2017 Transylvania County Program Impact Report

Approved: January 31, 2018

I. Executive Summary

The Transylvania Cooperative Extension Center operates under a Memorandum of Understanding with Transylvania County and has been providing educational and technical assistance to Transylvania County citizens since 1917, living up to its motto of:"Empowering People, Providing Solutions". Transylvania County Cooperative Extension develops programs in 4-H, Agriculture, home gardening, local foods, commercial and consumer horticulture and the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program. We collaborate with a many community organizations and add value to their programs.

In 2017, Transylvania County Cooperative Extension Staff responded to 18,428 citizens through our educational programs and other direct (face to face) communications. Another 48,244 citizens where contacted through telephone, email, newsletters and news articles to provide educational information and resources. Transylvania County Extension Staff provided hundreds of non degree credit training hours involving thousands Transylvania County Citizens. Transylvania County Cooperative Extension also has a tremendous volunteer network. Volunteers gave over 4000 hours of service to their communities working on advisory committees, Master Gardener, SHIIP and 4-H programs. This equates to an estimated dollar value for services rendered to Transylvania County Citizens of over $100,000 dollars. In addition, we brought more than $40,000 in private donations and matching funds from non profits.


Staffing: 2017 was the first year in many years that we did not see any significant changes in staff. The office remains in an excellent position to respond to the expressed needs of our community. However, there is a significant opportunity to collaborate with neighboring counties to increase the amount of programming from Family Consumer Science programs. In 2017, TCCES hosted an intern in the summer, which was funded through the Golden Leaf Foundation. This was a positive learning experience for both the intern and the TCCES staff.

SUCCESSES: In 2017 the Transylvania Cooperative Extension program provided significant positive contributions to county citizens, county and city governments and the local economy. Positive Extension impacts can be seen in our many “signature” programs such as 4-H and youth development, Extension Master Gardener Volunteers (EMGV), agricultural production, local food, farmland preservation, natural resource management, Expanded Foods and Nutrition Education (EFNEP) etc. Examples of these programs effectively in action can be seen in the success stories below.


4-H and Youth Development:
Nine clubs (132 members), 15 special interest programs (242 participants), and 4 school enrichment programs (309 participants) were managed with the support of 93 adult and 21 youth volunteers and community partners (TCS, PARI, TC Sheriff Dept., Pisgah Center for Wildlife Education, Connestee Fishing Club, Gwynn Valley Camp, The Science House, Cherryfield Farm).
Successes and big impacts:
• TIME for real science program partnership with TCS - high school students conducting research on local issues and earning awards at the district, state, national and international level.
• 4-H “Soil Solutions” science education- had 120 students and 6 teachers doing hands on education.
• Students doing real science with Forestry Researchers- 12 students experienced the entire scientific process including research and data collection.
• Little River Community Revitalization- 15 4-H Youth and their parents take on leadership roles in their community.
• Youth taking on leadership roles through Teen Council Club- 4-H teens identified community needs, acquired grant money, and addressed issues such as college readiness and teen homelessness. Teens are building relationships with other teen activists across NC at district and state 4-H events.

Livestock and Row Crops/ Natural Resources:
Almost 200 farm visits assisting producers with animal health and nutrition.
Successes and big impacts:
• Field day at Rosman High School- 29 students and adults were educated on caring for their livestock through better pasture management.
• Ag Resource Rodeo in Rosman- demonstrated the wide variety of equipment available for local growers to borrow.
• Implementation of Hemlock Cost share program- protected over 1200 trees in riparian areas
• Beef quality assurance training at Brevard High School- Acquired a grant and provided education for 30 students to become BQA certified.
• Western North Carolina Beef Conference- brought 65 producers from different counties for continuing education. Evaluation results showed an impact of $125,350.
• Upper French Broad Riverfest - aided in planning and implementing the second annual Upper French Broad Riverfest (a natural resource educational event).

Local Foods/ Sustainable plant systems:
Provided production and marketing consultation assistance to this counties gardeners and larger scale producers.
Successes and big impacts:
• 11 Master Gardener volunteers trained, over 2000 hours contributed from 75 volunteers
• Designed and delivered educational programming to meet new market demands for local medicinal herb with 15 programs to over 130 clients.
• Ag Advisory Board successfully adapted VAD ordinance to better support local farms
• Local farmers awarded $12,000 in ag options grants for new and innovative projects.
• Ag Program Assistant provided over 50 hours of local foods instruction to 379 youth and adults through 19 different learning activities.
EFNEP
Provided hands on nutrition and physical activity education to 559 Transylvania County students.
Successes and big impacts:
• Averaged 5.5 hours of instruction per group
• After receiving a series of at least 6 EFNEP lessons:
• 76% of students improved dietary intake
• 24% of students improved daily physical activity
• 56% of students improved food safety habits

Consumer and Commercial Horticulture:
Providing non-biased education to the horticultural industry in Transylvania County.
Successes and big impacts:
• 31 Continuing education credit classes offered for pesticide license holders
• Increased participation in classes by 18%
• 70 credit hours gained by local landscape contractors
• Value of credits obtained by Transylvania: $2,010,000
SHIIP:
Volunteer based program through the NC Dept of Insurance, providing non-biased information to people on Medicare for free.
• 899 contact opportunities recorded
• 396 face to face counseling sessions.
• 713 volunteer hours were recorded for the contacts made


II. County Background
COUNTY GEOGRAPHY:
Transylvania County is located in the southwestern part of North Carolina and has a total land area of 379.7 square miles or 242,988 acres. The elevation ranges from 1,265 feet where the Horsepasture River meets Lake Jocasse at the South Carolina State Line, to 6,043 feet near the Blue Ridge Parkway. The County is bordered by Buncombe County to the north, Henderson County to the east, Haywood and Jackson Counties to the west, and Pickens, Oconee and Greenville Counties in South Carolina to the south. The City of Brevard is located in the center of Transylvania County and is the county seat. The Town of Rosman is approximately ten miles southwest of Brevard.

Cooperative Extension Involvement in County Programming

THE 2016-2021 TRANSYLVANIA COUNTY ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STRATEGIC PLAN: The plan document lists six goals with a list of strategies accompanying each goal. (The plan can be found on the Transylvania County Planning Departments web site.)

THE TRANSYLVANIA COUNTY FARMLAND PROTECTION PLAN: The plan was adopted in 2010. This plan has eleven recommended actions. (The plan can be found on the Cooperative Extension website)

THE TRANSYLVANIA NATURAL RESOURCE COUNCIL: TCCES serves as staff to this county advisory committee, which reports to the Board of Commissioners. We take minutes, facilitate meetings and advise on presentations and natural resource concerns when appropriate. A full list of current members and the mission of the TNRC can be found on the county website.

Agricultural Advisory Board: TCCES serves as staff to this county advisory committee, which reports to the Board of Commissioners. We take minutes, facilitate meetings and advise when appropriate. In 2017 we relied heavily on Extension Specialists and other outside experts to assist with the creation of an updated county ordinance. A full list of current members and the mission of the Ag Advisory Board can be found on the county website.

ADVISORY LEADERSHIP SYSTEM:
Extension Advisory Leaders were utilized to discuss strategies, objectives and the capacity of the local staff to address issues as they related to Cooperative Extensions mission. As a result of these discussions and Extension Staff recommendations the following statewide objectives were selected for major program emphasis (Below).

II. County Background

North Carolina Cooperative Extension Service, Transylvania County Center works with an advisory leadership system to remain in touch with the most pressing needs of the county. Extension Advisory Leaders were utilized to discuss strategies, objectives and the capacity of the local staff to address issues as they related to Cooperative Extensions mission. In addition, Cooperative Extension conducts evaluations of all programs to constantly improve their effectiveness and make sure that we can document the level to which we are improving knowledge gain and affecting positive behavior change. As a result of these discussions and Extension Staff recommendations the following statewide objectives were selected for major program emphasis.

Through our environmental scanning we have devised the following priorities for our programs in 2017:
Local Foods-
Engage at least 200 customers per month with educational material at the Farmers Market
Log at least 2000 volunteer hours from our Master Gardeners
Incorporate at least 30 private land owners in the Hemlock Cost share program
Consult with staff and experts to update the County's ordinance on Voluntary Ag Districts
Enroll at least 20 more people in the Voluntary Ag District Program

Horticulture-
Provide adequate classes for Landscape Contractors to meet their CEU requirements to stay in business
Provide classes for the 100+ Pesticide Applicators to insure that they remain compliant with environmental law.
Support regional Master Gardener Program

EFNEP and Ag Program Assistant-
Provide Nutrition Education to 500+ Transylvania County students through EFNEP programming
Address Nutrition, Physical Activity and Weight Health Priority established by the Transylvania County Community Health Assessment (CHA)
Support the 4-H locavore program
Maintain Nourishing North Carolina Garden

Livestock-
Coordinate with local schools to provide Beef Quality Assurance training to all animal science students.
Provide educational programs for at least 100 beef producers at a district-wide conference.
Engage with at least 100 livestock producers in the county to promote best management practices.

4-H-
Provide high quality STEM (science, technology, engineering, math) programs for youths during and afterschool to promote critical thinking and prepare them for STEM careers
Help youths develop "Soft Skills" to enhance their future employability
Empower youths ages 9 - 18 to take on new or expanded leadership positions at the club, county, district and state levels of the 4-H program. Maintain Adult Volunteer Involvement - @100 adults - to offer quality youth programming beyond what the 4-H Agent can provide.
Partner with other agencies to provide youth programming

COUNTY GEOGRAPHY:
Transylvania County is located in the southwestern part of North Carolina and has a total land area of 379.7 square miles or 242,988 acres. The elevation ranges from 1,265 feet where the Horsepasture River meets Lake Jocasse at the South Carolina State Line, to 6,043 feet near the Blue Ridge Parkway. The County is bordered by Buncombe County to the north, Henderson County to the east, Haywood and Jackson Counties to the west, and Pickens, Oconee and Greenville Counties in South Carolina to the south. The City of Brevard is located in the center of Transylvania County and is the county seat. The Town of Rosman is approximately ten miles southwest of Brevard.

* THE 2016-2021 TRANSYLVANIA COUNTY ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STRATEGIC PLAN: The plan document lists six goals with a list of strategies accompanying each goal. (The plan can be found on the Transylvania County Planning Departments web site.) Cooperative Extension is in a unique position to support all six goals in this plan.

* THE TRANSYLVANIA COUNTY FARMLAND PROTECTION PLAN: The plan was adopted in 2010. This plan has eleven recommended actions. (The plan can be found on the Cooperative Extension website

COOPERATIVE EXTENSION STAFFING: Transylvania County Cooperative Extension worked closely with Transylvania County Administration to meet the goals of the State Strategic Plan, which was fully implemented in July of 2016. The most significant result of this strategic plan was county funding for the Extension program needed to increase by 32%. In addition, the Horticulture position was moved to 20% of Transylvania County time after accepting State funding to operate at a district level, and the EFNEP position was moved to 50% youth EFNEP and 50% Ag Program Assistant. Finally, we requested and did not receive a partnership with Henderson County FCS. However, this program took on state funding which enables it to operate at a district level, so we are able to benefit from FCS programming here in Transylvania County. These changes put the county office in the strongest possible position to respond to the stated needs of our clients. We look forward to moving ahead confident that the future of Extension is very bright in Transylvania County.

III. Objectives to Address the Cooperative Extension Long Range Plan

North Carolina's plant production systems will become more profitable and sustainable.

Value* Outcome Description
8Number of crop (all plant systems) producers increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, and/or skills as related to: 1. Best management production practices (cultural, nutrient, and genetics) 2. Pest/insect, disease, weed, wildlife management 3. Financial/Farm management tools and practices (business, marketing, government policy, human resources) 4. Alternative agriculture, bioenergy, and value-added enterprises
1Number of Extension initiated and controlled County demonstration test sites (new required for GLF/PSI reporting)
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
20Number of crop (all plant systems) producers adopting best management practices, including those practices related to nutrient management, conservation, production, cultivars, pest management (weeds, diseases, insects), business management, and marketing
40000Net income gains realized by the adoption of best management practices, including those practices related to nutrient management, conservation, production, cultivars, pest management (weeds, diseases, insects), business management, and marketing
15Number of producers reporting increased dollar returns per acre or reduced costs per acre
15Number of producers reporting reduction in fertilizer used per acre
600Number of acres in conservation tillage or other Best Management Practice
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

North Carolina's animal production systems will become more profitable and sustainable.

Value* Outcome Description
405Number of animal producers increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, and/or skills as related to: 1. Best management production practices (cultural, nutrient, and genetics) 2. Pest/insect, disease, weed, wildlife management 3. Financial/Farm management tools and practices (business, marketing, government policy, human resources) 4. Alternative agriculture, bioenergy, and value-added enterprises
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
115Number of animal producers adopting Extension-recommended best management practices, including those practices related to husbandry, improved planning, marketing, and financial practices
152350Net income gains by producers adopting Extension-recommended best management practices, including those practices related to husbandry, improved planning, marketing, and financial practices
20Number of animal producers implementing Extension-recommended best management practices for animal waste management
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Producers will increase sales of food locally to more agriculturally aware consumers through market development, producer and consumer education, and new farmer and infrastructure support.

Value* Outcome Description
15Number of producers who gain skills or knowledge to increase production for local markets.
426Number of adults (including producers, food business owners, etc.) who improved knowledge of local food and agricultural systems.
496Number of children/youth who improved knowledge of local food and agricultural systems.
338Number of individuals who gain knowledge or acquire skills related to vegetable/fruit gardening, and if also reporting under Urban and Consumer Agriculture Objective, divide up the reported number appropriately between the two objectives to avoid duplication.
15Number of producers who improve local food marketing skills or knowledge.
154Number of individuals who learn how to prepare local foods, including through use of home food preservation techniques.
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
7Number of new and existing access points for consumers that expand or improve their offering of local fruits and vegetables. Access points include farmers markets, retail stores, school food programs, community gardens, institutions other than schools (e.g. hospitals, universities, etc.), and other systems/access points not noted (e.g. restaurants, etc.).
65Number of producers selling their agricultural products to local markets (direct, intermediated/food service, institutional) for consumption in NC.
65Number of producers who diversified their marketing strategies into local markets (direct, intermediated/food service, institutional).
25750Gross sales of local foods by producers. (Increase in gross sales to be calculated at the state level.)
15Number of producers (and other members of the local food supply chain) who have increased revenue.
4Number of new farms (beginning farmers) selling into local markets for local consumption (in this reporting period).
3Number of new local food value chain businesses, other than farms (in this reporting period).
30Number of individuals who grow food in community gardens.
42000Number of pounds of local foods donated for consumption by vulnerable populations.
500Number of youth who grow food in school gardens.
67Number of individuals who begin home food production by starting a vegetable and/or fruit garden, and if also reporting under Urban and Consumer Horticulture Objective, divide up the reported number appropriately between the two objectives to avoid duplication.
4Number of individuals who begin home food production by starting to raise backyard livestock.
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Individuals and groups will acquire leadership and decision making capacities needed to guide and actively participate in local and state organizations.

Value* Outcome Description
40Number of adults increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
42Number of adults assuming new/expanded leadership roles in the community
46Number of youth increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
46Number of youth assuming new/expanded leadership roles in the community
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
42Number of adults increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
42Number of adults assuming new/expanded leadership roles in the community
46Number of youth increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
46Number of youth assuming new/expanded leadership roles in the community
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Youth and adults will address community issues and/or challenges through volunteerism.

Community members, organizations and local government will engage in collaborative dialog and decision-making to build economically, socially and environmentally resilient communities. This will be done through inclusive engagement, partnership building, and/or community planning.

Adults and youth will apply financial management practices to increase their economic security, which include to: meet basic necessities, increase savings, reduce debt, and build long-term assets.

Futures that Work: School to Career Pathways

Value* Outcome Description
9Number of teachers trained in 4-H STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) curriculum
405Number of youth (students) increasing knowledge in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math)
221Total number of female participants in STEM program
15Number of high school age youth (students) participating as members of 4-H clubs
81Number of youth (students) increasing knowledge of career/employability skills
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
9Number of teachers using 4-H STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) curriculum in their classrooms
405Number of youth (students) gaining knowledge in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math)
81Number of youth (students) gaining career / employability skills
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

North Carolinians will make decisions and adopt practices that implement effective resource protection and conservation.

Consumers and communities will enhance the value of plants, animals, and landscapes while conserving valuable natural resources and protecting the environment.

Value* Outcome Description
212Number of participants improving knowledge, attitude, skills and aspirations regarding gardening and landscape practices including plant selection and placement, turfgrass management, soil management, growing food, water conservation and water quality preservation, storm water and erosion management, green waste management, pest and wildlife management
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
60Number of participants who use extension-recommended best management practices in landscapes, turf, and gardens, including pest (insect, weed, disease) management, fertility management, water conservation, water quality preservation and pruning techniques
112500Total cost savings from the use of extension-recommended best management practices in landscapes, turf, and gardens, including pest (insect, weed, disease) management, fertility management, water conservation, water quality preservation and pruning techniques
18Number of participants who use extension-recommended pest management practices in homes, public facilities, businesses or in community pest management programs
31707500Cost savings from using extension-recommended pest management practices in homes, public facilities, businesses or in community pest management programs
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Youth and adult program participants will make healthy food choices, achieve the recommended amount of physical activity and reduce risk factors for chronic diseases.

Value* Impact Description
119Number of youth increasing their fruit and vegetable consumption
81Number of participants increasing their physical activity
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

IV. Number of Contacts Made by Extension

Type of ContactNumber
Face-to-face* 18,429
Non face-to-face** 29,816
Total by Extension staff in 2017 48,245
* Face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make directly with individuals through one-on-one visits, meetings, and other activities where staff members work directly with individuals.
** Non face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make indirectly with individuals by telephone, email, newsletters, news articles, radio, television, and other means.

V. Designated Grants Received by Extension

Type of GrantAmount
Contracts/Grants $0.00
Gifts/Donations $8,713.50
In-Kind Grants/Donations $31,300.00
United Way/Foundations $0.00
User Fees $0.00
Total $40,013.50

VI. Volunteer Involvement in Extension Programs

Number of Volunteers* Number of Volunteer Hours Known client contacts by volunteers Dollar Value at 24.69
4-H: 346 1,843 1,170 $ 45,504.00
Advisory Leadership System: 24 34 110 $ 839.00
Extension Community Association: 14 57 108 $ 1,407.00
Extension Master Gardener: 937 2,136 3,515 $ 52,738.00
Other: 99 219 1,816 $ 5,407.00
Total: 1420 4289 6719 $ 105,895.00
* The number of volunteers reflects the overall number of volunteers for multiple events.

VII. Membership of Advisory Leadership System

Green Industry Advisory Committee
Ken Allison
David Bradley
Alan Johnson
Anthony LeBude
Joey Galloway
Lynn Goldsmith
Hope Janowitz
Chad Owenby
Lynn Goldsmith
4-H and Youth Development
Jim Boyer
Margaret Brown
Christine Kosiba
Casey Lance
Linda Locks
David Mackey
Donovan Merrell
Kae Parker
Andrew Shook
David Smith
Ren Uriarte
Keri Zink

Livestock/Agriculture
David Mackey
Joffrey Merrill
John Blythe
Beecher Allison
Glen Sentelle
Anthony Hall
Clarence Raines
Frank Summey
Farmland Preservation/AAB
Brittany Whitmire
John Blythe
Leslie Logemann
Maryann Duvall
Leroy Newell
John Witherspoon
Jeff Parker
Emily Pohlman
Jimmy Whitmire
Natural Resources
Peter Chaveas
Mark Tooley
Justin Pettit-Mee
Lee McMinn
Woody Noland
Dan Hodges
Jeff Parker
Steve Pagano
David Whitmire
Jason Guidry
Jennifer Kafsky
Mac Marrow
Davis Whitfield-Cargile
Kent Wilcox
Dave Casey
Extension Program Development Council (County Advisory Council)
Jason Davis
Dale Robertson
Page Lemel
Susan Brown
Clair Marie Hannon
Dick Bir
Allen Frost
Carol Parker
Curtis Burnside
Jennifer Williams
John Witherspoon
Richard Fry
Shelly Webb

VIII. Staff Membership

Bart Renner
Title: County Extension Director & Extension Agent, Agriculture
Phone: (828) 884-3109
Email: bart_renner@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Small Farms & Local Food Programs

Mary Arnaudin
Title: Extension Agent, 4-H Youth Development
Phone: (828) 884-3109
Email: mary_arnaudin@ncsu.edu

Addison Bradley
Title: Extension Agent, Agriculture - Livestock, Field Crops
Phone: (828) 884-3109
Email: acbradl2@ncsu.edu

Brent Buchanan
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Dairy
Phone: (315) 212-1277
Email: brent_buchanan@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Dairy Extension Programming in Western North Carolina Counties of Haywood, Madison, Buncombe, Transylvania, Henderson, Yancey, McDowell, Polk, Rutherford, Mitchell, Avery, Burke, Cleveland, Watauga, Caldwell, Catawba, Lincoln, Gaston, Ashe, Wilkes, Alexander, Iredell, Alleghany, Surry, Yadkin, and Davie.

Burrows
Phone:
Email: bebbers838@gmail.com

Sara Freeman
Title: EFNEP Educator, Agriculture Program Assistant
Phone: (828) 884-3109
Email: sara_freeman@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provides Expanded Food and Nutrition Programs to limited resource families in Transylvania County. Provides and supports Agriculture programs in Transylvania County.

Lauren Greene
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Poultry
Phone: (336) 651-7347
Email: lauren_greene@ncsu.edu

Marissa Herchler
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Animal Food Safety (FSMA Programs)
Phone: (919) 515-5396
Email: marissa_herchler@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Marissa is an Area Specialized Agent for animal food safety, with emphasis on the new Food Safety Modernization Act rules, as they apply to feed mills in North Carolina. Please contact Marissa with any FSMA related questions, or PCQI training inquiries.

Bill Lord
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Water Resources
Phone: (919) 496-3344
Email: william_lord@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Water quality education and technical assistance

Craig Mauney
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Commercial Vegetables & Fruits
Phone: (828) 684-3562
Email: craig_mauney@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provides educational opportunities, training and technical support to commercial fruit and vegetable growers, agents, and industry in Western NC.

Maryann Mickewicz
Title: County Extension Administrative Assistant
Phone: (828) 884-3109
Email: maryann_mickewicz@ncsu.edu

Currey Nobles
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Food Safety
Phone: (919) 515-9520
Email: canobles@ncsu.edu

Elena Rogers
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Food Safety - Fresh Produce Western NC
Phone: (828) 352-2519
Email: elena_rogers@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provide educational programs, training and technical support focusing on fresh produce safety to Agents and growers in Western NC.

Cliff Ruth
Title: Area Agent and Regional Certification Program Coordinator, Agriculture
Phone: (828) 255-5522
Email: cliff_ruth@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Current Responsibilities: Provide educational programs primarily for the folk in the commercial green industries in WNC as well as pesticide education for farmers in Buncombe and Transylvania County. Coordinate certification and licensing workshops across the western third of the state.

Debbie Stroud
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Consumer & Retail Food Safety
Phone: (919) 515-9149
Email: dlstroud@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Area Specialized Agents in Consumer and Retail Food Safety help to ensure that Family and Consumer Sciences (FCS) Agents have access to timely, evidence-based food safety information. This is accomplished by (1) working with FCS Agents in their counties, (2) developing food safety materials and (3) planning and implementing a NC Safe Plates Food Safety Info Center.

Amanda Taylor
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Nursery and Greenhouse, Western Region
Phone: (828) 475-2915
Email: amanda_jo_taylor@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provides programming to commercial nursery and greenhouse producers in Alexander, Alleghany, Ashe, Avery, Buncombe, Burke, Caldwell, Catawba, Cherokee, Clay, Cleveland, Gaston, Graham, Haywood, Henderson, Jackson, Lincoln, Macon, Madison, McDowell, Mitchell, Polk, Rutherford, Swain, Transylvania, Watauga, Wilkes, and Yancey Counties.

Skip Thompson
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Aquaculture
Phone: (828) 456-3575
Email: Skip_Thompson@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provide educational opportunities and technical support to the trout and carp aquaculture industries in 38 counties and the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians (EBCI) in western North Carolina. Fish health, production management, and waste management educational programs will assist trout farmers, fee-fishing pond managers, carp ponds and trout fingerling producers with the management and sustainability of their facilities.

Mitch Woodward
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Watersheds and Water Quality
Phone: (919) 250-1112
Email: mdwoodwa@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: NC Cooperative Extension's Goals include: - NC's natural resources and environmental quality will be protected, conserved and enhanced. - NC will have profitable, environmentally sustainable plant, animal and food systems. Protecting our environmental resources, particularly drinking water quality, is a top priority in NC. NC Cooperative Extension is a leader in teaching, researching, and accelerating the adoption of effective water quality protection practices.

IX. Contact Information

Transylvania County Center
106 East Morgan Street
Suite 109
Brevard, NC 28712

Phone: (828) 884-3109
Fax: (828) 884-3142
URL: http://transylvania.ces.ncsu.edu