2018 Surry County Program Impact Report

Approved: January 21, 2019

I. Executive Summary

Surry County Cooperative Extension is an educational partnership between NC State University, NC A&T State University and Surry County. Our mission is to deliver education and technology that enriches the lives, land and economy of local citizens. Cooperative Extension meets people’s needs, supplies decision makers with unbiased data and helps individuals, families, farms and communities succeed. Cooperative Extension accomplishes this through one-on-one visits, training classes, telephone consultations, social media and website postings, newsletters, magazine and news articles, speaking engagements, demonstrations and other educational delivery methods.
Last year (2018), the Surry County Cooperative Extension Center had 36,127 Agricultural, 7,496 4-H and 13,404 Family and Consumer Science contacts for information. In addition, 425 educational opportunities were offered to Surry County residents. Volunteers contributed 6,027 hours of time to help expand Extension outreach at an estimated value of over $75,000.
Providing families with research-based nutrition information leads to better nutrition behaviors. The EFNEP program served 589 limited income people with nutrition information to improve their lives.
Farm income was increased by over $1,540,610 for livestock producers due to the adoption of Cooperative Extension recommended Best Management Practices for livestock production. Horticulture and Field Crop production saw an increase of $6,575,450 for a total of over $8,000,000.
Cooperative Extension partnered with Surry County Public Works and the NC Department of Agriculture to host a Household Hazardous Waste Collection Day. This annual event safely disposed of 2,115 pounds of unwanted pesticides at a value of $34,805.
$117,667.84 in outside fiscal resources were garnered for educational opportunities for county citizens.
Cooperative Extension provides the training for many certification programs. These range from safe pesticide handling to safe on-farm food production to restaurant food safety training. This year 35 farmers were trained in Good Agricultural Practices (GAP) and the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) to produce horticultural crops for human consumption. GAP training for tobacco producers is also delivered. 265 pesticide applicators were trained or recertified in safe handling and application of pesticides. 59 food handlers were trained in ServSafe for restaurants.
650 individuals utilized Cooperative Extension, who coordinated the SHIIP Medicare Part D program, to help select the correct prescription drug plan to save themselves money. In 2018, these individuals saved $990,769.
Throughout 2018 Surry County 4-H offered a variety of programs including school to career topics, plant and animal science, earth science, natural resource management, sewing, cooking, and STEM development activities. With a total of 42 programs offered, Surry County 4-H was able to reach 1,130 youth in programs last year.
In summary, with increases in income, cost savings and fiscal resources brought into the program of $9,218,187 Surry County Cooperative Extension returned a phenomenal $31.11 return per dollar invested by Surry County government to the citizens of the county.

II. County Background

Surry County is located in the North Central District with a population of approximately 74,000. The elderly population (65 years and over) is approximately 11,000. Latino populations in the county have increased approximately 600% over the last five years. The largest age segment of the population in Surry County is the 5-19 year old group, representing approximately 20% of the population. There is an increasing need to teach life and technical skills to the youth in the county, in order to prepare them for an employable future.

There is increasing concern for the health and well-being for Surry County citizens. Over 68% of the county population is considered overweight or obese. Heart disease, stroke, and cancer are the leading causes of death in the county. Approximately 30% of Surry's population has been diagnosed with diabetes.

Surry is primarily rural with a high agricultural income. In 2016 (latest available numbers) the agricultural income was in excess of $300 million. Agriculture is shifting from a traditional tobacco based system to other alternative agricultural enterprises. The average age of the farmer is increasing and fewer young farmers are emerging. Value-added agricultural enterprises are being evaluated. The local Farmers Markets are growing and are helping expand market potential for fresh locally grown produce to be marketed. Surry is very fortunate to have an abundance of natural resources and efforts such as easements and agricultural districting to protect these resources are increasing. Traditional agricultural enterprises are continuing as well.

Surry has four municipalities, Mount Airy, Elkin, Dobson, and Pilot Mountain. Job losses due to loss of textile manufacturing is driving the need for new economic development.

Environmental scans of all advisory groups and discussions with elected officials determined priority issues and the ranking of the issues. These scans were accomplished through group interaction, surveys, and individual conversations. The identified issues in order of importance are 1) Economic Development, 2) Aging, 3) Youth, 4) Natural Resources, and 5) Agricultural Awareness. Extension will address these issues through a multifaceted approach of educational programming to all relevant audiences.

III. Objectives to Address the Cooperative Extension Long Range Plan

North Carolina's plant production systems will become more profitable and sustainable.

Value* Outcome Description
137Number of crop (all plant systems) producers increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, and/or skills as related to: 1. Best management production practices (cultural, nutrient, and genetics) 2. Pest/insect, disease, weed, wildlife management 3. Financial/Farm management tools and practices (business, marketing, government policy, human resources) 4. Alternative agriculture, bioenergy, and value-added enterprises
5Number of Extension initiated and controlled County demonstration test sites (new required for GLF/PSI reporting)
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
75Number of crop (all plant systems) producers adopting best management practices, including those practices related to nutrient management, conservation, production, cultivars, pest management (weeds, diseases, insects), business management, and marketing
219000Net income gains realized by the adoption of best management practices, including those practices related to nutrient management, conservation, production, cultivars, pest management (weeds, diseases, insects), business management, and marketing
5Number of producers reporting increased dollar returns per acre or reduced costs per acre
1Number of producers reporting reduction in fertilizer used per acre
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

North Carolina's animal production systems will become more profitable and sustainable.

Value* Outcome Description
395Number of animal producers increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, and/or skills as related to: 1. Best management production practices (cultural, nutrient, and genetics) 2. Pest/insect, disease, weed, wildlife management 3. Financial/Farm management tools and practices (business, marketing, government policy, human resources) 4. Alternative agriculture, bioenergy, and value-added enterprises
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
211Number of animal producers adopting Extension-recommended best management practices, including those practices related to husbandry, improved planning, marketing, and financial practices
1540610Net income gains by producers adopting Extension-recommended best management practices, including those practices related to husbandry, improved planning, marketing, and financial practices
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Producers will increase sales of food locally to more agriculturally aware consumers through market development, producer and consumer education, and new farmer and infrastructure support.

Value* Outcome Description
75Number of producers who gain skills or knowledge to increase production for local markets.
75Number of adults (including producers, food business owners, etc.) who improved knowledge of local food and agricultural systems.
72Number of children/youth who improved knowledge of local food and agricultural systems.
137Number of individuals who gain knowledge or acquire skills related to vegetable/fruit gardening, and if also reporting under Urban and Consumer Agriculture Objective, divide up the reported number appropriately between the two objectives to avoid duplication.
20Number of producers who improve local food marketing skills or knowledge.
30Number of individuals who learn how to prepare local foods, including through use of home food preservation techniques.
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
1Number of new and existing access points for consumers that expand or improve their offering of local fruits and vegetables. Access points include farmers markets, retail stores, school food programs, community gardens, institutions other than schools (e.g. hospitals, universities, etc.), and other systems/access points not noted (e.g. restaurants, etc.).
50Number of producers selling their agricultural products to local markets (direct, intermediated/food service, institutional) for consumption in NC.
350000Gross sales of local foods by producers. (Increase in gross sales to be calculated at the state level.)
10Number of producers (and other members of the local food supply chain) who have increased revenue.
3Number of new farms (beginning farmers) selling into local markets for local consumption (in this reporting period).
16Number of individuals who grow food in community gardens.
142Number of youth who grow food in school gardens.
50Number of individuals who begin home food production by starting a vegetable and/or fruit garden, and if also reporting under Urban and Consumer Horticulture Objective, divide up the reported number appropriately between the two objectives to avoid duplication.
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Agricultural producers, workers, food handlers and consumers will adopt safer food and agricultural production, handling, and distribution practices that reduce workplace and home injuries/illnesses, enhance food security, and increase the quality and safety of food that North Carolinians prepare and consume.

Value* Outcome Description
156Number of food service employees receiving ServSafe certification
24Number of participants trained in safe home food handling, preservation, or preparation practices
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
156Number of participants implementing ServSafe
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Individuals and groups will acquire leadership and decision making capacities needed to guide and actively participate in local and state organizations.

Value* Outcome Description
12Number of adults increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
6Number of adults assuming new/expanded leadership roles in the community
34Number of youth increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
6Number of youth assuming new/expanded leadership roles in the community
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
10Number of adults increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
2Number of adults assuming new/expanded leadership roles in the community
34Number of youth increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
6Number of youth assuming new/expanded leadership roles in the community
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Youth and adults will address community issues and/or challenges through volunteerism.

Value* Outcome Description
49Number of adult participants acquiring the skills needed to serve as a volunteer
35Number of youth participants reporting aspirations to serve in new or expanded volunteer roles in community
23Number of adult participants reporting aspirations to serve in new or expanded volunteer roles in community
36Number of hours adult volunteer training conducted
52Number of hours youth volunteer training conducted
21Number new volunteers recruited
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
106Increased number of hours contributed by trained youth volunteers
11363Increased number of hours contributed by trained adult volunteers
4Number of youth volunteers serving in new or expanded roles within Extension
15Number of adult volunteers serving in new or expanded roles within Extension
1Number of youth volunteers serving in new or expanded roles beyond Extension, including community boards and task forces
4Number of adult volunteers serving in new or expanded roles beyond Extension, including community boards and task forces
2Number of youth volunteers recruiting and/or training new volunteers
11Number of adult volunteers recruiting and/or training new volunteers
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Adults and youth will apply financial management practices to increase their economic security, which include to: meet basic necessities, increase savings, reduce debt, and build long-term assets.

Value* Outcome Description
650Number of people gaining knowledge and/or skills to increase family economic security (such as; how to access: SNAP benefits, SHIIP Medicare Part D; food cost management, cost comparison skills, shop for reverse mortgages, select long term care insurance, etc.)
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
650Number people implementing risk management strategies (such as; seeking HUD or other housing counseling, accessing federal or state programs to address the issue, comparing among and selecting insurance coverage, financial preparation for disasters)
664Number of people accessing programs and implementing strategies to support family economic well-being
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Futures that Work: School to Career Pathways

Value* Outcome Description
2Number of teachers trained in 4-H STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) curriculum
308Number of youth (students) increasing knowledge in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math)
162Total number of female participants in STEM program
15Number of high school age youth (students) participating as members of 4-H clubs
289Number of youth (students) increasing knowledge of career/employability skills
249Number of youth (students) increasing knowledge of entrepreneurship
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
2Number of teachers using 4-H STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) curriculum in their classrooms
146Number of youth (students) gaining knowledge in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math)
193Number of youth (students) gaining career / employability skills
289Number of youth (students) gaining entrepreneurship skills
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Consumers and communities will enhance the value of plants, animals, and landscapes while conserving valuable natural resources and protecting the environment.

Value* Outcome Description
1357Number of participants improving knowledge, attitude, skills and aspirations regarding gardening and landscape practices including plant selection and placement, turfgrass management, soil management, growing food, water conservation and water quality preservation, storm water and erosion management, green waste management, pest and wildlife management
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
125Number of participants who use extension-recommended best management practices in landscapes, turf, and gardens, including pest (insect, weed, disease) management, fertility management, water conservation, water quality preservation and pruning techniques
78000Total cost savings from the use of extension-recommended best management practices in landscapes, turf, and gardens, including pest (insect, weed, disease) management, fertility management, water conservation, water quality preservation and pruning techniques
60Number of participants who use extension-recommended pest management practices in homes, public facilities, businesses or in community pest management programs
15000Cost savings from using extension-recommended pest management practices in homes, public facilities, businesses or in community pest management programs
105Number of participants selecting appropriate landscape plants (adapted, drought tolerant, appropriate size, etc.)
5500Cost savings from the appropriate selection of landscape plants
157Number of participants growing food for home consumption
2123550Value of produce grown for home consumption
55Number of participants adopting composting
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Youth and adult program participants will make healthy food choices, achieve the recommended amount of physical activity and reduce risk factors for chronic diseases.

Value* Impact Description
59Number of adults increasing their fruit and vegetables consumption
677Number of youth increasing their fruit and vegetable consumption
529Number of participants increasing their physical activity
25Number of participants who consume less sodium in their diet
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

IV. Number of Contacts Made by Extension

Type of ContactNumber
Face-to-face* 12,899
Non face-to-face** 43,998
Total by Extension staff in 2018 56,897
* Face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make directly with individuals through one-on-one visits, meetings, and other activities where staff members work directly with individuals.
** Non face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make indirectly with individuals by telephone, email, newsletters, news articles, radio, television, and other means.

V. Designated Grants Received by Extension

Type of GrantAmount
Contracts/Grants $69,419.00
Gifts/Donations $19,237.84
In-Kind Grants/Donations $18,170.00
United Way/Foundations $0.00
User Fees $10,841.00
Total $117,667.84

VI. Volunteer Involvement in Extension Programs

Number of Volunteers* Number of Volunteer Hours Known client contacts by volunteers Dollar Value at 24.69
4-H: 78 387 424 $ 9,555.00
Advisory Leadership System: 7 14 0 $ 346.00
Extension Community Association: 40 2,594 0 $ 64,046.00
Extension Master Gardener: 25 2,160 6,480 $ 53,330.00
Other: 128 872 1,340 $ 21,530.00
Total: 278 6027 8244 $ 148,807.00
* The number of volunteers reflects the overall number of volunteers for multiple events.

VII. Membership of Advisory Leadership System

Surry County Livestock and Forage Advisory Board
Wayne Allred
David Bledsoe
Kit Burcham
James Bledsoe
Matt Coe
Gilvin Guyer
Everett Johnson
Mark Johnson
Bobby Nichols
Frank Sprinkle

Surry County Extension Advisory Council
Cindy Marion
David Bledsoe
Joy Hemmings
Eddie Harris-BOCC
Sue Johnson
Mike Midkiff
Jamie Draughn
Flannery Heath
Patricia Stallard
Frank Sprinkle
Rick Thompson
Kelly Whittington
James Bledsoe
Greg Smith
Jessi Thomas
Bill Colvard
Van Cooke
Donna Collins
Paula Brinkley
Todd Tucker
Mike Jones
Family and Consumer Science Program Committee
Kelly Whittington
Celena Watson
Sarah Welch
Bradley Key
Seydel Cropps
Amanda Royall
Donna Collins

4-H and Youth Advisory Committee
Daniel White
Gail Shelton
Julie Davis
Madeline Jones
Joanna Radford
Extension and Community Association County Council
Susan Johnson
Joy Hemmings
Jean Hardy
Juanita Gillespie
Marilyn Geiger
Carole Simpson
Goldie Sparger
Lisa Royall
Ann Davis
Jean Hester-Kyttle

Horticulture/Alternative Agriculture Program Committee
Joy Barlow
Paul Madren
Michella Huff
Donna Marion
Van Cooke
Surry County Beekeepers
Davie Simpson
Eugene Brown
Paul Madren
Sharon Quesinberry

Master Gardener Board
Ken Holdaway
Sharon Poindexter
Janice Johnson
Linda Vaught
Joy Barlow

VIII. Staff Membership

Bryan Cave
Title: County Extension Director, Surry and Interim County Extension Director, Yadkin
Phone: (336) 401-8025
Email: bryan_cave@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Administration, Livestock, Forages

Brent Buchanan
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Dairy
Phone: (315) 212-1277
Email: babuchan@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Dairy Extension Programming in Western North Carolina Counties of Haywood, Madison, Buncombe, Transylvania, Henderson, Yancey, McDowell, Polk, Rutherford, Mitchell, Avery, Burke, Cleveland, Watauga, Caldwell, Catawba, Lincoln, Gaston, Ashe, Wilkes, Alexander, Iredell, Alleghany, Surry, Yadkin, and Davie.

Seydel Cropps
Title: EFNEP Educator, Extension Program Associate
Phone: (336) 401-8025
Email: seydel_cropps@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Work in EFNEP Nutrition Education Program with limited resource audiences

Lauren Greene
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Poultry
Phone: (336) 651-7347
Email: lauren_greene@ncsu.edu

Tim Hambrick
Title: Area Agent, Agriculture
Phone: (336) 703-2857
Email: tim_hambrick@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Area Field Crop Agent for Forsyth, Stokes, and Surry, and Yadkin counties. Responsibilities include educational programming and research in flue cured tobacco, corn, small grain, and soybean production.

Marissa Herchler
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Animal Food Safety (FSMA Programs)
Phone: (919) 515-5396
Email: marissa_herchler@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Marissa is an Area Specialized Agent for animal food safety, with emphasis on the new Food Safety Modernization Act rules, as they apply to feed mills in North Carolina. Please contact Marissa with any FSMA related questions, or PCQI training inquiries.

Stacey Jones
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Commercial Nursery and Greenhouse
Phone: (704) 920-3310
Email: stacey_jones@ncsu.edu

Carmen Long
Title: Area Agent, Family and Consumer Sciences
Phone: (336) 401-8025
Email: carmen_long@ncsu.edu

Bill Lord
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Water Resources
Phone: (919) 496-3344
Email: william_lord@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Water quality education and technical assistance

Craig Mauney
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Commercial Vegetables and Fruits
Phone: (828) 684-3562
Email: craig_mauney@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provides educational opportunities, training and technical support to commercial fruit and vegetable growers, agents, and industry in Western NC.

Rachel McDowell
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Consumer and Retail Food Safety
Phone: (919) 515-9155
Email: romcdowe@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Support FCS Agents in delivering timely and evidence-based food safety education and information to stakeholders in NC.

Currey Nobles
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Food Safety
Phone: (919) 515-9520
Email: canobles@ncsu.edu

Joanna Radford
Title: Extension Agent, Agriculture and Natural Resources
Phone: (336) 401-8025
Email: joanna_radford@ncsu.edu

Elena Rogers
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Food Safety - Fresh Produce Western NC
Phone: (828) 352-2519
Email: elena_rogers@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provide educational programs, training and technical support focusing on fresh produce safety to Agents and growers in Western NC.

Amanda Royall
Title: Program Assistant, EFNEP - Youth
Phone: (336) 401-8025
Email: amanda_royall@ncsu.edu

Sally Southard
Title: County Extension Administrative Assistant
Phone: (336) 401-8025
Email: sally_southard@ncsu.edu

Nicole Vernon
Title: County Extension Support Specialist
Phone: (336) 401-8025
Email: nicole_vernon@ncsu.edu

Mitch Woodward
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Watersheds and Water Quality
Phone: (919) 250-1112
Email: mdwoodwa@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: NC Cooperative Extension's Goals include: - NC's natural resources and environmental quality will be protected, conserved and enhanced. - NC will have profitable, environmentally sustainable plant, animal and food systems. Protecting our environmental resources, particularly drinking water quality, is a top priority in NC. NC Cooperative Extension is a leader in teaching, researching, and accelerating the adoption of effective water quality protection practices.

IX. Contact Information

Surry County Center
915 E Atkins St
Suite 300
Dobson, NC 27017

Phone: (336) 401-8025
Fax: (336) 401-8048
URL: http://surry.ces.ncsu.edu