2018 Yadkin County Program Impact Report

Approved: January 25, 2019

I. Executive Summary

Yadkin County Cooperative Extension is an educational partnership between NC State University, NC A&T State University and Yadkin County. Our mission is to deliver education and technology that enriches the lives, land and economy of local citizens. Cooperative Extension meets people’s needs, supplies decision makers with unbiased data and helps individuals, families, farms and communities succeed. Cooperative Extension accomplishes this through one-on-one visits, training classes, telephone consultations, social media and website postings, newsletters, magazine and news articles, speaking engagements, demonstrations and other educational delivery methods.
Last year the Yadkin County Cooperative Extension Center had 19,507 contacts for information. In addition, 50 educational opportunities were offered to Yadkin County residents. Volunteers contributed 1,040 hours of time to help expand Extension outreach at an estimated value of over $25,000.
Farm income was increased by over $2,600,000 for livestock, field crop and horticultural producers due to the adoption of Cooperative Extension recommended Best Management Practices.
Cooperative Extension partnered with Yadkin County Public Works and the NC Department of Agriculture to host a Household Hazardous Waste Collection Day. This annual event safely disposed of 2,272 pounds of unwanted pesticides.
$23,650 in outside fiscal resources were garnered for educational opportunities for county citizens.
GAP Training for 113 tobacco producers was delivered resulting in more income for tobacco producers.
305 pesticide license holders were either recertified or certified as a new applicator.
Throughout 2018 Yadkin County 4-H offered a variety of programs including school to career topics, plant and animal science, earth science, natural resource management, sewing, cooking, and STEM development activities. With a total of 17 programs offered, Yadkin County 4-H was able to reach 711 youth in programs last year.
As the Industrial Hemp Pilot Program continues, we are seeing an increase in licensed growers in Yadkin and surrounding counties. Most industrial hemp learning sessions have been centered around introductory information and how to actually apply for license. Several licensed growers contacted Cooperative Extension asking for a more in-depth training focusing on the agronomics of producing hemp as most of them had at least one year of growing experience under their belt.
Cooperative Extension in cooperation with the local school system and numerous volunteers, sponsor an annual Agricultural Awareness Day for all second graders in the county. Ag Awareness Day emphasizes how vital agriculture, especially farm animals, are to our everyday food supply and contribute to many everyday products we use. Over 500 youth, teachers, volunteers, school and government officials participated.
In summary, with increases in income, cost savings and fiscal resources Yadkin County Cooperative Extension brought cost savings or increased income of $2,687,150 to Yadkin County citizens.

II. County Background

Yadkin County is a predominantly rural county located in the northwestern Piedmont of North Carolina that covers a land area of approximately 335 square miles. According to the 2010 Census, the county population is 38,406 with a growth rate of one-half percent annually, a trend that has continued for a number of years. The county population breakdown by race is 88.5 percent white, 10 percent Hispanic or Latino origin, 3.5 percent African American, and less than one percent Asian, American Indian and native Hawaiian.

According to the 2010-2014 American Community Survey by the U.S. Census Bureau, the percentage of the county population living below the poverty level is 19.4 percent, compared to 17.6 percent in the state. The median household income is $38,652, and the unemployment rate is 5.1 percent, compared to $46,693 and 6.6 percent for North Carolina.

Approximately 55 percent of the Yadkin workforce work outside of the county. The agricultural industry in Yadkin County is the top employer, followed by educational services, including health care and social assistance, and manufacturing. In recent years, there has been a slight rebound of the manufacturing industry decreasing the unemployment rate and increasing the tax base. The citizens and county government continue efforts to attract new industry and business. Highlights include a land use plan, countywide zoning and water systems, rapid growth of the wine grape industry within the county, implementation of a voluntary agricultural district program, and the addition of two middle schools. A cultural art center opened in 2010 and was followed by the opening of a theater in late 2012, offering a new attraction for residents and tourists. Yadkin Memorial Park and Lake Hampton, a new reservoir and recreation area opened in late 2014, and the new Yadkin County Agricultural and Education Center opened in 2016.

Agriculture remains the dominant industry in the county, with gross sales of agricultural products just under $125 million annually, according to the 2012 Census of Agriculture. Although the number of farms continues to decrease like much of North Carolina, agricultural sales and productivity continue to increase. Yadkin County ranks in the top 10 of all North Carolina counties for production of hay, beef cattle, dairy cattle, milk, and layers, and approximately half of the county’s land area is in farms. The county also ranks fifth in grape production in the state supporting the wine and tourism industries.

The county extension staff and advisory groups conducted an environmental scan in 2007, using a combination of committee meetings, media scans and individual interviews. The scan reaffirmed and supported the educational role Extension plays in assisting county government, individual county citizens and other county entities in addressing issues of importance to this county. Needs assessments have continued since 2007 utilizing advisory groups, evaluations, surveys and interviews. Through the results of county environmental scanning and needs assessments, the following priority issues have been identified: Health and Wellness, Agriculture and Natural Resources, Economic Development, Youth Development and Community Development.

North Carolina Cooperative Extension, Yadkin County Center, will continue to provide educational programming to empower people and provide solutions. Extension provides practical education to help people, businesses and communities solve problems; develop skills and build a better future. In 2018, Yadkin County programs will address the following statewide objectives: Healthy Eating, Physical Activity, and Chronic Disease Risk Reduction; School to Career; Profitable and Sustainable Animal Production Systems; Profitable and Sustainable Plant Production Systems; Local Food Systems; Volunteer Readiness; Leadership Development; Natural Resources Conservation and Environmental Sustainability; Safety and Security of Our Food and Farm Systems and Urban and Consumer Agriculture.

III. Objectives to Address the Cooperative Extension Long Range Plan

North Carolina's plant production systems will become more profitable and sustainable.

Value* Outcome Description
188Number of crop (all plant systems) producers increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, and/or skills as related to: 1. Best management production practices (cultural, nutrient, and genetics) 2. Pest/insect, disease, weed, wildlife management 3. Financial/Farm management tools and practices (business, marketing, government policy, human resources) 4. Alternative agriculture, bioenergy, and value-added enterprises
1Number of Extension initiated and controlled County demonstration test sites (new required for GLF/PSI reporting)
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
10Number of crop (all plant systems) producers adopting best management practices, including those practices related to nutrient management, conservation, production, cultivars, pest management (weeds, diseases, insects), business management, and marketing
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

North Carolina's animal production systems will become more profitable and sustainable.

Value* Outcome Description
42Number of animal producers increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, and/or skills as related to: 1. Best management production practices (cultural, nutrient, and genetics) 2. Pest/insect, disease, weed, wildlife management 3. Financial/Farm management tools and practices (business, marketing, government policy, human resources) 4. Alternative agriculture, bioenergy, and value-added enterprises
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
33Number of animal producers adopting Extension-recommended best management practices, including those practices related to husbandry, improved planning, marketing, and financial practices
57000Net income gains by producers adopting Extension-recommended best management practices, including those practices related to husbandry, improved planning, marketing, and financial practices
26Number of animal producers implementing Extension-recommended best management practices for animal waste management
33000Tons of livestock organic by-products utilized (nutrients from waste, compost, etc)
42000Net income gain by using livestock organic by-products instead of synthetic fertilizers
9Number of waste management certifications gained or maintained due to Extension education efforts
5500Number of acres where Extension-recommended waste analysis was used for proper land application
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Producers will increase sales of food locally to more agriculturally aware consumers through market development, producer and consumer education, and new farmer and infrastructure support.

Value* Outcome Description
31Number of children/youth who improved knowledge of local food and agricultural systems.
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Agricultural producers, workers, food handlers and consumers will adopt safer food and agricultural production, handling, and distribution practices that reduce workplace and home injuries/illnesses, enhance food security, and increase the quality and safety of food that North Carolinians prepare and consume.

Value* Outcome Description
70Number of commercial/public operators trained
10Number of pesticide application credit hours provided
3Number of persons certified in Pork Quality Assurance (PQA) or Beef Quality Assurance (BQA)
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
27Number of participants that have adopted farm safety practices
4500Value of number of non-lost work days
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Individuals and groups will acquire leadership and decision making capacities needed to guide and actively participate in local and state organizations.

Value* Outcome Description
8Number of adults assuming new/expanded leadership roles in the community
31Number of youth increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
7Number of youth assuming new/expanded leadership roles in the community
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
8Number of adults assuming new/expanded leadership roles in the community
31Number of youth increasing/improving knowledge, attitudes, skills, and/or aspirations regarding leadership
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Youth and adults will address community issues and/or challenges through volunteerism.

Futures that Work: School to Career Pathways

Value* Outcome Description
6Total number of female participants in STEM program
26Number of high school age youth (students) participating as members of 4-H clubs
30Number of youth (students) increasing knowledge of career/employability skills
26Number of youth (students) increasing knowledge of entrepreneurship
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
16Number of youth (students) gaining knowledge in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math)
26Number of youth (students) gaining career / employability skills
26Number of youth (students) gaining entrepreneurship skills
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

North Carolinians will make decisions and adopt practices that implement effective resource protection and conservation.

Value* Outcome Description
16Number of participants increasing their knowledge about best management practices
53Number of youth and adults demonstrating increased knowledge of natural resources and environmental issues
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.
Value* Impact Description
12Number of participants that adopted recommended climate mitigation practices such as water-use efficiency, livestock production feeding practices, carbon sequestration, reducing carbon or energy footprint.
4200Number of acres under recommended climate mitigation practices such as water-use efficiency, livestock production feeding practices, carbon sequestration, reducing carbon or energy footprint.
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

Consumers and communities will enhance the value of plants, animals, and landscapes while conserving valuable natural resources and protecting the environment.

Youth and adult program participants will make healthy food choices, achieve the recommended amount of physical activity and reduce risk factors for chronic diseases.

Value* Impact Description
28Number of youth increasing their fruit and vegetable consumption
57Number of participants increasing their physical activity
* Note: Values may include numbers from multi-county efforts.

IV. Number of Contacts Made by Extension

Type of ContactNumber
Face-to-face* 6,819
Non face-to-face** 11,701
Total by Extension staff in 2018 18,520
* Face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make directly with individuals through one-on-one visits, meetings, and other activities where staff members work directly with individuals.
** Non face-to-face contacts include contacts that Extension personnel make indirectly with individuals by telephone, email, newsletters, news articles, radio, television, and other means.

V. Designated Grants Received by Extension

Type of GrantAmount
Contracts/Grants $2,200.00
Gifts/Donations $17,250.00
In-Kind Grants/Donations $0.00
United Way/Foundations $4,200.00
User Fees $0.00
Total $23,650.00

VI. Volunteer Involvement in Extension Programs

Number of Volunteers* Number of Volunteer Hours Known client contacts by volunteers Dollar Value at 25.43
4-H: 187 533 923 $ 13,554.00
Advisory Leadership System: 20 30 25 $ 763.00
Extension Community Association: 0 0 0 $ 0.00
Extension Master Gardener: 7 200 150 $ 5,086.00
Other: 124 277 365 $ 7,044.00
Total: 338 1040 1463 $ 26,447.00
* The number of volunteers reflects the overall number of volunteers for multiple events.

VII. Membership of Advisory Leadership System

Advisory Leadership Council
Lenuel Chamberlain
Tim Doub
Debbie Gough
Wendy Hayden
Michael Helton
Gilbert Hemric
Lisa Hughes
Brent Hunter
Sandra Kieffer
Donna Love
Ruth Matthews
Tommy Shore
Walter Smith
Justin Somers
Bobby Todd
Jason Walker
Sam Williams
Agricultural Advisory Board
Jesse Brown
Marty Casstevens
Jeff Doub
Van Hemric
Brent Hunter
Bobby Matthews
Greg Moxley
Reggie Pilcher
Walter Smith
Justin Somers
4-H Advisory Committee
Debbie Gough
Madaline Jones
Ruth Matthews
Jennie Rucker
Ashley Wilbanks
Tammy Whitaker
FCS Advisory Committee
Rhonda Beavers
Ellen Cheek
Wendy Hayden
Janice Holbrook
Donna Love
Yolanda Saffo
Brenda Vasquez
4-H County Council
Abigail Barron
Andrew Blevins
Ashley Collins
Jenna Colvin
Conner Cummings
Grayce Dorn
Grace Gilyard
Christy Rucker
Leah Thomas
Yadkin-Davie 4-H Livestock Association Officers
Bud Martin
Jennie Rucker
Tommy Shore
Judy Wilson
Farmers Market Board
Kathy Baity
Glenda Edgell
Everette Hartzog
Martha Holden
Shannon Holden
Brent Hunter
Melissa Manning
Aileen Steelman

VIII. Staff Membership

Bryan Cave
Title: County Extension Director, Surry and Interim County Extension Director, Yadkin
Phone: (336) 401-8025
Email: bryan_cave@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Administration, Livestock, Forages

Ashley Beard
Title: Extension Agent, Family & Consumer Sciences
Phone: (336) 849-7908
Email: ashley_beard@ncsu.edu

Brent Buchanan
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Dairy
Phone: (315) 212-1277
Email: babuchan@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Dairy Extension Programming in Western North Carolina Counties of Haywood, Madison, Buncombe, Transylvania, Henderson, Yancey, McDowell, Polk, Rutherford, Mitchell, Avery, Burke, Cleveland, Watauga, Caldwell, Catawba, Lincoln, Gaston, Ashe, Wilkes, Alexander, Iredell, Alleghany, Surry, Yadkin, and Davie.

Lauren Greene
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Poultry
Phone: (336) 651-7347
Email: lauren_greene@ncsu.edu

Tim Hambrick
Title: Area Agent, Agriculture
Phone: (336) 703-2857
Email: tim_hambrick@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Area Field Crop Agent for Forsyth, Stokes, and Surry, and Yadkin counties. Responsibilities include educational programming and research in flue cured tobacco, corn, small grain, and soybean production.

Marissa Herchler
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Animal Food Safety (FSMA Programs)
Phone: (919) 515-5396
Email: marissa_herchler@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Marissa is an Area Specialized Agent for animal food safety, with emphasis on the new Food Safety Modernization Act rules, as they apply to feed mills in North Carolina. Please contact Marissa with any FSMA related questions, or PCQI training inquiries.

Madaline Jones
Title: Extension Agent, 4-H Youth Development
Phone: (336) 849-7908
Email: madaline_jones@ncsu.edu

Stacey Jones
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Commercial Nursery and Greenhouse
Phone: (704) 920-3310
Email: stacey_jones@ncsu.edu

Peggie Lewis Joyce
Title: Area 4-H Agent - Central Region
Phone: (336) 242-2080
Email: peggie_lewis@ncsu.edu

Hannah Lepsch
Title: Extension Agent, Agriculture - Horticulture
Phone: (336) 849-7908
Email: hclepsch@ncsu.edu

Bill Lord
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Water Resources
Phone: (919) 496-3344
Email: william_lord@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Water quality education and technical assistance

Craig Mauney
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Commercial Vegetables and Fruits
Phone: (828) 684-3562
Email: craig_mauney@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provides educational opportunities, training and technical support to commercial fruit and vegetable growers, agents, and industry in Western NC.

Rachel McDowell
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Consumer and Retail Food Safety
Phone: (919) 515-9155
Email: romcdowe@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Support FCS Agents in delivering timely and evidence-based food safety education and information to stakeholders in NC.

Marsha McGraw
Title: Area Agent, Agriculture - Field Crops
Phone: (336) 753-6100
Email: mlmcgraw@ncsu.edu

Currey Nobles
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Food Safety
Phone: (919) 515-9520
Email: canobles@ncsu.edu

Elena Rogers
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Agriculture - Food Safety - Fresh Produce Western NC
Phone: (828) 352-2519
Email: elena_rogers@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: Provide educational programs, training and technical support focusing on fresh produce safety to Agents and growers in Western NC.

Phil Rucker
Title: Area Agent, Agriculture - Livestock
Phone: (336) 753-6100
Email: phil_rucker@ncsu.edu

Irene Smith
Title: County Extension Administrative Assistant
Phone: (336) 849-7908
Email: irene_smith@ncsu.edu

Mitch Woodward
Title: Area Specialized Agent, Watersheds and Water Quality
Phone: (919) 250-1112
Email: mdwoodwa@ncsu.edu
Brief Job Description: NC Cooperative Extension's Goals include: - NC's natural resources and environmental quality will be protected, conserved and enhanced. - NC will have profitable, environmentally sustainable plant, animal and food systems. Protecting our environmental resources, particularly drinking water quality, is a top priority in NC. NC Cooperative Extension is a leader in teaching, researching, and accelerating the adoption of effective water quality protection practices.

IX. Contact Information

Yadkin County Center
2051 Agricultural Way
Suite 201
Yadkinville, NC 27055

Phone: (336) 849-7908
Fax: (336) 849-7928
URL: http://yadkin.ces.ncsu.edu