2019 Stokes County Program Impact Report

Approved: January 16, 2020

I. Executive Summary

Stokes County Cooperative Extension was proud to serve the citizens of Stokes County in 2019 by addressing issues and needs identified by advisory groups, existing clients, and community partners. This year, the Stokes County staff had a total of 5,554 face-to-face contacts with county residents, which represents more than a 25% increase from the prior year. In addition, through newsletters, direct mailings, mass media outlets, social media, and other digital methods, over 205,000 indirect contacts were made with clientele.

Stokes County Cooperative Extension impacts agricultural initiatives through their support of row crop farmers, local farmer's markets, livestock and forage producers, and both commercial and home horticulture producers throughout the county. In 2019, 58 crop producers adopted best management practices, including those practices related to nutrient management, conservation, production, cultivars, pest management (weeds, diseases, insects), business management, and marketing. In addition, 164 animal producers adopted Extension-recommended best management practices and production changes related to nutrition, ration balancing, mineral supplement, breeding, and reproduction in 2019. Timely and relevant education by our Agricultural Agents has included on-farm demonstrations, community and school garden programs, pruning demonstrations, information on fruit and vegetable production, value-added product information, alternative enterprises, farm tours, and special outreach events.

The 4-H Agent works extensively with community clubs, volunteers, students, and educators. In 2019, 6 clubs were maintained across the county, with 97 youth increasing knowledge of life skills; and an additional 165 participating in 4-H special interest programs. Extensive partnerships with the Stokes County school System enhance Cooperative Extension’s efforts throughout the county. As a result of 4-H school curriculum offerings, 376 youth increased knowledge in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math), and an additional 453 increased knowledge of natural resources and environmental issues.

The Family and Consumer Sciences Agent assisted county residents through programs related to nutrition and wellness. Programs assist residents with making healthy diet choices, increasing physical activity, working toward chronic disease risk reduction strategies, and making sound parenting decisions. In 2019, 115 individuals increased their knowledge of safe home food handling, preservation, or preparation practices. In addition, through partnerships between Cooperative Extension and community stakeholders, over 300 pounds of local food was donated for consumption by vulnerable populations across Stokes County.

Agents taught or facilitated 84 workshops, demonstrations, and other presentations, which resulted in 440 hours of educational programming providing information and resources to an audience of more than 2,517 citizens.

Additionally, over 106 volunteers extended the outreach efforts of Cooperative Extension programming by contributing 1,161 volunteer hours. These hours are conservatively valued at $25.43 an hour and totaled $29,526.

The Stokes County staff also generated $18,911 from grants, donations, and other in-kind sources in an effort to extent programming to more citizens across Stokes County, and supplement appropriated County funds.

These are just some of the highlights that Stokes County Cooperative Extension had in 2019 to serve residents across the County.

II. County Background

Stokes County is a rural county located in the central Piedmont region of the state, North of Winston Salem, on the Virginia-North Carolina state line. The people in Stokes County live in a beautiful region which contains a small east-west traversing mountain range within its borders. It is the location of Hanging Rock State Park and the Dan River flows through the county affording a wealth of outdoor recreation opportunities for its citizens and many visitors. The county is 456 square miles and has a population of 46,588 people, which 94% are white, 5% are black, 2.7% Hispanic and .3% American Indian.

Agriculture remains an important industry supplying $59 million in gross domestic product and providing 23% of the local jobs. NC Cooperative Extension Stokes Center will work with local government groups to promote agricultural needs and benefits.

Stokes County has a large number of small and limited resource farmers that are looking for outlets to sell their products. The office will work as a team to ensure the success of a new farmers market that takes place during youth sports at the county’s largest regional sports venue, providing parents with convenient access to local produce and providing a market for new or transitioning farmers.

In 2019, we shall continue Stokes County youth attending a 4-H camp and other regional and state events with sponsorship support for youth We will continue to seek out opportunities to address educational deficits through partnerships and innovative ideas to serve our youth.

Family and Consumer Sciences will seek out opportunities to address emerging educational needs for families and find partnerships to produce healthier families and communities. Faithful families programming will continue and be expanded to serve different areas in the county. Other programming opportunities will be sought out to provide access for all Stokes county families to improve health through education.

Stokes county farmers have several needs that need to be addressed. Livestock producers will be offered forage improvement education through multiple modes as well as opportunities for finding diversified marketing options to improve revenue. Horticultural production will receive support through pesticides classes, improved marketing options, and one on one support for production issues.

NC Cooperative Extension Stokes Center will focus on the above needs and issues, but will continue to be forward looking and thinking in identifying emerging needs and determining solutions for those needs.

III. Objectives to Address the Cooperative Extension Long Range Plan

Our family and consumer sciences programs improve the well-being of individuals, families, and communities.

Value* Outcome Description
25Number of adults and professionals increasing their knowledge of human development over the life course and emerging best practices in parenting and caregiving
25Number of parents and other caregivers of children increasing their knowledge of positive parenting practices (such as communication and discipline)
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Our plant production programs improve production, profitability, and sustainability of the agriculture sector.

Value* Outcome Description
23Number of producers who gain skills or knowledge to increase production for local markets.
10Number of producers who improve local food marketing skills or knowledge.
181Number of pesticide applicators receiving continuing education credits
22Number of pesticide credit hours provided
147Number of crop (all plant systems) producers increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, and/or skills as related to: 1. Best management production practices (cultural, nutrient, and genetics) 2. Pest/insect, disease, weed, wildlife management 3. Financial/Farm management tools and practices (business, marketing, government policy, human resources) 4. Alternative agriculture, bioenergy, and value-added enterprises
2Number of Extension initiated and controlled county demonstration test sites
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
4Number of producers (and other members of the local food supply chain) who have increased revenue
4Number of new farms (beginning farmers) selling into local markets for local consumption (in this reporting period)
8Number of participants that have adopted farm safety practices
2Number of acres in conservation tillage or other Best Management Practice
58Number of crop (all plant systems) producers adopting best management practices, including those practices related to nutrient management, conservation, production, cultivars, pest management (weeds, diseases, insects), business management, and marketing
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Our animal production programs improve production, profitability, and sustainability of the agriculture sector.

Value* Outcome Description
4Number of producers who improve local food marketing skills or knowledge.
62Number of producers who gain skills or knowledge to increase production for local markets.
62Number of animal producers who increased knowledge of farm business management, business planning, financial management, marketing, or estate planning.
180Number of animal producers who learned how to develop a management plan (i.e. grazing plan, feeding plan, drought plan, business plan, disaster plan, etc.)
188Number of producers who increased knowledge of pasture/forage management practices (field improvement, herbicide management, grazing season extension, weed control, forage quality, haylage production, nitrate testing, etc.)
192Number of producers who increased knowledge of nutrition, ration balancing, mineral supplements, breeding, and reproduction
12Number of producers who increased knowledge of the strategies to promote animal health and welfare and reduce the potential for infectious diseases through proper use of vaccines, biosecurity, detection and identification of common diseases, appropriate use of animal medications, and mitigation of antimicrobial resistance transmission
23Number of producers who increased knowledge of how to prepare, mitigate, and recover from natural disasters impacting animal agriculture
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
62Number of producers who diversified their marketing strategies into local markets (direct, intermediated/food service, institutional).
167Number of producers (and other members of the local food supply chain) who have increased revenue
66Number of producers adopting extension-recommended practices related to planning, marketing, and financial management
350Number of acres where Extension-recommended nutrient applications were used
4Number of producers who adopted Extension-recommended best management practices and production changes related to quality assurance (vaccinations, castration, culling techniques, etc.)
3Number of producers who adopted Extension-recommended best management practices and production changes related to genetic improvement (AI, heifer/bull selection)
161Number of producers who adopted Extension-recommended best management practices and production changes related to nutrition (mineral, feed rations)
62Number of producers who adopted Extension-recommended best management practices and production changes related to internal parasite management (fecals, deworming)
165Number of producers who adopted Extension-recommended best management practices related to pasture management
164Number of producers who adopted Extension-recommended best management practices and production changes related to nutrition, ration balancing, mineral supplement, breeding, and reproduction
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Our community development programs build strong and thriving communities.

Value* Outcome Description
90Number of participants who improved knowledge of local food and agricultural systems
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Our 4-H youth development programs grow the skills young people need to succeed in life and career.

Value* Outcome Description
17Number of teachers trained in 4-H STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) curriculum
376Number of youth (students) increasing knowledge in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math)
202Total number of female participants in STEM program
6Number of high school age youth (students) participating as members of 4-H clubs
97Number of youth increasing knowledge of life skills
30Number of youth increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
453Number of youth demonstrating increased knowledge of natural resources and environmental issues
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
6Number of teachers using 4-H STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) curriculum in their classrooms
93Number of youth (students) gaining career / employability skills
156Number of youth using effective life skills
103Number of youth increasing their fruit and vegetable consumption
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Our food safety and nutrition programs create a safer and more sustainable food supply and improve the health and nutrition of individuals, families, and our communities.

Value* Outcome Description
115Number of participants who increase their knowledge of safe home food handling, preservation, or preparation practices
21Number of food handlers who increase their knowledge and skills in safe food handling practices
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
1Number of new and existing access points for consumers that expand or improve their offering of local fruits and vegetables. Access points include farmers markets, retail stores, school food programs, community gardens, institutions other than schools (e.g. hospitals, universities, etc.), and other systems/access points not noted (e.g. restaurants, etc.).
2Number of participants developing food safety plans
35Number of adults increasing their fruit and vegetables consumption
300Number of pounds of local food donated for consumption by vulnerable populations
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

IV. Number of Contacts Made by Extension

Type of ContactNumber
Face-to-face* 5,554
Non face-to-face** 205,101
Total by Extension staff in 2019 210,655
* Face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make directly with individuals through one-on-one visits, meetings, and other activities where staff members work directly with individuals.
** Non face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make indirectly with individuals by telephone, email, newsletters, news articles, radio, television, and other means.

V. Designated Grants Received by Extension

Type of GrantAmount
Contracts/Grants $0.00
Gifts/Donations $10,229.81
In-Kind Grants/Donations $0.00
United Way/Foundations $7,692.26
User Fees $989.00
Total $18,911.07

VI. Volunteer Involvement in Extension Programs

Number of Volunteers* Number of Volunteer Hours Known client contacts by volunteers Dollar Value at 25.43
4-H 60 69 0 $ 1,755.00
Advisory Leadership System 10 4 0 $ 102.00
Extension Master Gardener 15 1013 235 $ 25,761.00
Other: Agriculture 20 61 0 $ 1,551.00
Other: Community, Family & Individual Development 1 14 23 $ 356.00
Total: 106 1161 258 $ 29,524.00
* The number of volunteers reflects the overall number of volunteers for multiple events.

VII. Membership of Advisory Leadership System

Extension Advisory Leadership Council
Sue Mitchell
Sue Jarvis
John Barnes
Joan Barnes
Jay Mitchell
Sharon Hartman
Brad Rice
Rick Morris
Horticulture Advisory Committee
Wayne Flippen
Don Bennett
Ron Simmons
Jay Mitchell
Ray Tugel
Cheryl Ferguson
Livestock and Forages Advisory Committee
Austin Armstrong
Jessica Armstrong
Mark Bray
Marilynn Lankford
Ronnie Lankford
Darryl Lester
Tilda Lindsey
Jerry Mitchell
Clay Tuttle

VIII. Staff Membership

Emily Cope
Title: County Extension Director
Phone: (336) 593-8179
Email: emily_cope@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: County Extension Director, small ruminant specialist

Jonas Asbill
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Livestock - Poultry
Phone: (336) 318-6000
Email: jonas_asbill@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Serving the poultry industry across 20 counties in the North Central and Northeast districts

Marti Day
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Dairy
Phone: (919) 542-8202
Email: marti_day@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Responsible for educational programs for dairy farmers, youth with an interest in dairy projects and the general public with an interest in dairy foods and the dairy industry.

Taylor Furr
Title: Extension Agent, 4-H Youth Development
Phone: (336) 593-8179
Email: taylor_furr@ncsu.edu

Tim Hambrick
Title: Area Agent, Agriculture
Phone: (336) 703-2857
Email: tim_hambrick@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Area Field Crop Agent for Forsyth, Stokes, and Surry, and Yadkin counties. Responsibilities include educational programming and research in flue cured tobacco, corn, small grain, and soybean production.

Bryan Hartman
Title: Extension Agent, Agriculture and Natural Resources
Phone: (336) 593-8179
Email: bkhartman@ncat.edu
Brief Job Description: Stokes County programs include commercial vegetable & fruit production, high tunnel crop production, beekeeping and pollination, and harvesting and handling fresh produce. The Extension Agent is responsible for non-formal education and farm demonstrations in appropriate technology, best management practices, high tunnel fruit and vegetable production, horticulture, marketing, and leveraging community collaboration.

Marissa Herchler
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Animal Food Safety (FSMA Programs)
Phone: (919) 515-5396
Email: marissa_herchler@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Marissa is an Area Specialized Agent for animal food safety, with emphasis on the new Food Safety Modernization Act rules, as they apply to feed mills in North Carolina. Please contact Marissa with any FSMA related questions, or PCQI training inquiries.

Stacey Jones
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Commercial Nursery and Greenhouse
Phone: (704) 920-3310
Email: stacey_jones@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: I work with commercial greenhouses and nurseries to help them with growing related issues. These issues range from pests (insect, disease, and weeds), substrates, nutrition, and other miscellaneous topics.

Peggie Lewis Joyce
Title: Area 4-H Agent - Central Region
Phone: (336) 242-2080
Email: peggie_lewis@ncsu.edu

Nathan Kiger
Title: Extension Agent, Agriculture - Livestock & Forages
Phone: (336) 593-8179
Email: nathan_kiger@ncsu.edu

Craig Mauney
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Commercial Vegetables and Fruits
Phone: (828) 684-3562
Email: craig_mauney@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provides educational opportunities, training and technical support to commercial fruit and vegetable growers, agents, and industry in Western NC. (My office is located at the Mountain Horticulture Crops Research and Extension Center not the Henderson County Extension Center as is noted by IT on this website. Please do not contact the Henderson County Extension Center as I am not located there.)

Amy McKenzie
Title: County Extension Administrative Assistant
Phone: (336) 593-8179
Email: amy_mckenzie@ncsu.edu

Currey Nobles
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Food Safety
Phone: (919) 515-9520
Email: canobles@ncsu.edu

Elena Rogers
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Food Safety - Fresh Produce Western NC
Phone: (828) 352-2519
Email: elena_rogers@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provide educational programs, training and technical support focusing on fresh produce safety to Agents and growers in Western NC.

Patti Snyder
Title: Extension Agent, Family and Consumer Sciences
Phone: (336) 593-8179
Email: pebruce@ncsu.edu

Mitch Woodward
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Watersheds and Water Quality
Phone: (919) 414-3873
Email: mdwoodwa@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: NC Cooperative Extension's Goals include: - NC's natural resources and environmental quality will be protected, conserved and enhanced. - NC will have profitable, environmentally sustainable plant, animal and food systems. Protecting our environmental resources, particularly drinking water quality, is a top priority in NC. NC Cooperative Extension is a leader in teaching, researching, and accelerating the adoption of effective water quality protection practices.

IX. Contact Information

Stokes County Center
700 N Main St
Danbury, NC 27016

Phone: (336) 593-8179
Fax: (336) 593-8790
URL: http://stokes.ces.ncsu.edu