2017 Wake County Program Impact Report

Approved: January 26, 2018

I. Executive Summary

North Carolina State University's Extension program in Wake County represents a partnership between Wake County government, the land grant universities in the State and the community, including the customers we serve, the Advisory Leadership System within the County and our valued volunteers. Together we are working to align resources with substantiated needs and priorities, the strategic initiatives of both systems and the goals established by the Wake county Board of County Commissioners. In 2017, the Extension Center in Wake deployed 31.75 fte's and $2,610,271 (County and Development Budgets) in support of efforts to enhance the lives, land and economy in Wake County.

Extension professionals in Wake County provided shared leadership to the evolving Social and Economic Vitality goal established by the Board of County Commissioners; the Youth Thrive collective impact initiative for young people and the development of a Comprehensive Food Security Plan for the County using a Food Systems approach, in conjunction with the Capital Area Food Network. Additional community leadership included work with the establishment of an initiative targeting Adverse Childhood Experiences with Advocates for Health in Action, the Watershed Education Network, Wake County Smart Start, the Wake County Agribusiness Council and Wake County Farm Bureau Board. Extension within the County has extensive partnerships with United Way of the Greater Triangle, the Wake County Public School System, the SE Raleigh Promise, the City of Raleigh and the Raleigh Police Department,the Hope Center at Pullen Memorial, the Boys & Girls Clubs, the YMCA, Wade Edwards Learning Lab, Habitat for Humanity, the Healing Place, Neighbor2Neighbor, the Poe Center for Health Education, Passage Home, the NESI Foundation at Parrish Manor, Partners Against Trafficking Humans, the Salvation Army, Interfaith Food Shuttle, Alliance Medical Ministries and the Triangle Land Conservancy.

Internally within County Government, integrated programming efforts are in place with the WCHS Communicable Disease and Health Promotion Programs, LINKS and Relative Caregivers within Child Welfare; the Water Quality Division, Food Inspectors and Integrated Pest Management planning within Environmental Services and Wake's Soil & Water Conservation Department. These service integration efforts represent significant strategies jointly developed and often jointly delivered with other County employees. They help to build a case for effective and efficient use of shared resources and reflect shared decision-making about the deployment of resources where Extension shares accountability for efforts with other County departments.

In calendar year 2017, Extension staff reported face to face contacts 63,249 residents involving 10,604 participants in 328 distinct educational groups. Program highlights and results include:

~Completion and presentation of the Comprehensive Food Security Plan, the development of Breakfast in the Classroom pilots within WCPSS, expanded strategies for the 25 schools providing free universal breakfast, supporting the expansion of the summer food service program, continuation of the Growing our Food Security Leader efforts with middle schools, expanded efforts with the School Garden Network and the development of 10 new school-based food pantries.

~Development of a funded program with the Corporation for National & Community Service deploying 4 fulltime VISTA volunteers in support of Food Security efforts within 4-H to support Summer Food Service Expansion; with our Social & Economic Vitality Program Manager in Extension to integrate food security initiatives within our vulnerable community pilots; the Program Manager in the Long Term Planning Department to support data management & GIS needs; and with the Interfaith Food Shuttle to support the Capital Area Food Network. Wake County is providing the $12,000 match required for the initiation of the program as well as travel and training dollars for these talented volunteers.

~In 2017, Extension in partnership with Wake County, the City of Raleigh, the NC Small Business Development Group and United Way of the Greater Triangle launched the SE Raleigh Edition of the Innovation Challenge; an effort to identify, develop and fund entrepreneurs and leaders from within the SE Raleigh community to implement meaningful solutions to issues within their communities. $150,000 was raised and invested in the more than fifty participants from SE Raleigh who pitched ideas, 24 who participated in an extensive 6 week acceleration program and the 7 individuals and organizations who received more than $120,000 in investments to put their business plans or social ideas into action.

~4-H staff continue working with East Garner Middle and Garner High schools to provide the Together for a Better Education Program targeted to Latino students who are at considerable risk of dropping out of school. The program has served 124 middle and high school youth, 97 of whom feel they belong in school, hope to graduate and pursue post-secondary education; 92 who have participated in community service during the past year. Ninety-six participants have had parents to attend family educational events and over half have improved school attendance and grades.

~Agriculture staff worked to establish two on-farm soybean trials and held two field days with 73 area growers and agents to share results; contributed to the County's Integrated Pest Management Program and are continuing to build strong relationships with growers, producers and agribusiness partnerships in the community.

~Master Gardeners continued their partnered effort and offered the Seed to Supper program for 25 low income individuals wanting to learn to grow nutritious food at home; trained 100 homeowners from Habitat for Humanity in landscaping and lawn maintenance and offered a newly developed and award-winning Ready Garden Grow curriculum and classes at 4 Regional Libraries across the county. Master Gardener volunteers also did amazing horticulture therapy work with many senior centers and worked to install the Healing Transitions Garden for women in residential substance abuse treatment programs.

~Extension in Wake led "Backyard Stream Repair and Urban Rain-Scaping Programs, making a total of 25 visits involving over 110 participants from Apex, Raleigh and Cary. Three stream repair projects were completed stabilizing over 220 feet of stream-bank, reducing soil loss by over 25 tons annually, and together, the partners qualified for $25,000 in NC - Division of Soil and Water-community Conservation Assistance Cost-Share funding. Additional water quality projects including the "Green Neighborhoods program" in Cary, the NCSU River Course and additional rainwater harvesting resulted in 88% reduction in storm water runoff to local streams by using advanced irrigation system controllers that allowed controlled storm water release following storms.

~In 2017, 934 volunteers from Wake County contributed more than 32,598 hours of service at a dollar value estimated at $786,916.

Wake is anticipating a growing demand for urban agriculture programs, broader campus-based partnerships including a need to leverage expertise from our land-grant system to collect, analyze, manage and use "big data" to support more informed public policy. In addition, we are looking to reconstruct support staff systems to have a stronger impact through social media, media outreach and an enhanced web presence.

II. County Background

In December 2016, Wake County, the Capital seat of North Carolina, was home to more than 1.120,000 million people. It is the 2nd fastest growing county in the nation with a population over 1 million. Wake continues to be named among the top counties in the country to live, work, play and raise children. The county sees 64 new residents each day and continues to lose 13,000 acres of open space each year to other uses. Forty-eight percent of Wake's population has achieved a bachelor's or higher post secondary degree compared to 27% statewide. The median age has risen to 35; unemployment has fallen to 4.7% and the median income is now $66,634. Additionally, the County has been named 2nd healthiest county in the state the last two years after being recognized for four years in row as the State's Healthiest County. Of note, a little more than 10% of the state's total population and 10% of the state's population under 25 live in Wake County. While the percentage of Wake's population living below the poverty rate is smaller than many counties at 11%; that number represents approximately 123,200 people, a population larger than the total population of 78 counties in North Carolina.

North Carolina State University's Extension program in Wake County represents a partnership between Wake County Government, the land grant universities in the State and the community including the customers we serve, the Advisory Leadership System within the County and our valued volunteers. Together we are working to align resources with substantiated needs, the strategic initiatives of both systems and the goals established by the Wake County Board of Commissioners. In 2015, the Extension Center in Wake County deployed 32 staff and $1,823,852 in support of efforts to build human capital among individuals, contribute to the health of the community and vitality of our local economy. Core programs include Food, Agriculture and Youth Development.

Extension professionals in Wake County contribute substantially to the communities infrastructure to support collective impact. Extension provides shared leadership to the Human Capital Development initiative, the Youth Thrive collective impact initiative for young people and for the development of the Capital Area Food Network. They also contribute through their support of Advocates for Health in Action, the Watershed Education Network, Wake County Smart Start, the Raleigh College & Community Collaborative, the County's Emergency Animal Plan, the Healthiest Capital County campaign, the INFORM data system within Wake County Human Services, the Community Health Leadership Team as well as supporting the development of the Board of Commissioners goals and priorities. Extension has significant partnerships more than 70 organizations and all 11 municipalities and strong integrated program efforts are in place with the WCHS Communicable Disease and Health Promotion Programs, the Tween Clinic and WIC within Public Health; LINKS and Relative Caregivers within Child Welfare; the Water Quality division and Food Inspectors within Wake County Environmental Services.

In 2015, the Wake Extension Center collaborated to initiate several new programs. Farm to Child Care is a collaborative effort between Extension, Smart Start and AHA to increase access to fresh, local foods among our youngest residents attending one of the 600+ child care centers in our community. Extension worked in partnership with Carolina Farm Stewardship Association to develop a new leadership development initiative targeting emerging leaders in the local foods arena. We helped to establish the Wake County Food Security Workgroup where staff and interns from Extension completed a 2015 Report and Recommendations for comprehensive planning across sectors. Through Youth Thrive, Extension helped to bring conversations regarding collective impact to the forefront of the dialogue in our community. Youth Thrive produced the Youth Well Being Profile in February, 2015; joined the Healthiest Capital County effort in May and is scheduled to release the Blueprint Outlining Opportunities for Progress in March, 2016. This Blueprint will be followed by a Call to Action in May, 2016. In addition, the 4-H program expanded their efforts during the summer of 2015 to deliver more opportunities for positive youth development, additional scholarships for youth to attend residential 4-H camping programs and worked with a number of partners in the community to help expand the Summer Food Service Program and initiate a new two-generational program targeting foster youth, called Fostering Families.

Wake County 4-H Youth Development provided significant educational opportunities and supports to 3,431 youth. Ninety percent of these youth participated in staff facilitated life skills education groups or camps and ten percent were involved in volunteer led clubs. In order to reach limited resource families and priority populations identified by the child welfare, juvenile justice, and public health systems these services were delivered at 68 locations across the county. An additional 9,589 youth were reached through community outreach and school enrichment activities in cooperation with NCSU faculty and staff. 4-H also reached 2,345 adults through a variety of educational programs designed to increase self-sufficiency and promote adoption of best practices in positive youth development among family caregivers and community organizations. As a result of these efforts, 3,049 youth and adults demonstrated effective use of life skills (such as goal setting, stress management and adoption of health behaviors), and 2,408 individuals increased their knowledge of community resources they could access to sustain success in the future.

Volunteers continue to be a vital part of our educational delivery system in Extension. A new general orientation for all Extension volunteers is now in place improving the experience for potential volunteers and creating additional ambassadors for Extension. The County has 160 trained Master Gardener Volunteers, 102 members of Extension in the Community Association and more than 700 adults who volunteered last year through 4-H.

In 2016, the Wake Extension Center will continue to sustain and expand the effectiveness of these partnerships and educational services to consumers, youth & families, professionals and colleagues. Extension staff will continue to provide crucial infrastructure for collective impact initiatives in the community addressing Social & Economic Vitality of Vulnerable Communities, Youth Development, Food Security, Food Policy and Water Quality. By the end of the fiscal year, Youth Thrive will issue a call to action which will include an opportunity for partners to contribute towards a shared measurement system with state of the art analytics developed by SAS. We will have an operational infrastructure for Healthiest Capital County that aligns collaborative efforts from Cradle to Career and beyond that helps develop people, optimize health and support economic vitality. Extension in Wake has a strong urban horticulture component, provides the largest contribution in the state through the Ask an Expert initiative and has piloted new educational options for pesticide education and new initiatives with diverse partners. In 2016, we are working with a four county area to host a Farm School and look forward to attracting and retaining a new Agriculture Agent on board, who will provide direct, on farm and group education to farmers and producers addressing changes required by the Farm Safety Modernization Act as well as sustainable farming, expansion of new markets and farm income. This work is essential to the preservation of farmland and open space.

III. Objectives to Address the Cooperative Extension Long Range Plan

North Carolina's plant production systems will become more profitable and sustainable.

Value* Outcome Description
2861Number of crop (all plant systems) producers increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, and/or skills as related to: 1. Best management production practices (cultural, nutrient, and genetics) 2. Pest/insect, disease, weed, wildlife management 3. Financial/Farm management tools and practices (business, marketing, government policy, human resources) 4. Alternative agriculture, bioenergy, and value-added enterprises
6Number of Extension initiated and controlled County demonstration test sites (new required for GLF/PSI reporting)
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
100Number of crop (all plant systems) producers adopting best management practices, including those practices related to nutrient management, conservation, production, cultivars, pest management (weeds, diseases, insects), business management, and marketing
116900Net income gains realized by the adoption of best management practices, including those practices related to nutrient management, conservation, production, cultivars, pest management (weeds, diseases, insects), business management, and marketing
5590Number of acres in conservation tillage or other Best Management Practice
75Number of producers who adopted a dedicated bioenergy crop
5523Number of acres planted to a dedicated bioenergy crop
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

North Carolina's animal production systems will become more profitable and sustainable.

Value* Outcome Description
2220Number of animal producers increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, and/or skills as related to: 1. Best management production practices (cultural, nutrient, and genetics) 2. Pest/insect, disease, weed, wildlife management 3. Financial/Farm management tools and practices (business, marketing, government policy, human resources) 4. Alternative agriculture, bioenergy, and value-added enterprises
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
295Number of animal producers adopting Extension-recommended best management practices, including those practices related to husbandry, improved planning, marketing, and financial practices
4130Net income gains by producers adopting Extension-recommended best management practices, including those practices related to husbandry, improved planning, marketing, and financial practices
230Number of animal producers implementing Extension-recommended best management practices for animal waste management
5650Tons of livestock organic by-products utilized (nutrients from waste, compost, etc)
194050Net income gain by using livestock organic by-products instead of synthetic fertilizers
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Producers will increase sales of food locally to more agriculturally aware consumers through market development, producer and consumer education, and new farmer and infrastructure support.

Value* Outcome Description
36Number of producers who gain skills or knowledge to increase production for local markets.
713Number of adults (including producers, food business owners, etc.) who improved knowledge of local food and agricultural systems.
438Number of individuals who gain knowledge or acquire skills related to vegetable/fruit gardening, and if also reporting under Urban and Consumer Agriculture Objective, divide up the reported number appropriately between the two objectives to avoid duplication.
161Number of individuals who learn how to prepare local foods, including through use of home food preservation techniques.
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
32Number of new and existing access points for consumers that expand or improve their offering of local fruits and vegetables. Access points include farmers markets, retail stores, school food programs, community gardens, institutions other than schools (e.g. hospitals, universities, etc.), and other systems/access points not noted (e.g. restaurants, etc.).
6Number of new farms (beginning farmers) selling into local markets for local consumption (in this reporting period).
28Number of youth who grow food in school gardens.
90Number of individuals who begin home food production by starting a vegetable and/or fruit garden, and if also reporting under Urban and Consumer Horticulture Objective, divide up the reported number appropriately between the two objectives to avoid duplication.
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Agricultural producers, workers, food handlers and consumers will adopt safer food and agricultural production, handling, and distribution practices that reduce workplace and home injuries/illnesses, enhance food security, and increase the quality and safety of food that North Carolinians prepare and consume.

Value* Outcome Description
28Number of pesticide application credit hours provided
11Number of participants participating in AgriSafe personal protective equipment (PPE) selection or fit testing
9Number of food service employees receiving ServSafe certification
9TOTAL number of food handlers receiving food safety training and education in safe food handling practices (new required data for federal reporting)
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
28Number of participants that have adopted farm safety practices
2Number of persons certified in Good Agricultural Practices (GAPs) or Good Handling Practices (GHPs)
35Number of participants developing food safety plans
9Number of participants implementing ServSafe
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Individuals and groups will acquire leadership and decision making capacities needed to guide and actively participate in local and state organizations.

Value* Outcome Description
456Number of adults increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
158Number of adults assuming new/expanded leadership roles in the community
968Number of youth increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
120Number of youth assuming new/expanded leadership roles in the community
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
275Number of adults increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
226Number of adults assuming new/expanded leadership roles in the community
872Number of youth increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
271Number of youth assuming new/expanded leadership roles in the community
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Youth and adults will address community issues and/or challenges through volunteerism.

Value* Outcome Description
381Number of adult participants acquiring the skills needed to serve as a volunteer
96Number of youth participants reporting aspirations to serve in new or expanded volunteer roles in community
110Number of adult participants reporting aspirations to serve in new or expanded volunteer roles in community
375Number of hours adult volunteer training conducted
39Number of hours youth volunteer training conducted
118Number new volunteers recruited
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
135Increased number of hours contributed by trained youth volunteers
3964Increased number of hours contributed by trained adult volunteers
21Number of youth volunteers serving in new or expanded roles within Extension
34Number of adult volunteers serving in new or expanded roles within Extension
9Number of youth volunteers serving in new or expanded roles beyond Extension, including community boards and task forces
15Number of adult volunteers serving in new or expanded roles beyond Extension, including community boards and task forces
3Number of youth volunteers recruiting and/or training new volunteers
70Number of adult volunteers recruiting and/or training new volunteers
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Community members, organizations and local government will engage in collaborative dialog and decision-making to build economically, socially and environmentally resilient communities. This will be done through inclusive engagement, partnership building, and/or community planning.

Value* Outcome Description
514Number of participants increasing knowledge and skills in convening and leading inclusive, representative groups (including limited resources, new resident, or immigrant groups) for evidence based community development
452Number of participants developing skills in leading community, economic, and/or disaster planning and change
441Number of residents that increase their knowledge in disaster preparedness planning, mitigation and recovery
75Number of participants who increased their awareness, knowledge or skill in business related topics (e.g., management, product development, marketing, business structure options, business law and/or liability)
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
10Number of businesses created, retained, or expanded due to Extension’s community and economic development programming
1Number of local food councils in which Extension is involved
433Number of participants who adopted disaster preparedness and mitigation practices
31Number of participants who report new or expanded leadership roles and opportunities undertaken
457288Dollar value of in-kind resources (funding, in-kind service or volunteers) contributed to Projects or Programs in which Extension was critically involved by an organization or community to support community or economic development work
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Parents and caregivers will effectively use recommended parenting, self care practices and community resources.

Value* Outcome Description
2438Number of youth and adults increasing knowledge of life skills (such as goal setting, stress management, self-care and healthy relationships)
518Number of adults increasing their knowledge of community resources
212Number of adults and professionals increasing their knowledge of human development over the life course and emerging best practices in parenting and caregiving
140Number of parents and other caregivers of children increasing their knowledge of positive parenting practices (such as communication and discipline)
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
1356Number of youth and adults using effective life skills (such as goal setting, stress management, self-care and healthy relationships)
222Number of adults increasing their use of identified community resources
47Number of professionals using learned best practices with children/youth/adults/older adults
107Number of parents/other caregivers of children adopting positive parenting practices (such as communication and discipline)
127Number of professionals granted CEUs, certifications, or other work- or volunteer-related credentials
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Futures that Work: School to Career Pathways

Value* Outcome Description
28Number of teachers trained in 4-H STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) curriculum
1279Number of youth (students) increasing knowledge in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math)
727Total number of female participants in STEM program
532Number of youth (students) participating in 4-H dropout prevention (student at-risk) programs
102Number of high school age youth (students) participating as members of 4-H clubs
1081Number of adults increasing knowledge of career/employability skills
101Number of youth (students) increasing knowledge of entrepreneurship
238Number of adults increasing knowledge of entrepreneurship
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
934Number of youth (students) gaining knowledge in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math)
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

North Carolinians will make decisions and adopt practices that implement effective resource protection and conservation.

Value* Outcome Description
5966Number of participants increasing their knowledge about best management practices
491Number of participants certified to implement and maintain BMPs
50Number of child and youth educators aspiring to implement quality outdoor learning environments for children
5810Number of youth and adults demonstrating increased knowledge of natural resources and environmental issues
854Number of youth willing to participate in conservation actions
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
896Number of participants that adopted recommended climate adaption strategies for production agriculture or natural resource management, including for invasive species, pest management, pollutant loads, and wetlands.
526Number of acres under recommended climate adaption strategies for production agriculture or natural resource management, including for invasive species, pest management, pollutant loads, and wetlands.
651Number of participants that adopted recommended climate mitigation practices such as water-use efficiency, livestock production feeding practices, carbon sequestration, reducing carbon or energy footprint.
5026Number of acres under recommended climate mitigation practices such as water-use efficiency, livestock production feeding practices, carbon sequestration, reducing carbon or energy footprint.
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Consumers and communities will enhance the value of plants, animals, and landscapes while conserving valuable natural resources and protecting the environment.

Value* Outcome Description
4420Number of participants improving knowledge, attitude, skills and aspirations regarding gardening and landscape practices including plant selection and placement, turfgrass management, soil management, growing food, water conservation and water quality preservation, storm water and erosion management, green waste management, pest and wildlife management
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
3280Number of participants who use extension-recommended best management practices in landscapes, turf, and gardens, including pest (insect, weed, disease) management, fertility management, water conservation, water quality preservation and pruning techniques
164000Total cost savings from the use of extension-recommended best management practices in landscapes, turf, and gardens, including pest (insect, weed, disease) management, fertility management, water conservation, water quality preservation and pruning techniques
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Youth and adult program participants will make healthy food choices, achieve the recommended amount of physical activity and reduce risk factors for chronic diseases.

Value* Impact Description
282Number of adults increasing their fruit and vegetables consumption
1074Number of youth increasing their fruit and vegetable consumption
1435Number of participants increasing their physical activity
383Number of participants reducing their BMI
24Number of adults who reduce their blood pressure
4Number of adults who improve their blood glucose (A1c.)level
4Number of adults who reduce their total cholesterol
592Number of participants who consume less sodium in their diet
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

IV. Number of Contacts Made by Extension

Type of ContactNumber
Face-to-face* 63,249
Non face-to-face** 236,396
Total by Extension staff in 2017 299,645
* Face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make directly with individuals through one-on-one visits, meetings, and other activities where staff members work directly with individuals.
** Non face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make indirectly with individuals by telephone, email, newsletters, news articles, radio, television, and other means.

V. Designated Grants Received by Extension

Type of GrantAmount
Contracts/Grants $1,200,444.04
Gifts/Donations $27,995.06
In-Kind Grants/Donations $77,900.00
United Way/Foundations $150,000.00
User Fees $55,620.00
Total $1,511,959.10

VI. Volunteer Involvement in Extension Programs

Number of Volunteers* Number of Volunteer Hours Known client contacts by volunteers Dollar Value at 24.69
4-H: 532 7,521 78,781 $ 185,693.00
Advisory Leadership System: 45 398 796 $ 9,827.00
Extension Community Association: 105 12,752 17,010 $ 314,847.00
Extension Master Gardener: 168 10,955 12,733 $ 270,479.00
Other: 84 972 242 $ 23,999.00
Total: 934 32598 109562 $ 804,845.00
* The number of volunteers reflects the overall number of volunteers for multiple events.

VII. Membership of Advisory Leadership System

4-H Horse Teen Advisory Committee (Schaffer)
Taylor Carmody
Rachel Smallwood
Mary Miller
Gilbukie Yigit
Peyton Carrington
Annie Winter
Katie Halvorsen
Horticulture- Master Gardener Advisory Committee (Myers)
Bill Bevan, Chair
Margaret Jones, Vice Chair
CeCe Scott, Treasurer
Carolyn Corn
George Gross
Chris Clemmons
Leah Dail
Brian Purvis
Melody Yeargen
Catherine Burton
FCS- Nutrition and Food Safety (Mitchell)
Christian Anatasiadis
Alyssa Barkley
John Braxton
Frances Breedlove
Terry Chappell
Jerry Coleman
Susan Grayson
Melissa Hamm
Mark Herman
Robert Herman
Dan Hurley
Tom Kaznowski
Thomas Jumalon
Kevin Lee
Joe Lumbrazo
Jessica Marehand
Lisa McCoy
Rnoard McFadden
Frank Olafson
Andre Pierce
Lionel Atinet
Missy Vatinet
John vick
Ashley Whittington
Bill Boyd
Arturo Marchand
James Castello
Jess Fowler
Paul Potter
David Prestrud
Jim Mallon
Jean-Paul Garnet
NCCE-Wake County Center- Leadership Advisory Council
Bill Crouse
Wanda Denning
David Pope
Joan Quinn
Ross Yeager
Dewayne Patterson
Paula Arrington
Jerry Dodson
Natalie Hunter
Daniel Dreyton
Brad Thompson

Wake County 4-H Horse Council (Schaffer)
Bill Crouse
Mary MacDougal
Catherine Tipton
Jordan Lewey
Lissy Newton
Tam Hall
Bobbi Spinnenweber
Shannon Robinson
Beth Morgan
Danny Young
Margaret Mattis
Hannah Mattis
Nancy Demus
Youth Thrive Board (Williams)
Brenda Elliot
Hugh McLean
Betsey McFarland
Beth Nelson
Hilton Cancel
Marchell Adams-David
Regina Petteway
Dr. Jocelyn Taliaferro
Chief Brandon Zuidema
Emily Baranello
Moni Singh
Brandy Bynum
Judge Vinson Rozier
Justin Perkins
Nick Allen
Chief Bobby Langston

Robin Rennells
Sarah Carter
Raleigh Promise Transition Team (Williams)
Dr. Jose Picart
Dr. Gerry Nuesell
Dr. Paula Molton-Tolsen
Shaun Green
Caroline Harper
Marius Pettiford
Betsey McFarland
Wake County Human Services Board Social Services Committee (Godwin)
McKinley Wooten
Angie Welsh
Dudley Flood
James Williams
Paul Norman
Kim Best
Marjorie Menestres
Anna Troutman
Tomiko Pigee
Rosine Sanders
John Meier
Lynn Templeton
Kathryn Johnson
NC Watershed Stewardship Network (Woodward)
Kevin Boyer, City of Raleigh
Shari Bryant, NC Wildlife Resources Commission
Caitlin Burke, Conservation Trust for North Carolina
Paul Clark, Use Restoration Watershed Program, NCDWR
Bill Crowell, Abermarle Pamlico National Estuary Partnership
Nancy Daly, NC Ecosystem Enhancement Program
Michele Drostin, UNC Institute for the Environment
Joy Fields, Piedmont Triad Regional Council
Greg Godard, Upper Coastal Plain COG
Wendi Hartup, NC Extension, Forsyth County
Wendy Patoprsty, NC Extension, Watauga County
Joey Hester, NCDA&CS Division of Soil & Water Conservation
Betty Huskins, NC Regional Councils
George Matthis, River Guardian Foundation
Stuart Taylor, Elkin Presbyterian Church
Holly Miller, Town of Wake Forest
Christy Perrin, Water Resources Research Institute
Gloria Putnam, NC Sea Grant
Eric Romaniszyn, Haywood Waterways Association
Rebecca Sadosky, NC Drinking Water Protection Program NCDWR
Mike Schlegel, Triangle J Council of Government
Cy Stober, Piedmont Triad Regional Council
Ron Townley, Upper Coastal Plain COG
Jason Wager, Centralina COG
Nicole Wilkinson, Water Resources Research Institute
Melanie Williams, Basin Planning Branch, NCDWR
Mitch Woodward, NC Cooperative Extension
Tom Hill,(Chair) Community Conservation Assistance Program Coordinator
Jason Doll (Vice Chair) Senior Scientist / Project Manager Moffatt & Nichol
Sarah Bruce (Secretary) Senior Planner Triangle J Council of Government
Christy Perrin (Treasurer) Sustainable Waters & Communities Coordinator, Water Resources Research Institute of UNC System
Fred Royal, Town Engineer, Town of Pittsboro
Rebecca Sadosky, NC Drinking Water Protection Program Coordinator, NC Source Water Protection Program
Commercial Horticulture Program Committee (Myers)
Corey Conners
Jennifer Sanford Johnson
Brian Richardson
Margaret Jones
Carla Berryann
Trish MacPherson
SE Raleigh Innovation Challenge
Melanie Davis-Jones
Marchell Adams-David
Mack Koonce
Rev. Linwood Long
Demetrius Hunter
Kia Baker

VIII. Staff Membership

Katherine Williams
Title: County Extension Director
Phone: (919) 250-1109
Email: katherine_williams@wakegov.com

Ali Alfonso
Title: EFNEP Educator, Extension Program Assistant
Phone: (919) 250-1091
Email: aalfons@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Program Assistant for the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP). Teaches nutrition education to limited resource youth and families in Wake County.

Charlenzo Belcher
Title: 4-H Program Specialist / SPACES
Phone: (919) 250-1100
Email: charlenzo_belcher@ncsu.edu

Lisa Benavente
Title: Regional Nutrition Extension Associate - Urban Programming, EFNEP & SNAP-Ed
Phone: (919) 515-3888
Email: lisa_benavente@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provides programmatic supervision to the EFNEP program in Wake, Durham, and Orange Counties. Responsible for training new EFNEP educators and volunteer development.

Tex Bennett
Title: 4-H Program Specialist
Phone: (919) 250-1100
Email: tex_bennett@ncsu.edu

Daniel Campeau
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Poultry
Phone: (919) 542-8202
Email: dan_campeau@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Work mainly with Commercial Poultry industry. I also work with small scale poultry production. Service area is now the North Central District from Guilford to Halifax with the southern edge being Chatham and Wake county respectively.

Erin Eure
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Commercial Fruits & Vegetables
Phone: (252) 357-1400
Email: erin_eure@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provides educational opportunities and technical support to commercial fruit and vegetable growers, agents, and industry in northeastern NC.

Allyson Farmer
Title: Extension Communication Specialist
Phone: (919) 250-1092
Email: allyson.farmer@wakegov.com

Kristin Feierabend
Title: Area Agent, Extension Urban Programs
Phone: (919) 250-1107
Email: kefeiera@ncsu.edu

Steve Gabel
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Aquaculture
Phone: (252) 482-6585
Email: steve_gabel@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Responsible for aquaculture educational programs for the NC NE extension district.

Gina Garcia-somuk
Title: Volunteer Coordinator
Phone:
Email: Gina_Garcia-Somuk@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Gina is responsible for guiding the outreach and programming efforts of staff, via supervision of 4-H Regional Coaches in Wake County. In addition she administers the Volunteer and Internship system for 4-H WCCE.

Susan Gardner
Title: 4-H Program Assistant
Phone: (919) 250-3795
Email: Sue_Gardner@ncsu.edu

Marissa Herchler
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Animal Food Safety (FSMA Programs)
Phone: (919) 515-5396
Email: marissa_herchler@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Marissa is an Area Specialized Agent for animal food safety, with emphasis on the new Food Safety Modernization Act rules, as they apply to feed mills in North Carolina. Please contact Marissa with any FSMA related questions, or PCQI training inquiries.

Jacobs
Phone:
Email: anecia.jacobs@wakegov.com

Lynette Johnston
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Food Safety
Phone: (919) 515-0303
Email: lynette_johnston@ncsu.edu

Tangela Keaton
Title: Human Services Program Specialist
Phone: (919) 250-1100
Email: tangela_keaton@ncsu.edu

Danny Lauderdale
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Nursery and Greenhouse, Eastern Region
Phone: (252) 237-0111
Email: danny_lauderdale@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provides programming to commercial ornamental nursery and greenhouse producers in eastern North Carolina.

Bill Lord
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Water Resources
Phone: (919) 496-3344
Email: william_lord@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Water quality education and technical assistance

Hiliana Lovejoy
Title: EFNEP Educator, Extension Program Assistant
Phone: (919) 250-1119
Email: hiliana_lovejoy@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Program Assistant for the Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP). Teaches the benefits of nutrition, food safety, and physical activity to limited resource families.

McDaniel
Phone:
Email: jgmcdani@ncsu.edu

Andrew Meyer
Title: Project Management Consultant
Phone: (919) 250-3977
Email: Andrew_Meyer@ncsu.edu

Carol Mitchell
Title: Local Food Coordinator
Phone: (919) 250-1094
Email: carol_s_mitchell@ncsu.edu

Emily Mueller
Title: Extension Agent, Agriculture
Phone: (919) 250-1096
Email: emuelle@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Job Responsibilities include Field Crops and Livestock Production; Main interests are Integrated Insect and Disease Pest Management with Biological Agents; Entomology; Native Habitat Restoration; and Landscape Ecology

Jeana Myers
Title: Extension Agent, Agriculture - Horticulture
Phone: (919) 250-1113
Email: jeana_myers@ncsu.edu

Paula Norris
Title: EFNEP Educator, Extension Program Assistant
Phone: (919) 250-1119
Email: paula_norris@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Program Assistant for the Expanded Food and Nutrition Program (EFNEP). Teaches the benefits of nutrition, food, food safety and physical activity to limited resources families.

Heather Schaffer
Title: Program Manager
Phone: (919) 250-1093
Email: heather.schaffer@wakegov.com

Chip Simmons
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Food Safety
Phone: (919) 414-5632
Email: odsimmon@ncsu.edu

Martha Smith
Title: COSS Administrative Assistant
Phone: (919) 250-1015
Email: mbsmith@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Support Staff for Wake County Director

Debbie Stroud
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Consumer and Retail Food Safety
Phone: (919) 515-9149
Email: dlstroud@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Area Specialized Agents in Consumer and Retail Food Safety help to ensure that Family and Consumer Sciences (FCS) Agents have access to timely, evidence-based food safety information. This is accomplished by (1) working with FCS Agents in their counties, (2) developing food safety materials and (3) planning and implementing a NC Safe Plates Food Safety Info Center.

Ruth Sutherland
Title: Human Services Senior Practitioner
Phone: (919) 250-1100
Email: ruth_sutherland@ncsu.edu

Taylor
Phone:
Email: hktaylor@ncsu.edu

Mitch Woodward
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Watersheds and Water Quality
Phone: (919) 250-1112
Email: mdwoodwa@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: NC Cooperative Extension's Goals include: - NC's natural resources and environmental quality will be protected, conserved and enhanced. - NC will have profitable, environmentally sustainable plant, animal and food systems. Protecting our environmental resources, particularly drinking water quality, is a top priority in NC. NC Cooperative Extension is a leader in teaching, researching, and accelerating the adoption of effective water quality protection practices.

IX. Contact Information

Wake County Center
4001-E Carya Dr
Raleigh, NC 27610

Phone: (919) 250-1100
Fax: (919) 250-1097
URL: http://wake.ces.ncsu.edu