,451 citizens in direct services, events, and activities. Another 28,703 citizens were indirectly contacted by telephone calls, e-mails, newsletters, and direct mailings. Informal educational opportunities for youth and adults were provided through non-credit classes. Agents secured grants, generated user fees along with gifts and donations in the amount of $21,746 in addition to local and state dollars.

Volunteers are essential to increase the impact of what Cooperative Extension does in the county because they continue to extend the outreach of the Extension staff. During 2017, there were 348 volunteers providing 34,367 hours of their time valued at $105,419 while providing educational information directly to 8,037 client contacts which extends the outreach of the agents on staff.

II. County Background

Agriculture continues to be a major factor in the local economy with an estimated value of 1.6 billion dollars based on statistics from NC Department of Agriculture & Consumer Services. In addition to the important economic impact of agriculture, preserving farmland is also beneficial because it results in far less cost for services than sprawling residential development. Stanly County is situated in the Central Park Region of North Carolina. Development is fast paced in western Stanly with the opening of Interstate 485 just 11 miles from the county line and the expansion of NC 24/27 Highway from two lanes to four lanes from Charlotte to Albemarle. The Stanly County Land Use Plan, the Voluntary Agriculture District and Enhanced Voluntary Agriculture District (VAD & EVAD) ordinance, and Farmland Protection Plan are important tools assisting leaders in directing the future growth of the county.

2017 Program Area Focus:

Foods - Nutrition and chronic disease management, Food preparation & cooking skills, Food preservation and food safety.

Building Strong Families and Youth - Life skills training for youth and adults.

Increasing Economic Opportunity through Agriculture - Educational programs for farmers and landowners on best management practices and value-added agriculture.

Following identification of the key issues by citizens and community leaders, Extension agents will address these issues following the programming model process of planning, design, implementation and evaluation. Staff will work with the county advisory board and advisory program committees to help identify and reach the target audiences; develop and implement programming strategies; market the educational programs; and evaluate the effectiveness of the programs. Agents will reach the identified audiences through one-on-one visits, educational workshops, demonstrations, and field days as well as through a variety of media outlets.

III. Objectives to Address the Cooperative Extension Long Range Plan

North Carolina's plant production systems will become more profitable and sustainable.
North Carolina's agricultural crops industry makes major contributions to local communities and the state’s economy. In 2014, the estimated farm gate value of crops was $4.72 billion, placing NC as the 17th largest in the nation. North Carolina is one of the most diversified agriculture states in the nation. The state's 50,200 farmers grow over 80 different commodities, utilizing 8.4 million of the state's 31 million acres to furnish consumers a dependable and affordable supply of food and fiber. Tobacco remains one of the state's most predominant farm commodities. North Carolina produces more tobacco and sweet potatoes than any other state and ranks second in Christmas tree cash receipts. The state also produces a significant amount of cucumbers for pickles, lima beans, turnip greens, collard greens, mustard greens, strawberries, bell peppers, blueberries, chili peppers, fresh market cucumbers, snap beans, cabbage, eggplant, watermelons, pecans, peaches, squash, apples, sweet corn, tomatoes, and grapes. There is continual technological change and the relative profitability of individual farm enterprises changes over time; therefore, farmers must respond by modifying their farming operations. Changes in consumer demand create new opportunities for producers. Growth in alternative forms of agriculture will include, among others, organic and niche market production. Educational and training programs for producers of plant agricultural products and services will enhance their ability to achieve financial and lifestyle goals and to enhance economic development locally, regionally and statewide.
Value* Outcome Description
107Number of crop (all plant systems) producers increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, and/or skills as related to: 1. Best management production practices (cultural, nutrient, and genetics) 2. Pest/insect, disease, weed, wildlife management 3. Financial/Farm management tools and practices (business, marketing, government policy, human resources) 4. Alternative agriculture, bioenergy, and value-added enterprises
10Number of Extension initiated and controlled County demonstration test sites (new required for GLF/PSI reporting)
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
41Number of crop (all plant systems) producers adopting best management practices, including those practices related to nutrient management, conservation, production, cultivars, pest management (weeds, diseases, insects), business management, and marketing
521500Net income gains realized by the adoption of best management practices, including those practices related to nutrient management, conservation, production, cultivars, pest management (weeds, diseases, insects), business management, and marketing
36Number of producers reporting increased dollar returns per acre or reduced costs per acre
30Number of producers reporting reduction in fertilizer used per acre
26500Number of acres in conservation tillage or other Best Management Practice
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
North Carolina's animal production systems will become more profitable and sustainable.
North Carolina's livestock industry makes major contributions to local communities and the state’s economy. In 2014, the estimated farm gate value of livestock, dairy, and poultry was $8.85 billion, placing NC as the 7th largest in the nation. Hogs & pigs have historically been an important part of North Carolina agriculture. The industry has changed dramatically since the 1980s from the small farm raising a few hogs to large confinement type operations. North Carolina's number of cattle & calves on farms has remained relatively stable throughout time. Milk cow inventory and milk production have continued to decline in the state. Unlike other commodities, broiler production in North Carolina is increasing throughout the state. There is continual technological change and the relative profitability of individual farm enterprises changes over time; therefore, farmers must respond by modifying their farming operations. Changes in consumer demand create new opportunities for producers. Growth in alternative forms of agriculture will include, among others, organic, niche market production, and pasture-raised livestock. Educational and training programs for producers of animal agricultural products and services will enhance their ability to achieve financial and lifestyle goals and to enhance economic development locally, regionally and statewide.
Value* Outcome Description
695Number of animal producers increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, and/or skills as related to: 1. Best management production practices (cultural, nutrient, and genetics) 2. Pest/insect, disease, weed, wildlife management 3. Financial/Farm management tools and practices (business, marketing, government policy, human resources) 4. Alternative agriculture, bioenergy, and value-added enterprises
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
383Number of animal producers adopting Extension-recommended best management practices, including those practices related to husbandry, improved planning, marketing, and financial practices
57450Net income gains by producers adopting Extension-recommended best management practices, including those practices related to husbandry, improved planning, marketing, and financial practices
16Number of animal producers implementing Extension-recommended best management practices for animal waste management
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Producers will increase sales of food locally to more agriculturally aware consumers through market development, producer and consumer education, and new farmer and infrastructure support.
Farmers will increase their capacity to supply product for local food sales through market planning efforts, producer and consumer education, beginning farmer training programs and local market infrastructure development. The fastest growing area of consumer demand in agriculture continues to be organic. Farmers' markets continue to expand as do multiple efforts in local sustainable agriculture. Nationally, "Buy Local, Buy Fresh" movements have emerged in the face of concerns about the risks involved in long distance transportation of industrialized food production. Increasingly, public officials and business leaders see promotion of local farm products as good public policy and local economic development. Additionally, individuals will learn to supplement their current diet by growing their own fruits and vegetables as individuals or as community groups.
Agricultural producers, workers, food handlers and consumers will adopt safer food and agricultural production, handling, and distribution practices that reduce workplace and home injuries/illnesses, enhance food security, and increase the quality and safety of food that North Carolinians prepare and consume.
Training and educational programs for farmers, agricultural workers, food handlers, and consumers will provide research-based programming, materials, information and expertise to compel these individuals to implement practices relating to the overall safety and security for the food supply and farming systems. Components of this include on-farm, packinghouse, and transportation management, retail and food service establishments, and consumer’s homes. Therefore targeted audiences include farmers and agricultural workers and their families, food handlers and workers (both amateur and commercial), transporters, processors, business operators, food service and retail staff, supervisors of any food facility, long term care facility staff and individuals who purchase, prepare and serve food in their homes. With an estimated 76 million foodborne illnesses annually, costing an estimated $1.4 trillion, food safety highlights a specific area of risk to be addressed by Cooperative Extension. The recent produce-related foodborne illness outbreaks have brought public attention to a problem that has been increasing nationally for the last ten years. The issues of foodborne illness and food safety pose immediate risks for farmers affecting the areas of economics, consumer demand, and market access. Because no processing or kill steps are involved with produce that is typically eaten raw, the best measures to limit microorganisms and fresh produce related illness are to prevent microbes from contaminating the product. Practices like Good Agricultural Practices (GAPs), Good Handling Practices (GHPs), and Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points (HACCP) represent a systematic preventive approach to food safety, protecting agricultural products as they move from farm to retail and restaurants and finally to families. While there is currently no legal requirements for growers to implement GAPs, buyers have responded to the public concern by requiring their produce growers to adhere to current guidelines and possibly even require GAPs certification. The main areas of concern incorporate production, harvesting, packing, and transporting produce in the areas of water quality, manure management, domestic and wildlife management, worker health and hygiene, transportation, traceability, and documentation. For North Carolina growers to be competitive and produce safe product, it is important that they gain knowledge about and implement food safety programs that minimize physical, chemical and biological hazards Food safety risks do not stop at primary production. As risks associated with pathogens can occur at many junctions between primary production and consumption, food safety is a truly farm-to-fork issue. The World Health Organization and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have defined 5 factors that lead to foodborne illness outbreaks: Inadequate cooking or processing procedures; improper storage and holding temperatures, cross-contamination between potentially contaminated raw materials and ready-to-eat foods (either directly or through poor sanitation); and poor implementation of personal hygiene practices. The preventative steps targeting risk reduction taken at each of the components making up the food supply chain are critical in preventing food-borne illness. Educational programs including ServSAFE, School HACCP workshops, food safety at childcare and senior centers, and targeted farm-to-fork food safety inclusion for all food handlers is necessary for important for advances in knowledge and implementation of preventative programs. Equally important is that families and children have a secure food supply. Hunger in American households has risen by 43 percent over the last five years, according to an analysis of US Department of Agriculture (USDA) data released in the report "Household Food Security in the United States, 2004." The analysis, completed by the Center on Hunger and Poverty at Brandeis University, shows that more than 7 million people have joined the ranks of the hungry since 1999. The USDA report says that 38.2 million Americans live in households that suffer directly from hunger and food insecurity, including nearly 14 million children. That figure is up from 31 million Americans in 1999. Limited-resource, socially disadvantaged and food-insecure individuals, families and communities will be provided with information and opportunities to enhance household food, diet and nutritional security. Agriculture is one of the most hazardous industries in the United States, and consistently ranks as the first, second or third most deadly industry along with mining and construction. Agriculture is unique in that the work and home place are often the same, exposing both workers and family members to hazards. In the United States on average each year, there are 700 deaths and 140,000 injuries to those who work in agriculture, defined as farming, forestry and fishing. Farmers, farmworkers and their families are at high risk for fatal and nonfatal injuries (primarily from tractor roll-overs, machinery entanglements, and animal handling incidents), musculo-skeletal conditions, work-related lung diseases, noise-induced hearing loss, heat stress and heat stroke, pesticide exposure and illness, skin diseases, behavioral health issues, and certain cancers associated with chemical use and prolonged sun exposure. The health and safety of migrant and seasonal farmworkers are complicated by other conditions such as infectious disease, hypertension, and diabetes, as well as cultural and language barriers. Farmers and farmworkers alike are subject to lack of access to health care. Agricultural injury and illness are costly, with total US annual costs reaching $4.5 billion and per farm costs equaling $2,500, or 15% of net income. Median health care coverage for farm families is $6,000 per year. In North Carolina, 27% of farm families do not have health insurance, while 29% of farmers do not have health insurance. Many others have health care coverage with high annual deductibles and high premiums. Agromedicine is a comprehensive, collaborative approach involving both agricultural and health scientists to develop solutions addressing the health and safety issues of the agricultural community through research, education and outreach. The North Carolina Agromedicine Institute, a partnership of NC State University, NC A&T State University and East Carolina University in collaboration with others, develops and evaluates effective programs to reduce injury and illness in agriculture, forestry and fishing. One such program is called Certified Safe Farm (CSF) and AgriSafe. CSF and AgriSafe were first developed and researched in Iowa. CSF and AgriSafe are being adapted to North Carolina agriculture by the NC Agromedicine Institute and its Cooperative Extension collaborators. Certified Safe Farm combines AgriSafe health services (wellness and occupational health screenings and personal protection equipment selection and fit services) conducted by trained AgriSafe health providers, on-farm safety reviews conducted by trained Extension agents, and community education and outreach to achieve safety and health goals established by participating farmers and their employees and families. Insurance incentives and safety equipment cost-share programs for participating farmers are still being developed. Other ongoing educational programs addressing agricultural health and safety include farm safety days for children, youth, or families, employee hands-on farm safety training, the National Safe Tractor and Machinery Operation Program for youth, and youth ATV operator safety certification programs.
Value* Outcome Description
253Number of commercial/public operators trained
26Number of pesticide application credit hours provided
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
160Number of participants that have adopted farm safety practices
5376Value of number of non-lost work days
2Number of persons certified in Good Agricultural Practices (GAPs) or Good Handling Practices (GHPs)
4900Value of reduced risk of farm and food hazards
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Futures that Work: School to Career Pathways
We are living in a new economy powered by technology, fueled by information and driven by knowledge. Extension programs provide opportunities for youth and adults to improve their level of education and increase their skills that enable them to be competitive in our global society and workforce.
Value* Outcome Description
18Number of teachers trained in 4-H STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) curriculum
752Number of youth (students) increasing knowledge in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math)
362Total number of female participants in STEM program
3Number of high school age youth (students) participating as members of 4-H clubs
27Number of youth (students) increasing knowledge of career/employability skills
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
18Number of teachers using 4-H STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) curriculum in their classrooms
38Number of youth (students) gaining knowledge in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math)
27Number of youth (students) gaining career / employability skills
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Youth and adult program participants will make healthy food choices, achieve the recommended amount of physical activity and reduce risk factors for chronic diseases.
Many North Carolinians are affected by chronic disease and conditions that compromise their quality of life and well-being. Heart disease, stroke and cancer continue to be leading causes of death in our state. In addition, obesity and obesity related chronic diseases such as diabetes continue to rise at alarming rates. Healthy eating and physical activity are critical to achieve optimal health. Many North Carolinians have diets that are too high in calories and too low in fruits, vegetables and whole grains. Portion sizes, foods eaten away-from-home and consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages continue to rise. In addition, most North Carolinians do not engage in regular physical activity. The prevalence of overweight and obesity has nearly doubled in the past 10 years. If the trend of overweight is not slowed, it will eliminate the progress we have made in reducing the burden of weigh-related chronic disease. One in every three US children born after 2000 will become diabetic unless many more people start eating less and exercising more. The cost of obesity in North Carolina in health care costs alone is over 2 billion dollars. There are many proposed reasons for the obesity epidemic, however unhealthy eating and physical inactivity are widely recognizes as primary contributors to the problem. Those who make healthy food choices and are physically active are more likely to achieve and maintain a healthy weight as well reduce chronic diseases. Ultimately, this will lead to reduction in health care costs, increased longevity, greater productivity and improved quality of life.
Value* Impact Description
89Number of adults increasing their fruit and vegetables consumption
1209Number of youth increasing their fruit and vegetable consumption
170Number of participants increasing their physical activity
19Number of participants who consume less sodium in their diet
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

IV. Number of Contacts Made by Extension

Type of ContactNumber
Face-to-face* 10,451
Non face-to-face** 28,703
Total by Extension staff in 2017 39,154
* Face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make directly with individuals through one-on-one visits, meetings, and other activities where staff members work directly with individuals.
** Non face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make indirectly with individuals by telephone, email, newsletters, news articles, radio, television, and other means.

V. Designated Grants Received by Extension

Type of GrantAmount
Contracts/Grants $0.00
Gifts/Donations $14,130.00
In-Kind Grants/Donations $2,271.00
United Way/Foundations $3,400.00
User Fees $1,945.00
Total $21,746.00

VI. Volunteer Involvement in Extension Programs

Number of Volunteers* Number of Volunteer Hours Known client contacts by volunteers Dollar Value at 24.14
4-H: 106 628 2,321 $ 15,160.00
Advisory Leadership System: 0 0 0 $ 0.00
Extension Community Association: 18 2,729 2,502 $ 65,878.00
Extension Master Gardener: 18 165 1,249 $ 3,983.00
Other: 206 845 1,965 $ 20,398.00
Total: 348 4367 8037 $ 105,419.00
* The number of volunteers reflects the overall number of volunteers for multiple events.

VII. Membership of Advisory Leadership System

Stanly County Advisory Council
Joyce Whitley
Ellen McCarter
Vicki Coggins
Kathy Almond
Miriam Cranford
Curtis Furr
B. A. Smith, Jr.
Tammy Albertson
Becky Weemhoff
Jeanette Eatman
Joseph Burleson
Jennifer Almond
Michael Harwood
Kelley Bigger
Amy Austin
Katie Furr
Food & Nutrition Advisory Committee
Kelley Biggers
Jennifer Layton
Stefanie Almond
Kayla Shomaker
Carolyn Davis
Bill Baldwin
Aleshia Holland
Daniel Harkey
Denise Smith
Michelle Peifer
Andre Burroughs
Oliver Webster
Tri-County Crops Advisory Committee (Stanly County Members)
Curtis Furr
Butch Brooks
Keith Hill
Larry Coley
Beef Cattle Advisory Committee
Arnold Vanhoy
Brooke Harward
Ken Barbee
Jim Cameron
Kyle Almond
Todd Little
Laura Troutman
Dennis Mabry
Joe Mabry
Frank Simpson
Stanly County Youth Livestock and Poultry Advisory Committee
Brooke Harward
Natalee Smith
Lanny Burleson
Sid Fields
Tessa Burleson
Catherine Harward
Area Poultry Advisory Committee - Stanly County Members
Cameron Faulkner
Mark Huneycutt
Rocky River Local Foods Advisory Committee
Kent Lowder
TJ Kuleba
Gabe Lowder
Joe Stegall
Gary Sikes
Bradley Todd

4-H Youth Development Advisory Committee
Kelley Biggers
Susan Brooks
Vicki Calvert
Kacie Hatley
Amie Huneycutt
Judith Lynch

VIII. Staff Membership

Lori Ivey
Title: County Extension Director
Phone: (704) 983-3987
Email: lori_ivey@ncsu.edu

Dustin Adcock
Title: Extension Agent, Agriculture- Field Crops & Horticulture
Phone: (704) 983-3987
Email: dustin_adcock@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Dustin Adcock serves Stanly County as the Field Crops and horticulture Extension Agent. His expertise is in horticulture, soil health, field crops, season extension, education, marketing, and communications.

Christian
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Consumer & Retail Food Safety
Phone: (919) 515-9148
Email: Candice_Christian@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: The overall goal of the Area Specialized Agents (ASAs) in Consumer & Retail Food Safety is to support FCS Agents in delivering timely and evidence-based food safety education and information to stakeholders in North Carolina.

Marti Day
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Dairy
Phone: (919) 542-8202
Email: marti_day@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Responsible for educational programs for dairy farmers, youth with an interest in dairy projects and the general public with an interest in dairy foods and the dairy industry.

Lisa Forrest
Title: County Extension Administrative Assistant
Phone: (704) 983-3987
Email: lisa_mauldin@ncsu.edu

Samantha Foster
Title: Extension Agent, Agriculture - Livestock
Phone: (704) 983-3987
Email: slfoster@ncsu.edu

Richard Goforth
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Poultry
Phone: (704) 283-3801
Email: richard_goforth@ncsu.edu

Kacie Hatley
Title: Extension Agent, 4-H Youth Development
Phone: (704) 983-3987
Email: klhatle2@ncsu.edu

Marissa Herchler
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Animal Food Safety (FSMA Programs)
Phone: (919) 515-5396
Email: marissa_herchler@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Marissa is an Area Specialized Agent for animal food safety, with emphasis on the new Food Safety Modernization Act rules, as they apply to feed mills in North Carolina. Please contact Marissa with any FSMA related questions, or PCQI training inquiries.

Cortney Huneycutt
Title: Nutrition Program Assistant
Phone: (704) 983-3987
Email: clhuneyc@ncsu.edu

Stacey Jones
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Commercial Nursery and Greenhouse
Phone: (704) 920-3310
Email: stacey_jones@ncsu.edu

Bill Lord
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Water Resources
Phone: (919) 496-3344
Email: william_lord@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Water quality education and technical assistance

Currey Nobles
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Food Safety
Phone: (919) 515-9520
Email: canobles@ncsu.edu

Elena Rogers
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Food Safety - Fresh Produce Western NC
Phone: (828) 352-2519
Email: elena_rogers@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provide educational programs, training and technical support focusing on fresh produce safety to Agents and growers in Western NC.

Allan Thornton
Title: Extension Associate
Phone: (910) 592-7161
Email: allan_thornton@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Vegetable Extension Specialist. Conducts Extension and applied research programs for commercial vegetable and fruit growers and agents in eastern North Carolina.

Mitch Woodward
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Watersheds and Water Quality
Phone: (919) 250-1112
Email: mdwoodwa@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: NC Cooperative Extension's Goals include: - NC's natural resources and environmental quality will be protected, conserved and enhanced. - NC will have profitable, environmentally sustainable plant, animal and food systems. Protecting our environmental resources, particularly drinking water quality, is a top priority in NC. NC Cooperative Extension is a leader in teaching, researching, and accelerating the adoption of effective water quality protection practices.

IX. Contact Information

Stanly County Center
26032-E Newt Rd
Albemarle, NC 28001

Phone: (704) 983-3987
Fax: (704) 983-3303
URL: http://stanly.ces.ncsu.edu