2018 Stokes County Program Impact Report

Approved: January 25, 2019

I. Executive Summary

NC Cooperative Extension in Stokes County has had a highly productive year with the hiring of two new agents and forging new partnerships in broader service to Stokes citizens. Family and Consumer Science needs were addressed with a new FCS agent and horticultural needs were addressed with a new Agriculture and Natural resources agent. This year, a total of 37,884 county residents were served by programming, face-to-face contacts, or other means which more than doubles the prior year.

Stokes County 4-H added a new club this year increasing accessibility of 4-H services to a broader base of youth. 4-H Summer Fun program saw expanded use with a greater number of participants and several first time participants. Specific learning targets were addressed through a youth training event where youth learned how to cook and properly serve food. The 4-H and FCS agent partnered with a local chef to provide the training and the culminating event will take place in January 2019 with the youth cooking and serving for a “Taste of Stokes” public event.

Stokes county received an Agventures grant for the assembly of a Mobile Poultry Processing Unit that serves both Stokes and the surrounding region. After coming into use in June, citizens processed over $15,000 worth of poultry using the equipment in the second half of the year.

South Stokes FFA members continue strong partnership with NC Cooperative Extension. This year, groups participated in the regional and state cattle working competitions and placed fifth and sixth in the state. Our partnership has also yielded cattle working equipment and a barn where multiple groups of students are afforded learning opportunities from all schools. In 2018, an anatomy and physiology class used the equipment to learn from an area veterinarian how to take blood samples and give injections. Another high school used the equipment to attain Beef Quality Assurance training and certification.

The Stokes County beekeeper's association held its second Bee School with 22 participants and 11 attaining a NC Beekeeper’s certification. This group continues to grow in size and activity and participation in monthly meetings remains very strong. Several participants have expressed interest in forming a 4-H club to build youth learning and involvement.

The Stokes Extension Master Gardener's held its annual training in conjunction with Surry Master Gardener’s in an effort to build relations and partnerships with neighbors across county lines.

These are a few highlights of the growth and direction that NC Cooperative Extension in Stokes County has taken this year to serve Stokes County residents.

II. County Background

Stokes County is a rural county located in the central Piedmont region of the state, North of Winston Salem, on the Virginia-North Carolina state line. The people in Stokes County live in a beautiful region which contains a small east-west traversing mountain range within its borders. It is the location of Hanging Rock State Park and the Dan River flows through the county affording a wealth of outdoor recreation opportunities for its citizens and many visitors. The county is 456 square miles and has a population of 46,588 people, which 94% are white, 5% are black, 2.7% Hispanic and .3% American Indian. In 2014 , Stokes County had an unemployment rate of 4.8% which is down from 6.9% in 2013. It has fallen 4% in just two years which signals an upswing in the regional economy. A large majority, 67% of the citizens commute out of the county for work, and have a median income of $42,703 which is also the trend of the national economy of more jobs but wages are not as high as prior to the great recession. This year's median income is a drop of $6,431.
Stokes County lost a valuable source of tax-based revenue when R.J. Reynolds Tobacco decided to remove its stored tobacco from the large storage warehouses at the south end of the county. The Stokes County Economic Development Director is no longer employed with Stokes County and the Planning Director is now serving a dual role of Planning Director and Economic Development. Agriculture remains an important industry supplying $59 million in gross domestic product and providing 23% of the local jobs. The Stokes Extension Center will be building a strong relationship with the County Manager and Planning Director to keep them abreast of the agriculture industry improvements. Our long standing relationship with Forsyth Tech Stokes Campus will continue as we collaborate on new educational opportunities for offering job seeking skills and training.
The Extension Staff, in consultation with our Extension Advisory Council, local County Government and Specialized Advisory Committees, will continue to communicate and discuss additional areas of concern for the citizens where Extension can focus their attention. We have surveyed our Advisory Council annually and have regular communication with the local County Manager.

Stokes County has a large number of small and limited resource farmers that are looking for outlets to sell their products. Work shall continue to provide support and training for farmers who sell at the King Farmer’s Market and with Carolina Markets on-line marketing program. Additionally, the Master Gardener program will be continued in 2018 having 20 volunteers to work assisting the local center and providing community service and new course offerings to the citizens. The Master Gardener program will take place in the western section of the county in partnership with Surry County to develop regional cohesion among groups.

4-H youth development has added two clubs in 2017 and will continue to seek partners and opportunities to add more. Currently there are 61 youth in traditional 4-H clubs, 256 other one-time event members, and 242 youth served in our summer programming. In 2018, we shall continue Stokes County youth attending a 4-H camp with sponsorship support for youth, and will be include nature activities in summer programming. 4-H will also continue teaching STEM curriculum in elementary schools, outdoor education and robotics, along with many other activities. There is growth for 4-H youth to participate in livestock events through county 4-H clubs and in regional activities.

Pest control continues to be a major issue with horticultural crops. New pesticide chemistry preserves natural enemies by killing a small range of pests. The difficulty is that growers also find that old pests emerging that were once controlled by older, broad-spectrum pesticides. Extension will focus on how to assist growers in managing these emerging old pests, as well as the new ones. Individual site visits and pesticide training classes will be a regular feature of this work. The crops agent will continue to provide producers his time and expertise. The Horticulture agent will regularly work in pesticide management as well.

III. Objectives to Address the Cooperative Extension Long Range Plan

North Carolina's plant production systems will become more profitable and sustainable.

Value* Outcome Description
64Number of crop (all plant systems) producers increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, and/or skills as related to: 1. Best management production practices (cultural, nutrient, and genetics) 2. Pest/insect, disease, weed, wildlife management 3. Financial/Farm management tools and practices (business, marketing, government policy, human resources) 4. Alternative agriculture, bioenergy, and value-added enterprises
0Number of Extension initiated and controlled County demonstration test sites (new required for GLF/PSI reporting)
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
37Number of crop (all plant systems) producers adopting best management practices, including those practices related to nutrient management, conservation, production, cultivars, pest management (weeds, diseases, insects), business management, and marketing
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

North Carolina's animal production systems will become more profitable and sustainable.

Value* Outcome Description
59Number of animal producers increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, and/or skills as related to: 1. Best management production practices (cultural, nutrient, and genetics) 2. Pest/insect, disease, weed, wildlife management 3. Financial/Farm management tools and practices (business, marketing, government policy, human resources) 4. Alternative agriculture, bioenergy, and value-added enterprises
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
34Number of animal producers adopting Extension-recommended best management practices, including those practices related to husbandry, improved planning, marketing, and financial practices
36000Net income gains by producers adopting Extension-recommended best management practices, including those practices related to husbandry, improved planning, marketing, and financial practices
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Producers will increase sales of food locally to more agriculturally aware consumers through market development, producer and consumer education, and new farmer and infrastructure support.

Value* Outcome Description
85Number of producers who gain skills or knowledge to increase production for local markets.
93Number of adults (including producers, food business owners, etc.) who improved knowledge of local food and agricultural systems.
75Number of children/youth who improved knowledge of local food and agricultural systems.
58Number of producers who improve local food marketing skills or knowledge.
21Number of individuals who learn how to prepare local foods, including through use of home food preservation techniques.
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
10Number of new and existing access points for consumers that expand or improve their offering of local fruits and vegetables. Access points include farmers markets, retail stores, school food programs, community gardens, institutions other than schools (e.g. hospitals, universities, etc.), and other systems/access points not noted (e.g. restaurants, etc.).
124Number of producers selling their agricultural products to local markets (direct, intermediated/food service, institutional) for consumption in NC.
37Number of producers who diversified their marketing strategies into local markets (direct, intermediated/food service, institutional).
523950Gross sales of local foods by producers. (Increase in gross sales to be calculated at the state level.)
62Number of producers (and other members of the local food supply chain) who have increased revenue.
33Number of new farms (beginning farmers) selling into local markets for local consumption (in this reporting period).
2Number of new local food value chain businesses, other than farms (in this reporting period).
14Number of individuals who grow food in community gardens.
275Number of pounds of local foods donated for consumption by vulnerable populations.
23Number of individuals who begin home food production by starting to raise backyard livestock.
104Number of pounds of fresh produce donated for consumption by vulnerable populations.
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Youth and adults will address community issues and/or challenges through volunteerism.

Value* Outcome Description
7Number of adult participants acquiring the skills needed to serve as a volunteer
5Number of adult participants reporting aspirations to serve in new or expanded volunteer roles in community
2Number of hours adult volunteer training conducted
7Number new volunteers recruited
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
10Increased number of hours contributed by trained adult volunteers
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Community members, organizations and local government will engage in collaborative dialog and decision-making to build economically, socially and environmentally resilient communities. This will be done through inclusive engagement, partnership building, and/or community planning.

Value* Impact Description
2Number of local food councils in which Extension is involved
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Futures that Work: School to Career Pathways

Value* Outcome Description
14Number of teachers trained in 4-H STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) curriculum
173Number of youth (students) increasing knowledge in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math)
61Total number of female participants in STEM program
121Number of youth (students) increasing knowledge of career/employability skills
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
4Number of teachers using 4-H STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) curriculum in their classrooms
122Number of youth (students) gaining knowledge in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math)
121Number of youth (students) gaining career / employability skills
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Consumers and communities will enhance the value of plants, animals, and landscapes while conserving valuable natural resources and protecting the environment.

Youth and adult program participants will make healthy food choices, achieve the recommended amount of physical activity and reduce risk factors for chronic diseases.

Value* Impact Description
14Number of adults increasing their fruit and vegetables consumption
14Number of participants who consume less sodium in their diet
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

IV. Number of Contacts Made by Extension

Type of ContactNumber
Face-to-face* 4,519
Non face-to-face** 33,338
Total by Extension staff in 2018 37,857
* Face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make directly with individuals through one-on-one visits, meetings, and other activities where staff members work directly with individuals.
** Non face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make indirectly with individuals by telephone, email, newsletters, news articles, radio, television, and other means.

V. Designated Grants Received by Extension

Type of GrantAmount
Contracts/Grants $7,000.00
Gifts/Donations $5,421.00
In-Kind Grants/Donations $1,500.00
United Way/Foundations $9,500.00
User Fees $0.00
Total $23,421.00

VI. Volunteer Involvement in Extension Programs

Number of Volunteers* Number of Volunteer Hours Known client contacts by volunteers Dollar Value at 24.69
4-H: 14 30 8 $ 741.00
Advisory Leadership System: 0 0 0 $ 0.00
Extension Community Association: 0 0 0 $ 0.00
Extension Master Gardener: 12 659 5,035 $ 16,271.00
Other: 7 73 415 $ 1,802.00
Total: 33 762 5458 $ 18,814.00
* The number of volunteers reflects the overall number of volunteers for multiple events.

VII. Membership of Advisory Leadership System

Extension Advisory Leadership Council
Sue Mitchell
Sue Jarvis
John Barnes
Joan Barnes
Jay Mitchell
Sharon Hartman
Brad Rice
Rick Morris
Horticulture Advisory Committee
Wayne Flippen
Don Bennett
Ron Simmons
Jay Mitchell
Ray Tugel
Cheryl Ferguson
Livestock and Forages Advisory Committee
Austin Armstrong
Jessica Armstrong
Mark Bray
Marilynn Lankford
Ronnie Lankford
Darryl Lester
Tilda Lindsey
Jerry Mitchell
Clay Tuttle

VIII. Staff Membership

Carl Mitchell
Title: County Extension Director and Ext Agent, Agriculture - Livestock and Field Crops
Phone: (336) 593-8179
Email: ctmitch4@ncsu.edu

Marti Day
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Dairy
Phone: (919) 542-8202
Email: marti_day@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Responsible for educational programs for dairy farmers, youth with an interest in dairy projects and the general public with an interest in dairy foods and the dairy industry.

Taylor Furr
Title: Extension Agent, 4-H Youth Development
Phone: (336) 593-8179
Email: taylor_furr@ncsu.edu

Lauren Greene
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Poultry
Phone: (336) 651-7347
Email: lauren_greene@ncsu.edu

Tim Hambrick
Title: Area Agent, Agriculture
Phone: (336) 703-2857
Email: tim_hambrick@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Area Field Crop Agent for Forsyth, Stokes, and Surry, and Yadkin counties. Responsibilities include educational programming and research in flue cured tobacco, corn, small grain, and soybean production.

Bryan Hartman
Title: Extension Agent, Agriculture and Natural Resources
Phone: (336) 593-8179
Email: bkhartma@ncsu.edu

Marissa Herchler
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Animal Food Safety (FSMA Programs)
Phone: (919) 515-5396
Email: marissa_herchler@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Marissa is an Area Specialized Agent for animal food safety, with emphasis on the new Food Safety Modernization Act rules, as they apply to feed mills in North Carolina. Please contact Marissa with any FSMA related questions, or PCQI training inquiries.

Stacey Jones
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Commercial Nursery and Greenhouse
Phone: (704) 920-3310
Email: stacey_jones@ncsu.edu

Bill Lord
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Water Resources
Phone: (919) 496-3344
Email: william_lord@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Water quality education and technical assistance

Craig Mauney
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Commercial Vegetables and Fruits
Phone: (828) 684-3562
Email: craig_mauney@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provides educational opportunities, training and technical support to commercial fruit and vegetable growers, agents, and industry in Western NC.

Rachel McDowell
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Consumer and Retail Food Safety
Phone: (919) 515-9155
Email: romcdowe@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Support FCS Agents in delivering timely and evidence-based food safety education and information to stakeholders in NC.

Amy McKenzie
Title: County Extension Administrative Assistant
Phone: (336) 593-8179
Email: amy_mckenzie@ncsu.edu

Currey Nobles
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Food Safety
Phone: (919) 515-9520
Email: canobles@ncsu.edu

Elena Rogers
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Food Safety - Fresh Produce Western NC
Phone: (828) 352-2519
Email: elena_rogers@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provide educational programs, training and technical support focusing on fresh produce safety to Agents and growers in Western NC.

Patti Snyder
Title: Extension Agent, Family and Consumer Sciences
Phone: (336) 593-8179
Email: pebruce@ncsu.edu

Mitch Woodward
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Watersheds and Water Quality
Phone: (919) 250-1112
Email: mdwoodwa@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: NC Cooperative Extension's Goals include: - NC's natural resources and environmental quality will be protected, conserved and enhanced. - NC will have profitable, environmentally sustainable plant, animal and food systems. Protecting our environmental resources, particularly drinking water quality, is a top priority in NC. NC Cooperative Extension is a leader in teaching, researching, and accelerating the adoption of effective water quality protection practices.

IX. Contact Information

Stokes County Center
700 N Main St
Danbury, NC 27016

Phone: (336) 593-8179
Fax: (336) 593-8790
URL: http://stokes.ces.ncsu.edu