2019 Yadkin County Program Impact Report

Approved: January 9, 2020

I. Executive Summary

Yadkin County Cooperative Extension is an educational partnership between NC State University, NC A&T State University, USDA and Yadkin County Government. Our mission is to deliver education and technology that enriches the lives, land and economy of local citizens. Cooperative Extension programs meet people’s needs, supply decision makers with unbiased data and help individuals, families and communities succeed.
Last year the Yadkin County Cooperative Extension Center received over 20,000 requests for educational information from residents. Volunteers contributed over 825 hours of service to the community.
North Carolina 4-H serves hundreds of thousands of youth across our state through many programs that span from healthy lifestyles, STEM, community service, agriculture, and so much more. In our county, we offer 4-H clubs, school enrichment programs, summer camps, and special interest programs to support the growth of youth in our community. In June of 2019, we added our seventh 4-H Club to the county in the West Yadkin Area. Between July -2018-June-2019, Yadkin County 4-H and Cooperative Extension served 989 youth and teachers in school enrichment programs. This summer we were able to offer 14 Summer Fun programs as well. We hope to keep growing 4-H in our county by living by our slogan of, “Learn-by-doing” in our clubs, school enrichment opportunities, and other educational program options.

117 pesticide applicators were trained by Cooperative Extension. If applicators (farmers) were required to pay outside applicators to spray, it would cost approximately $8/acre. The average farm in Yadkin County is 106 acres. Depending on the agricultural enterprise mix, 7-10 applications would be normal per farm and the value of proper pesticide use amounts to approximately $550,000 in savings due to weed control, resistant weed management and natural resource protection.
Yadkin County Cooperative Extension partnered with Yadkin County Solid Waste and NCDA&CS to host a Pesticide Collection Day. 1572 lbs. of pesticide materials were collected, to be disposed of properly. Because of this Collection Day, over $12,000 in disposal savings was garnered. If disposed of improperly, the clean-up could amount to over $600,000.
Cooperative Extension recommendations resulted in excess of $270,000 in net income gains to producers who adopted best management practices for livestock and crop production in the county.
Hemp production continues to be a topic of discussion with several farmers involved, but with relatively small acreage. The future of this enterprise is still uncertain but Extension is leading educational efforts in this area. A Hemp Production Field Day drew over 80 growers from across the region to learn cutting edge production practices.

The Family and Consumer Science position for Yadkin County was filled in June 2019 and we are excited to bring new programs to the county centered around health and nutrition, local foods, food safety, home food preservation, and much more.

Approximately 450 children, parents and school personnel participated in Agricultural Awareness Day to learn where food comes from and the importance of agriculture, especially animal agriculture, to our local economy.

II. County Background

Yadkin County is a predominantly rural county located in the northwestern Piedmont of North Carolina that covers a land area of approximately 335 square miles. According to the 2010 Census, the county population is 38,406 with a growth rate of one-half percent annually, a trend that has continued for a number of years. The county population breakdown by race is 88.5 percent white, 10 percent Hispanic or Latino origin, 3.5 percent African American, and less than one percent Asian, American Indian and native Hawaiian.

According to the 2010-2014 American Community Survey by the U.S. Census Bureau, the percentage of the county population living below the poverty level is 19.4 percent, compared to 17.6 percent in the state. The median household income is $38,652, and the unemployment rate is 5.1 percent, compared to $46,693 and 6.6 percent for North Carolina.

Approximately 55 percent of the Yadkin workforce work outside of the county. The agricultural industry in Yadkin County is the top employer, followed by educational services, including health care and social assistance, and manufacturing. In recent years, there has been a slight rebound of the manufacturing industry decreasing the unemployment rate and increasing the tax base. The citizens and county government continue efforts to attract new industry and business. Highlights include a land use plan, countywide zoning and water systems, rapid growth of the wine grape industry within the county, implementation of a voluntary agricultural district program, and the addition of two middle schools.

Agriculture remains the dominant industry in the county, with gross sales of agricultural products just under $150 million annually. Although the number of farms continues to decrease like much of North Carolina, agricultural sales and productivity continue to increase. Yadkin County ranks in the top 10 of all North Carolina counties for production of hay, beef cattle, dairy cattle, milk, and layers, and approximately half of the county’s land area is in farms. The county also ranks fifth in grape production in the state supporting the wine and tourism industries.

The county extension staff and advisory groups conducted an environmental scan and the following priority issues have been identified: Health and Wellness, Agriculture and Natural Resources, Economic Development, Youth Development and Community Development.

North Carolina Cooperative Extension, Yadkin County Center, will continue to provide educational programming to empower people and provide solutions. Extension provides practical education to help people, businesses and communities solve problems; develop skills and build a better future. In 2019, Yadkin County programs will address the following statewide objectives: Healthy Eating, Physical Activity, and Chronic Disease Risk Reduction; School to Career; Profitable and Sustainable Animal Production Systems; Profitable and Sustainable Plant Production Systems; Local Food Systems; Volunteer Readiness; Leadership Development; Natural Resources Conservation and Environmental Sustainability; Safety and Security of Our Food and Farm Systems and Urban and Consumer Agriculture.

III. Objectives to Address the Cooperative Extension Long Range Plan

Our family and consumer sciences programs improve the well-being of individuals, families, and communities.

Value* Outcome Description
37Number of adults increasing knowledge of life skills (such as goal setting, stress management, self-care and healthy relationships)
92Number of adults increasing their knowledge of community resources
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
37Number of adults using effective life skills (such as goal setting, stress management, self-care and healthy relationships)
92Number of adults increasing their use of identified community resources
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Our plant production programs improve production, profitability, and sustainability of the agriculture sector.

Value* Outcome Description
135Number of producers who gain skills or knowledge to increase production for local markets.
8Number of producers who improve local food marketing skills or knowledge.
139Number of pesticide applicators receiving continuing education credits
34Number of pesticide credit hours provided
282Number of crop (all plant systems) producers increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, and/or skills as related to: 1. Best management production practices (cultural, nutrient, and genetics) 2. Pest/insect, disease, weed, wildlife management 3. Financial/Farm management tools and practices (business, marketing, government policy, human resources) 4. Alternative agriculture, bioenergy, and value-added enterprises
6Number of Extension initiated and controlled county demonstration test sites
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
42Number of producers who diversified their marketing strategies into local markets (direct, intermediated/food service, institutional).
32Number of producers (and other members of the local food supply chain) who have increased revenue
12Number of new farms (beginning farmers) selling into local markets for local consumption (in this reporting period)
21Number of participants that have adopted farm safety practices
35Number of producers reporting reduction in fertilizer used per acre
124Number of crop (all plant systems) producers adopting best management practices, including those practices related to nutrient management, conservation, production, cultivars, pest management (weeds, diseases, insects), business management, and marketing
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Our animal production programs improve production, profitability, and sustainability of the agriculture sector.

Value* Outcome Description
12Number of producers who improve local food marketing skills or knowledge.
12Number of producers who gain skills or knowledge to increase production for local markets.
38Number of animal producers who increased knowledge of farm business management, business planning, financial management, marketing, or estate planning.
65Number of animal producers who learned how to develop a management plan (i.e. grazing plan, feeding plan, drought plan, business plan, disaster plan, etc.)
75Number of producers who increased knowledge of pasture/forage management practices (field improvement, herbicide management, grazing season extension, weed control, forage quality, haylage production, nitrate testing, etc.)
62Number of producers who increased knowledge of nutrition, ration balancing, mineral supplements, breeding, and reproduction
54Number of producers who increased knowledge of the strategies to promote animal health and welfare and reduce the potential for infectious diseases through proper use of vaccines, biosecurity, detection and identification of common diseases, appropriate use of animal medications, and mitigation of antimicrobial resistance transmission
15Number of producers who increased knowledge of animal waste management practices
3Number of Extension conducted on-site sludge surveys or equipment calibrations
42Number of producers who increased knowledge of how to prepare, mitigate, and recover from natural disasters impacting animal agriculture
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
5Number of producers who diversified their marketing strategies into local markets (direct, intermediated/food service, institutional).
4Number of new farms (beginning farmers) selling into local markets for local consumption (in this reporting period)
15Number of producers (and other members of the local food supply chain) who have increased revenue
16Number of participants that have adopted farm safety practices
12Number of producers adopting extension-recommended practices related to planning, marketing, and financial management
22Number of producers implementing Extension-recommended best management practices for animal waste management
2500Number of acres where Extension-recommended nutrient applications were used
25Number of producers who adopted Extension-recommended best management practices and production changes related to quality assurance (vaccinations, castration, culling techniques, etc.)
19Number of producers who adopted Extension-recommended best management practices and production changes related to genetic improvement (AI, heifer/bull selection)
25Number of producers who adopted Extension-recommended best management practices and production changes related to nutrition (mineral, feed rations)
21Number of producers who adopted Extension-recommended best management practices and production changes related to internal parasite management (fecals, deworming)
41Number of producers who adopted Extension-recommended best management practices related to pasture management
39Number of producers who adopted Extension-recommended best management practices and production changes related to nutrition, ration balancing, mineral supplement, breeding, and reproduction
13Number of producers using improved biosecurity practices
14Number of waste utilization/waste management plans developed or updated
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Our 4-H youth development programs grow the skills young people need to succeed in life and career.

Value* Outcome Description
52Number of high school age youth (students) participating as members of 4-H clubs
149Number of youth increasing knowledge of life skills
812Number of children/youth who improved knowledge of local food and agricultural systems.
44Number of youth increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
396Number of youth demonstrating increased knowledge of natural resources and environmental issues
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
43Number of youth (students) gaining career / employability skills
11Number of youth (students) gaining entrepreneurship skills
17Number of youth using effective life skills
381Number of youth willing to participate in conservation actions
96Number of youth increasing their physical activity
8Number of youth volunteers serving in new or expanded roles within Extension
2Number of youth volunteers serving in new or expanded roles beyond Extension, including community boards and task forces
2Number of youth assuming new/expanded leadership roles in the community
96Number of youth increasing their fruit and vegetable consumption
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Our natural resource and environmental programs conserve our precious natural resources and maintain a clean and healthy environment.

Value* Outcome Description
5Number of participants willing to participate in conservation actions (such as rain gardens, wildlife management, conservation easements, land trusts, generational planning, etc.)
10Number of participants increasing their knowledge about best management practices (including storm water systems, septic system maintenance, erosion control, rain gardens, forestry, etc.)
14Number of adults demonstrating increased knowledge of natural resources and environmental issues
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
6Number of participants implementing extension-recommended practices to conserve water use and protect water quality
12Number of participants that adopted recommended agroecosystem mitigation practices such as water-use efficiency, livestock production feeding practices, carbon sequestration, reducing carbon or energy footprint.
300Number of acres under recommended agroecosystem mitigation practices such as water-use efficiency, livestock production feeding practices, carbon sequestration, reducing carbon or energy footprint.
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Our consumer horticulture programs teach families and communities about environmentally friendly methods for gardening and controlling pests.

Value* Outcome Description
724Number of individuals who gain knowledge or acquire skills related to vegetable/fruit gardening
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
16Number of individuals who grow food in community gardens.
72Number of individuals who begin home food production by starting a vegetable and/or fruit garden
144Number of participants who use extension-recommended best management practices in landscapes, turf, and gardens, including pest (insect, weed, disease, wildlife) and soil management
36Number of participants selecting appropriate landscape plants (adapted, drought tolerant, appropriate size, etc.)
362Number of participants growing food for home consumption
3Number of participants adopting composting
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Our food safety and nutrition programs create a safer and more sustainable food supply and improve the health and nutrition of individuals, families, and our communities.

IV. Number of Contacts Made by Extension

Type of ContactNumber
Face-to-face* 9,233
Non face-to-face** 489,386
Total by Extension staff in 2019 498,619
* Face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make directly with individuals through one-on-one visits, meetings, and other activities where staff members work directly with individuals.
** Non face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make indirectly with individuals by telephone, email, newsletters, news articles, radio, television, and other means.

V. Designated Grants Received by Extension

Type of GrantAmount
Contracts/Grants $0.00
Gifts/Donations $10,790.00
In-Kind Grants/Donations $0.00
United Way/Foundations $2,500.00
User Fees $0.00
Total $13,290.00

VI. Volunteer Involvement in Extension Programs

Number of Volunteers* Number of Volunteer Hours Known client contacts by volunteers Dollar Value at 25.43
4-H 137 476 1272 $ 12,105.00
Advisory Leadership System 8 27 48 $ 687.00
Extension Master Gardener 16 74 89 $ 1,882.00
Other: Agriculture 33 114 227 $ 2,899.00
Total: 194 691 1636 $ 17,572.00
* The number of volunteers reflects the overall number of volunteers for multiple events.

VII. Membership of Advisory Leadership System

Advisory Leadership Council
Lenuel Chamberlain
Tim Doub
Debbie Gough
Wendy Hayden
Michael Helton
Gilbert Hemric
Lisa Hughes
Brent Hunter
Sandra Kieffer
Donna Love
Ruth Matthews
Tommy Shore
Walter Smith
Justin Somers
Bobby Todd
Jason Walker
Sam Williams
Agricultural Advisory Board
Jesse Brown
Marty Casstevens
Jeff Doub
Van Hemric
Brent Hunter
Bobby Matthews
Greg Moxley
Reggie Pilcher
Walter Smith
Justin Somers
4-H Advisory Committee
Tasha Brown
Debbie Gough
Leslie Hernandez
Ruth Matthews
Bobbie Scott
Ashley Wilbanks
FCS Advisory Committee
Rhonda Beavers
Ellen Cheek
Wendy Hayden
Janice Holbrook
Donna Love
Yolanda Saffo
Brenda Vasquez
4-H County Council
Carly Greene
Bryson Helton
Leslie Hernandez
Skylar Kimmer
Griffin Taylor
Yadkin-Davie 4-H Livestock Association Officers
Bud Martin
Jennie Rucker
Tommy Shore
Judy Wilson
Farmers Market Board
Kathy Baity
Glenda Edgell
Everette Hartzog
Martha Holden
Shannon Holden
Brent Hunter
Melissa Manning
Aileen Steelman

VIII. Staff Membership

Bryan Cave
Title: County Extension Director, Surry and Interim County Extension Director, Yadkin
Phone: (336) 401-8025
Email: bryan_cave@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Administration, Livestock, Forages

Ashley Beard
Title: Extension Agent, Family and Consumer Sciences
Phone: (336) 849-7908
Email: ashley_beard@ncsu.edu

Marti Day
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Dairy
Phone: (919) 542-8202
Email: marti_day@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Responsible for educational programs for dairy farmers, youth with an interest in dairy projects and the general public with an interest in dairy foods and the dairy industry.

Lauren Greene
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Poultry
Phone: (336) 651-7347
Email: lauren_greene@ncsu.edu

Tim Hambrick
Title: Area Agent, Agriculture
Phone: (336) 703-2857
Email: tim_hambrick@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Area Field Crop Agent for Forsyth, Stokes, and Surry, and Yadkin counties. Responsibilities include educational programming and research in flue cured tobacco, corn, small grain, and soybean production.

Marissa Herchler
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Animal Food Safety (FSMA Programs)
Phone: (919) 515-5396
Email: marissa_herchler@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Marissa is an Area Specialized Agent for animal food safety, with emphasis on the new Food Safety Modernization Act rules, as they apply to feed mills in North Carolina. Please contact Marissa with any FSMA related questions, or PCQI training inquiries.

Madaline Jones
Title: Extension Agent, 4-H Youth Development
Phone: (336) 428-4573
Email: madaline_jones@ncsu.edu

Stacey Jones
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Commercial Nursery and Greenhouse
Phone: (704) 920-3310
Email: stacey_jones@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: I work with commercial greenhouses and nurseries to help them with growing related issues. These issues range from pests (insect, disease, and weeds), substrates, nutrition, and other miscellaneous topics.

Peggie Lewis Joyce
Title: Area 4-H Agent - Central Region
Phone: (336) 242-2080
Email: peggie_lewis@ncsu.edu

Hannah Lepsch
Title: Extension Agent, Agriculture - Horticulture
Phone: (336) 849-7908
Email: hannah_lepsch@ncsu.edu

Craig Mauney
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Commercial Vegetables and Fruits
Phone: (828) 684-3562
Email: craig_mauney@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provides educational opportunities, training and technical support to commercial fruit and vegetable growers, agents, and industry in Western NC. (My office is located at the Mountain Horticulture Crops Research and Extension Center not the Henderson County Extension Center as is noted by IT on this website. Please do not contact the Henderson County Extension Center as I am not located there.)

Currey Nobles
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Food Safety
Phone: (919) 515-9520
Email: canobles@ncsu.edu

Ashley Robbins
Title: Area Specialized Agent - Dairy
Phone: (919) 542-8203
Email: ashley_robbins@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Marti Day and I are the Area Specialized Dairy Agents - the county-based arm of the Cooperative Extension Dairy Team. We are out here in the counties to help you set and reach your farm, family and business goals. We have collaborative expertise in the areas of Waste Management, Udder Health, Cow Comfort, Nutrition and Forage Management with specialties in (Ashley)Reproduction, Records Management, Animal Health and (Marti)Alternative Markets, Organic Dairy, Grazing Management, and On-farm Processing. We hope to provide comprehensive educational programs for our farmers, consumers and youth for every county across the state. We are here for you by phone, email or text and look forward to working with you!

Elena Rogers
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Food Safety - Fresh Produce Western NC
Phone: (828) 352-2519
Email: elena_rogers@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provide educational programs, training and technical support focusing on fresh produce safety to Agents and growers in Western NC.

Phil Rucker
Title: Area Agent, Agriculture - Livestock
Phone: (336) 753-6100
Email: phil_rucker@ncsu.edu

Irene Smith
Title: County Extension Administrative Assistant
Phone: (336) 849-7908
Email: irene_smith@ncsu.edu

Mitch Woodward
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Watersheds and Water Quality
Phone: (919) 414-3873
Email: mdwoodwa@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: NC Cooperative Extension's Goals include: - NC's natural resources and environmental quality will be protected, conserved and enhanced. - NC will have profitable, environmentally sustainable plant, animal and food systems. Protecting our environmental resources, particularly drinking water quality, is a top priority in NC. NC Cooperative Extension is a leader in teaching, researching, and accelerating the adoption of effective water quality protection practices.

IX. Contact Information

Yadkin County Center
2051 Agricultural Way
Suite 201
Yadkinville, NC 27055

Phone: (336) 849-7908
Fax: (336) 849-7928
URL: http://yadkin.ces.ncsu.edu